Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 202

Thread: Pimsleur - Level 1

  1. #41
    Завсегдатай Basil77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Moscow reg.
    Posts
    2,555
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Good to know. Is it the 'выпить' that implies I'm an alcoholic? To be honest, through 15 lessons Pimsleur hasn't even used 'пить' so I'm not clear on the distinction.
    I don't quite agree with Olya. This phrase simply sounds unnatural (выпивать sounds far more naturally here.). And if one of my friends asks me "Хочешь чего-нибудь выпить?" and I answer "Да" (or "Нет", it doesn't matter), it doesn't mean that I'm an alcoholic at all. But the question implies a drink, that contains alcohol. If you want to offer a non-alcoholic drink to someone, you should ask: "Хочешь чего-нибудь попить?" But выпил стакан молока." ("I'v drunk a glass of milk" ) is OK. Funny, isn't it?
    Please, correct my mistakes, except for the cases I misspell something on purpose!

  2. #42
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Basil77
    I don't quite agree with Olya. This phrase simply sounds unnatural (выпивать sounds far more naturally here.). And if one of my friends asks me "Хочешь чего-нибудь выпить?" and I answer "Да" (or "Нет", it doesn't matter), it doesn't mean that I'm an alcoholic at all.
    Of course not!! I didn't say it! I just say, that THIS sentence ("Сейчас я не хочу выпить") sounds like an alcoholic says that he WRITE NOW doesn't want to drink. In other situation this sentence sounds unnatural...
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  3. #43
    Завсегдатай Basil77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Moscow reg.
    Posts
    2,555
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Of course not!! I didn't say so! I just say_ that THIS sentence ("Сейчас я не хочу выпить") sounds like an alcoholic says that he RIGHT NOW doesn't want to drink. In other situation this sentence sounds unnatural...
    Оля, согласись, что фраза "Сейчас я не хочу выпить" - корявая, так никто не говорит, ни алкоголики, ни кто бы то ни было ещё. Зря ты запутала беднягу с "алкоголиком".
    Please, correct my mistakes, except for the cases I misspell something on purpose!

  4. #44
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Я соглашусь, что фраза корявая
    Но смотри, в теории вот такая фраза возможна: "Странно, вообще-то я хронический алкоголик, но сейчас я не хочу выпить..."
    Вообще-то это шутка, конечно. Так никто не говорит. И алкоголик так НИКОГДА не скажет!
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  5. #45
    Завсегдатай Basil77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Moscow reg.
    Posts
    2,555
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Я соглашусь, что фраза корявая
    Но смотри, в теории вот такая фраза возможна: "Странно, вообще-то я хронический алкоголик, но сейчас я не хочу выпить..."
    Вообще-то это шутка, конечно. Так никто не говорит. И алкоголик так НИКОГДА не скажет!
    Тогда уж "сейчас я не хочу выпивать" или "сейчас у меня нет желания выпить" :P
    Please, correct my mistakes, except for the cases I misspell something on purpose!

  6. #46
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    I'm nearly caught up. Here's 13:

    Урок номер тринадцать – Lesson Number Thirteen

    Слушайте этот разговор по телефону. – Listen to this telephone conversation.

    Л: Алло!
    С: Алло, Лена. Это Сергей.
    Л: Здравствуйте, Сергей Александревич.
    С: Скажите, Лена, не хотели бы вы поужинать со мной?
    Л: Сегодня? Сегодня я собираюсь поужинать с Анной. Но может быть, вы хотите что-нибудь выпить позже?
    С: Да, с удовольствием. Во сколько?
    Л: Может быть, в девять часов или немного позже? В десять часов?
    С: Хорошо. В десять часов у вас. До свидания, Лена.
    Л: До свидания, Сергей.

    Сколько я должна? – How much do I owe? [this is how a woman says it]
    Добрый вечер. – good evening
    Сколько у вас? – How much do you have? [lit. How much at you?]
    Сколько у вас рублей? – How many rubles do you have?
    У меня один рубль. – I have one ruble.
    У меня два рубля. – I have two rubles. [Notice the ending]
    У вас есть тринадцать рублей? – Do you have thirteen rubles? [есть = ‘have’ here]
    Четырнадцать - fourteen
    У меня есть четырнадцать рублей. – I have fourteen rubles.
    Пятнадцать - fifteen
    У меня есть пятнадцать долларов тоже. – I have fifteen dollars too.
    У меня четырнадцать рублей и пятнадцать долларов. – I have fourteen rubles and fifteen dollars.
    Извините, я не хочу долларов. – Excuse me. I don’t want dollars.
    У вас есть шестнадцать рублей? – Do you have sixteen rubles?
    Это хорошо. – That’s OK.
    Сколько это рублей? – How much is that in rubles?
    Вы говорите c продавщицей. – You’re speaking with the saleswoman
    С вас – you owe [lit. from you]
    С вас одиннадцать рублей. – You owe eleven rubles.
    У меня нет рублей. – I have no rubles. [lit. I have none rubles]
    Тогда вот десять рублей. – Then here are ten rubles.
    Вы в кафе на Тверской улице. – You’re in a caf

  7. #47
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Это хорошо. – That’s OK.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  8. #48
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Извините, я не хочу долларов.
    Какая-то странная фраза, официант так не скажет.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  9. #49
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Извините, я не хочу долларов.
    Какая-то странная фраза, официант так не скажет.
    I'm not completely sure I understand you. Is it a strange phrase because of the grammar or because of what is being said?

  10. #50
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Извините, я не хочу долларов.
    Какая-то странная фраза, официант так не скажет.
    I'm not completely sure I understand you. Is it a strange phrase because of the grammar or because of what is being said?
    I said - официант так не скажет - a waiter wouldn't say the phrase like this.

    First of all, the grammar is at first sight ok, but I think the genetive case isn't appropriate here. "Я не хочу доллары" would be better...

    Secondly, I don't think that a waiter would say "Я хочу (or я не хочу) доллары, рубли, etc". I don't understand why he says "я" (why not "мы") and I don't understand why he says "хочу" (it sounds strange, a client doesn't care, what does a waiter "want").

    I think if he doesn't want to take dollars, he'd say "Мы не принимаем доллары" or "Мне не нужны доллары" (it's less polite) or "Ой, нет, только не доллары, пожалуйста" or somehow otherwise...
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  11. #51
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    Вот, пожалуйста, урок номер четырнадцать:

    Урок номер четырнадцать – Lesson Number Fourteen

    Американец хочет купить газету. – An American (man) wants to buy a newspaper.
    Он говорит с продавщицей. – He is speaking with the saleswoman

    А: Извините, я хотел бы купить газету.
    П: Да, вот, пожалуйста.
    А: Спасибо. Сколько я должен?
    П: Восемь рублей, пожалуйста.
    А: Восемнадцать рублей?!
    П: Нет, восемь. С вас восемь рублей, пожалуйста.
    А: Ах, сейчас понимаю. Вот, пожалуйста. Восемь рублей.

    Вот, пожалуйста. – Here you are. (polite) [while handing someone something; literally ‘here, please’]
    Вот, пожалуйста, четырнадцать рублей. - Here you are, fourteen rubles.
    Много – a lot
    У меня много рублей. – I have a lot of rubles.
    [Though note, just like an American wouldn't say 'I have a lot of dollars,' a Russian wouldn't say this. Money (денег) sounds better here.]
    Нет, не очень много. – No, not very many.
    Дайте мне – Give (to) me
    Несколько – a few
    У вас есть несколько долларов? – Do you have a few dollars [notice the есть – ‘few’ counts as a specific amount.]
    Семнадцать - seventeen
    Восемнадцать - eighteen
    Девятнадцать - nineteen
    У меня есть три или четыре рубля – I have three or four rubles.
    Сколько у вас рублей? – How many rubles do you have?
    У меня восемнадцать рублей. – I have eighteen rubles. [Notice that есть isn’t required when asking or answering the question how many.]
    Это не очень много. – That’s not very many.
    Большой - big
    Большое спасибо. – Thank you very much [lit. big thank you]
    Я хотела бы купить вина, а у меня нет рублей. – I would like to buy some wine and I don’t have any rubles. [though again, 'денег' would sound better to a Russian]
    Дайте мне семнадцать или восемнадцать рублей, пожалуйста. – Give me seventeen or eighteen rubles please.
    Сколько вы хотите? – How many do you want?
    Вот, пожалуйста, десять рублей. – Here you are (polite) ten rubles.

  12. #52
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    У меня много рублей. – I have a lot of rubles.
    У меня много денег is much better.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    У меня восемнадцать рублей. – I have eighteen rubles. [Notice that есть isn’t used when asking or answering the question how many.]
    Why not? It may be not used or may be used (more rarely).

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Большое спасибо. – Thank you very much [lit. big thank you]

    Я хотела бы купить вина, а (or но) у меня нет денег. – I would like to buy some wine and I don’t have any rubles.

    Сколько вы хотите? – How many do you want?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  13. #53
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    У меня много рублей. – I have a lot of rubles.
    У меня много денег is much better.
    We'll get there. I think денег shows up in lesson 16. Also, isn't Денег a much more general term? I would think a tourist could have a lot of money (pounds, dollars, euro, etc.) but not a single ruble.

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    У меня восемнадцать рублей. – I have eighteen rubles. [Notice that есть isn’t used when asking or answering the question how many.]
    Why not? It may be not used or may be used (more rarely).
    Because the narrator guy said so. I'll change 'used' to 'required.'

  14. #54
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Grogs, a Russian wouldn't say "у меня нет рублей", only "у меня нет денег".
    But of course a tourist can say "у меня нет рублей" (~I don't have russian money).
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  15. #55
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Grogs, a Russian wouldn't say "у меня нет рублей", only "у меня нет денег".
    But of course a tourist can say "у меня нет рублей" (~I don't have russian money).
    You just have to remember the intended audience of the CD's. They tend to be geared towards tourists and people like me who might visit a few times a year on business.

    It seems to work the same way in American English. We never say 'I don't have any dollars,' we say 'I don't have any money.' However, if a foreign visitor (even a British one) told me 'I don't have any dollars,' I would take that to mean that he needs to exchange some money, not that he's broke: У меня нет рублей, но у меня много долларов. It seems like it would be an important distinction to be able to make.

  16. #56
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    Here's Lesson 15:

    Урок номер пятнадцать – Lesson Number Fifteen

    Слушайте этот разговор. – Listen to this conversation
    Л: До свидания, Сергей.
    С: До свидания? Что бы вы хотели делать, Лена?
    Л: Я? Я собираюсь купить что-нибудь поесть.
    С: У вас достаточно денег? Сколько у вас?
    Л: Не очень много. У меня только несколько рублей.
    С: Сколько у вас?
    Л: Четырнадцать или пятнадцать.
    С: Вот десять рублей. Сейчас сколько у вас денег?
    Л: Не знаю, но сейчас у меня много. Большое спасибо.
    Только несколько – only a few
    Достаточно денег – enough money

    У вас есть пиво? – Do you have any beer?
    Да, есть. – Yes, I have some.
    Это пиво для вас. – This beer is for you.
    Для меня? – For me?
    Спросите! – Ask!
    Да, вино для вас. – Yes, the wine is for you.
    Вино для меня? – Is the wine for me?
    Вы хотите вина? – Do you want some wine?
    Сколько стоит пиво? – How much does a beer cost?
    Пиво стоит один рубль – A beer costs one ruble.
    А сколько стоит вино? – And how much does the wine cost?
    Я не могу. – I can’t.
    Я могу. – I can.
    Вы можете. – You can. [Note: может быть (maybe) = it can be]
    Вы можете что-нибудь выпить со мной? – Can you have something to drink with me?
    У вас есть вино? – Do you have any wine [note the есть]
    У вас нет вина? – You don’t have any wine?
    Сколько будеть два плюс два? – How much will two plus two be?
    Сейчас вы говорите с женщиной. – Now you’re speaking with the woman.
    Может быть, в семь часов? В семь, хорошо? – Maybe at seven o’clock? At seven, OK?
    Да, я могу в семь. – Yes, I can (do it) at seven.
    Вы можете купить вина для меня? – Can you buy some wine for me?
    Да, я могу купить вина для вас. – Yes, I can buy some wine for you.

    Open question: 'для' sounds different in the phrase 'для меня' than it does in 'для вас.' Is it just because of the following letter (м instead of в?) [STATUS: Answered - See this thread for an explanation

  17. #57
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Сейчас сколько у вас денег?

    Большое спасибо.
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Пиво стоит один рубль – A beer costs one ruble.
    НЕПРАВДА!

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Open question: 'для' sounds different in the phrase 'для меня' than it does in 'для вас.' Is it just because of the following letter (м instead of в?)
    Actually "для" should be unstressed, the "я" is pronounced like "и" or like "е" here ("л" is soft). And no, it shouldn't sound different in "для меня" and "для Вас" at all. The letters "м" and "в" don't play a part.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  18. #58
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Сейчас сколько у вас денег?

    Большое спасибо.
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Пиво стоит один рубль – A beer costs one ruble.
    НЕПРАВДА!
    What! You mean I can't get beer for a ruble (<.04 dollars)? And I was planning a trip to Moscow just for the cheap beer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Open question: 'для' sounds different in the phrase 'для меня' than it does in 'для вас.' Is it just because of the following letter (м instead of в?)
    Actually "для" should be unstressed, the "я" is pronounced like "и" or like "е" here ("л" is soft). And no, it shouldn't sound different in "для меня" and "для Вас" at all. The letters "м" and "в" don't play a part.
    Cпасибо Оля. I'll post a clip in the audio lounge so you can hear what I'm hearing. It truly sounded to me like the 'я' was stressed with вас when I heard it and unstressed with меня. I'll let you listen and tell me if (as is usually the case) I'm hearing it wrong or if it's something else.

  19. #59
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    7
    This is lesson 16. I'm all caught up now (meaning this is the lesson I'm currently listening to) so I'll be posting these less frequently now.

    Урок номер шестнадцать – Lesson Number Sixteen

    Слушайте этот разговор по телефону. – Listen to this telephone conversation.

    Л: Алло, Сергей. Это вы? Добрый вечер. Это Лена.
    С: Добрый вечер, Лена.
    Л: Скажите, Сергей, не хотели бы вы поужинать со мной?
    С: С удовольствием. Когда бы вы хотели поужинать? Сегодня не могу.
    Л: Может быть, завтра вечером, хорошо? В семь часов.
    С: Хорошо.
    Л: Тогда до завтра.
    С: До завтра, Лена.

    Что это? – What is that?
    Сколько это стоит? – How much does that cost?
    Я могу дать вам несколько долларов. – I can give you a few dollars.
    Это много. – That’s a lot.
    Это много денег. – That’s a lot of money.
    Это слишком много. – That’s too much.
    Я не собираюсь дать вам денег. – I’m not going to give you any money.
    У вас слишком много денег. – You have too much money.
    Сколько у вас денег? – How much money do you have?
    Двадцать – twenty
    У вас есть двадцать долларов. – You have twenty dollars.
    Двадцать четыре – twenty-four
    У меня есть двадцать пять долларов. – I have twenty-five dollars.
    Тридцать – thirty
    Достаточно – enough (da-sta-tish-na)
    Это (не) достаточно – That’s (not) enough.
    Сорок – forty
    Вы можете дать мне сорок семь рублей? – Can you give me forty-seven rubles?
    Я хотела бы сорок восемь рублей. – I would like forty-eight rubles.
    Я (не) могу дать вам двадцать восемь рублей. – I can(’t) give you twenty-eight rubles.
    Сколько вы хотите рублей? – How many rubles do you want?
    У меня нет. – I don’t have any.
    Сейчас немного арифметики по-русски – Now, some arithmetic in Russian.
    С меня достаточно! – Enough for me!

  20. #60
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    С удовольствием.
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Что это? – What is that?
    By the way, it's pronounced just with the only one stressed syllable ([штоэта])

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Сейчас немного арифметики (g.c.) по-русски – Now, some arithmetic in Russian.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pimsleur - Level 2
    By fortheether in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 195
    Last Post: December 31st, 2012, 01:33 PM
  2. Pimsleur - Level 3
    By fortheether in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 179
    Last Post: September 15th, 2011, 04:25 PM
  3. phonetic transcriptions of Pimsleur level 1 lessons 1-10
    By SoftPretzel in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 24th, 2010, 04:28 PM
  4. Pimsleur Level 1 Text
    By haelen in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 26th, 2008, 07:18 AM
  5. level tests
    By Lt. Columbo in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 5th, 2006, 05:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary