Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 74

Thread: It's on the(a) table.

  1. #1
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern Siberia
    Posts
    122
    Rep Power
    8

    It's on the(a) table.

    The question to native English speakers.
    Which article would you use in this case?

    - Where is my book?
    - It's on the(a) small table in the room.

    If both speakers know that there are more then one small table in the room.
    If my post contains errors of any kind, I'd appreciate anyone setting me straight.

  2. #2
    Почётный участник emeraldeyez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    133
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    The question to native English speakers.
    Which article would you use in this case?

    - Where is my book?
    - It's on the(a) small table in the room.

    If both speakers know that there are more then one small table in the room.
    It's on a small table in the room.

    Using "a" is referencing that the person realizes one must look on ALL the small tables in the room to find the book.
    Using "the" denotes that it would be only one small table in the room.

  3. #3
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern Siberia
    Posts
    122
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    emeraldeyez, does the following phrase sound natural for you (a native english speaker)?

    It doesn't listen logical to me.

    Is listen a normal word in this context?
    If my post contains errors of any kind, I'd appreciate anyone setting me straight.

  4. #4
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    США
    Posts
    2,284
    Rep Power
    13

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    emeraldeyez, does the following phrase sound natural for you (a native english speaker)?

    It doesn't sound logical to me.

    Is listen the normal word in this context? No
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  5. #5
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern Siberia
    Posts
    122
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    sperk, one person claimes he ran into such an expression on the internet.
    That's why I asked.

    And yes, articles have never been my strong side. Thanks for the correction.
    If my post contains errors of any kind, I'd appreciate anyone setting me straight.

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    США
    Posts
    2,284
    Rep Power
    13

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    sperk, one person claims he ran into such an expression on the internet.
    That's why I asked.

    And yes, articles have never been my strong side. Thanks for the correction.
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  7. #7
    Почётный участник emeraldeyez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    133
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    sperk, one person claimes he ran into such an expression on the internet.
    That's why I asked.

    And yes, articles have never been my strong side. Thanks for the correction.

    What type of expression?

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    16

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    it listens well. That expression.

    No, it does not sit well with me either and I would never say "it listens well". A book "reads well" but neither a play nor a line of thought "listens well."

  9. #9
    Почётный участник emeraldeyez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    133
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    it listens well. That expression.

    No, it does not sit well with me either and I would never say "it listens well". A book "reads well" but neither a play nor a line of thought "listens well."

    Actually I can beg to differ here. While that phrase is not common ... I have heard it expressed that way.

    For instance ... when referring to listening to a piece of music or a reading done out loud. One MAY (though not often) state "IT listens well" the IT in this case being the passage being read or the music being played, thereby actually lending itself to an easy listen to a person or group of people. Because there is a case that "something does not listen well" too. Like a bad piece of music or a passage that the wording makes no sense. So "it" does not listen well on the ears.

    Does this make sense?

    It is an antiquated way of phrasing something. (very outdated, but not entirely unheard of.)

  10. #10
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    Posts
    653
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by emeraldeyez
    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    No, it does not sit well with me either and I would never say "it listens well".
    Actually I can beg to differ here. While that phrase is not common ... I have heard it expressed that way.
    I have to agree with Chaika here. “It listens well” is an error if the person is wanting to express the idea of “It sounds good” or “It sounds correct.” “It listens well” is not a sample sentence I would ever give to a beginning student of English because the context in which it can be used is very limited. I have taught at three large American universities, and I have never once in my life heard it.

  11. #11
    Почётный участник emeraldeyez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    133
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by doninphxaz
    “It listens well” is not a sample sentence I would ever give to a beginning student of English because the context in which it can be used is very limited.
    I agree with this statement.


    Let me state, I respect that you have taught a 3 large American Universities.

    Thing is ... I HAVE heard this statement used, actually I have heard it used by a professor at John's Hopkins University durning a lecture. (But I am sure we know how long winded some of them get ....LOL )

    But let me reiterate ... I believe the statement is antiquated and outdated. I have heard such a statment used perhaps twice ever. While it is not something I would ever use in my vocabulary or even teach it to someone. As I too find it just does not sound right. But the statement has been known to be used. LOL


  12. #12
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    305
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Yes, I've heard it too, and here are some examples:
    I've enjoyed the CD because it listens well, there is enough variety to keep my interest, and the song content covers a lot of ground.
    http://cdbaby.com/cd/junedreammakers
    It listens well looped and low, but give it at least one loud, full attention go, for the sake of the dynamics and structure.
    http://www.thirdfactory.net/lipstick.html
    "It listens well, Aunt Biny. It sounds perfectly enticing. If I read it in a book I'd lap it up. . ."
    Aldrich, Bess Streeter, The Rim of the Prairie (U of Nebraska Press 1966) http://tinyurl.com/d8qgv8

    The saying comes from Germans:
    Nor could all the ardor of the professional patriots obliterate that German influence which has fastened upon the American yes something of the quality of ja, or prevent the constant appearance of such German loan-forms as “it listens well” and “I want out.” Many American loan-words are of startlingly outlandish origin.
    Mencken, Henry Louis, The American Language 200 (1921) http://tinyurl.com/cn94k2 http://www.bartleby.com/185/28.html
    Such expressions as gabfest, plunderbund, it listens well, bum, dumb (in the senses of stupid), come from the Germans. . .
    The Federal Writers' Project, New York City: Vol 1, New York City Guide 112 (1939) http://tinyurl.com/dkydym

  13. #13
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mowcow, Russia
    Posts
    1,957
    Rep Power
    12

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by doninphxaz
    “It listens well” is an error if the person is wanting to express the idea of “It sounds good” or “It sounds correct.”
    "It sounds correct"? No, definitely not. But it sort of makes sense if someone is speaking about a new album of a pop group, in the same way as when people say "this book reads well". While it may be not correct from the strict grammatical standpoint, people do use such expressions now and then.

  14. #14
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern Siberia
    Posts
    122
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    So too do demands for forms of "proof" which the theory of evolution predicts will never be observed,...

    Everything seems to be ok with this phrase, exept for has been bothering me... Shouldn't there be that in it's place?
    If my post contains errors of any kind, I'd appreciate anyone setting me straight.

  15. #15
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    So too do demands for forms of "proof" which the theory of evolution predicts will never be observed,...

    Everything seems to be ok with this phrase, exept for has been bothering me... Shouldn't there be that in it's place?
    Not if demand is a noun. In which case, 'a demand for [something]' is correct. You can demand (verb) something, but your action is a demand for something. Does that make sense?
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  16. #16
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern Siberia
    Posts
    122
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Not if demand is a noun. In which case, 'a demand for [something]' is correct. You can demand (verb) something, but your action is a demand for something. Does that make sense?
    I fully agree with you in that. The construction 'a demand for [something]' is absolutely correct. But what makes me wince is that the [something] here is a subordinate clause with predication!

    If simplified the sentence would be like this:

    So too do demands for forms of "proof" will never be observed.

    Does it sound normal? I doubt it.
    If my post contains errors of any kind, I'd appreciate anyone setting me straight.

  17. #17
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mowcow, Russia
    Posts
    1,957
    Rep Power
    12

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    The "simplified" version is definitely not okay, and its meaning is not the same. It could be re-written as follows:
    Demands for forms of "proof" will never be observed either.
    Your original sentence stated a different thing.
    But, anyway, "demands for" sounds just fine.
    Для примера, по-русски полная версия звучала бы примерно вот так: "То же самое верно в отношении требований предоставить определённые виды доказательств, которые, как предсказывает теория эволюции, никогда не будут наблюдаться".
    Нормальная - с точки зрения формальной грамматики - конструкция.
    Теперь ты взял и "упростил" её, выкинув серединку:
    "То же самое верно в отношении требований предоставить определённые виды доказательств никогда не будут наблюдаться".
    Что получилось? Конец предложения ("никогда не будут наблюдаться") никак не связан грамматически с началом. Вот то же самое имеет место в твоей упрощённой версии. Но проблема связана вовсе не с "demands for" - тут как раз всё нормально.

  18. #18
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern Siberia
    Posts
    122
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    translationsnmru, спасибо, теперь ясно.
    So too do demands for forms of "proof" which [as the theory of evolution predicts] will never be observed,...

    С точки зрения грамматики понятно.
    Но теперь не понятен смысл высказывания....
    Ну да ладно, это другая тема.
    If my post contains errors of any kind, I'd appreciate anyone setting me straight.

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,216
    Rep Power
    13

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    emeraldeyez, does the following phrase sound natural for you (a native english speaker)?

    It doesn't listen logical to me.

    Is listen a normal word in this context?

    The normal word is "sound". While some people may have heard "listen" used in this way, it is definitely not the normal word in this context.

  20. #20
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Central Russia
    Posts
    858
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: It's on the(a) table.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    So too do demands for forms of "proof" will never be observed.

    Does it sound normal? I doubt it.
    It does not make sense at all. You did not provide the context
    The second way to think you've disproved the theory of evolution is to fail to grasp its consequences, or to ascribe to it consequences it does not have. Arguments of the form "I can't see how X evolved", usually fall into this class. So too do demands for forms of "proof" which the theory of evolution predicts will never be observed, e.g. "a cat turning into a dog", and such similar fatuities
    according to which in your initial sentence do stands for usually fall into this class, so in its full form the sentence should be So demands for forms of "proof" which the theory of evolution predicts will never be observed, e.g. "a cat turning into a dog", and such similar fatuities usually fall into this class too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Selexin
    translationsnmru, спасибо, теперь ясно.
    So too do demands for forms of "proof" which [as the theory of evolution predicts] will never be observed,...
    С точки зрения грамматики понятно.
    Но теперь не понятен смысл высказывания....
    Ну да ладно, это другая тема.
    Без предыдущего предложения смысла нет, а с ним – другое дело.
    Аргументы типа «Я не понимаю, как эволюционировал Х» обычно вписываются в эту категорию. Так же как и требования предоставить определённые виды доказательств, которых, как предсказывает теория эволюции, не может быть в принципе, например: «кошку превращающуюся в собаку» и тому подобную чушь.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Is there pronouncing table for ъ?
    By nadavvin in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: July 16th, 2007, 08:27 AM
  2. Help with table manners
    By zakuski in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: June 9th, 2006, 04:01 PM
  3. How to translate "water table" into Russian?
    By lather in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 5th, 2006, 01:39 PM
  4. At the table
    By Knave in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 13th, 2004, 08:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary