Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 37

Thread: Unstressed vowels

  1. #1
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9

    Unstressed vowels

    Hi all,

    I know this topic comes up regularly, but I've got a question. The answer might be useful for other learners as well.

    I know, for example, that "о" is pronounced like "а" when it isn't stressed, and "я" and "е" like "и". My understanding is that because of this phenomenon "еще" could be written like "ище" and it would be pronounced exactly the same. A strict interpretation of this rule would mean that "язык" would sound the same as "изык", correct?

    I ask because even though I know the rule, I can't completely bring myself to observe it. For instance, I still say "ya" slightly when I say "язык".

    Is the rule so hard and fast that I should make myself say "изык"? Also, does the rule apply to words like "тщеславия" or "общения"?

    TIA
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  2. #2
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Unstressed vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    "еще" could be written like "ище" and it would be pronounced exactly the same. A strict interpretation of this rule would mean that "язык" would sound the same as "изык", correct?
    I don't agree...
    I pronounce язык as "йизык, that's unambiguously.
    As for ещё - yes, sometimes, in a very quick speech I can pronounce it like ищё, but usually I still pronounce the initial й, so it sounds йищё for me.

    So I'd say that an unsressed "я" (and "е") is и only if it goes after a consonant, but not in a beginning of a word.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: Unstressed vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    I ask because even though I know the rule, I can't completely bring myself to observe it. For instance, I still say "ya" slightly when I say "язык".
    Is the rule so hard and fast that I should make myself say "изык"?
    Olya is right, also a lot of people say "язык", "ямщик", etc. with a slight (or not so slight) "йа"="я" (or in rare cases even slight "йе") sounds, so I don't see a problem here. It sounds rather natural, unlike mispronounced unstressed "o".

  4. #4
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Unstressed vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Also, does the rule apply to words like "тщеславия" or "общения"?

    TIA
    There is a quite noticeable difference between "говорить о тщеславии" and "без тщеславия".

    What is TIA?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: Unstressed vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    What is TIA?
    Thanks in advance, i think. )

  6. #6
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9
    Oh, that's good news! Thank you both.

    Olya, thanks for the rule: after a consonant, but not at the beginning of a word, or after another vowel. That makes sense, and sounds natural.

    BTW, I'm planning on buying a computer microphone so that I can have my pronunciation checked by the board. I'm sure there are things that I could improve.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  7. #7
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Unstressed vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    There is a quite noticeable difference between "говорить о тщеславии" and "без тщеславия".

    What is TIA?
    Спасибо заранее.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    To be honest, "тщеславия" sounds very often (in a quick speech) as "тщеславиа" or something like that, in other words - without й. I think it's because the word is long (ok, it's not short ) and because this syllable is "заударный" (it follows a stressed syllable, so such syllables often are not pronounced distinct).
    But anyway it doesn't sound like it is ии at the end.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  9. #9
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    To be honest, "тщеславия" sounds very often (in a quick speech) as "тщеславиа" or something like that, in other words - without й. I think it's because the word is long (ok, it's not short ) and because this syllable is "заударный" (it follows a stressed syllable, so such syllables often are not pronounced distinct).
    But anyway it doesn't sound like it is ии at the end.
    Thanks, that helps. I assume you have a Moscow accent (judging from your favorite football team). Do the other major dialects in Russia follow a similar pattern?
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  10. #10
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    I assume you have a Moscow accent (judging from your favorite football team). Do the other major dialects in Russia follow a similar pattern?
    I don't have any accent ...
    I think all Russians pronounce these words approximately equall.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    other major dialects in Russia
    Which ones do you know? I know only говоры. But it is not the same as dialects... All Russians speak Russian approximately equall.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  11. #11
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    I don't have any accent ...
    Да, это точно москвичка.

    Which ones do you know? I know only говоры. But it is not the same as dialects... All Russians speak Russian approximately equall.
    I understand that. I was using "dialect" loosely -- in the colloquial rather than linguistic way. I just mean accents, like the difference between speech in St. Petersburg and in Moscow.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Lampada
    А чего только я записываюсь? Девочки, доставайте-ка ваши микрофончики!
    Oka-ay.

    A few sentences about "Vanity Fair" ("Ярмарка тщеславия"): http://sayandpost.com/r7xiiy3jx1.mp3 (92 kb).
    Tempo of speach: medium.
    Bonus: a lot of "я" sounds and words, ending on "ия" (do they sound like "иа"? Who knows).

    Вершиной творчества английского писателя, журналиста и графика стал роман "Ярмарка тщеславия". Все персонажи романа - положительные и отрицательные - вовлечены, по словам автора, в "вечный круг горя и страдания". Насыщенный событиями, богатый тонкими наблюдениями быта своего времени, проникнутый иронией и сарказмом, роман "Ярмарка тщеславия" занял почетное место в ряду шедевров мировой литературы.

    PS.
    a) sorry for the quality of sound, I have a crappy microphone
    b) I'm from Ukraine, but I believe there are no major differences in pronunciation among native speakers (+1 to Olya).

  13. #13
    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    СССР -> США
    Posts
    17,627
    Rep Power
    31
    gRomoZekочка, качество записи достаточно хорошее, только, по-моему, ты слишком быстро (для изучающих русский) этот текст проговорила.
    Я тоже с Украины, так что придётся нашим студентам говорить с украинским акцентом.
    "...Важно, чтобы форум оставался местом, объединяющим людей, для которых интересны русский язык и культура. ..." - MasterАdmin (из переписки)



  14. #14
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Lampada
    gRomoZekочка, качество записи достаточно хорошее, только, по-моему, ты слишком быстро (для изучающих русский) этот текст проговорила.
    Дело в том, что когда я говорила медленнее, я была похожа на диктора телевидения. Очень уж все четко слышно. Непорядок.

    А тут я старалась говорить приближенно к повседневной речи, все-таки люди в обычном разгворе часто невнятно говорят и окончания проглатывают, пусть Матроскин_кот привыкает.
    Может быть, и не очень получилось. Все-таки когда в микрофон говоришь, это как-то напрягает.

    Я тоже с Украины, так что придётся нашим студентам говорить с украинским акцентом.
    Надеюсь, обойдется как-нибудь.

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    16
    I should say something here, since I have studied the Russian dialects. There are all kinds of variations, and you should stick with the one used in Moscow. In terms of phonetics, this dialect is marked by 1) akanie аканье (unstressed syllables spelled with A and O are pronounced as some variation of the phoneme /a/, not as /o/ which is a northern dialect phenomenon; 2) ikanie иканье (unstressed syllables spelled with Е and Я are pronounced /i/; 3) Г is pronounced "hard" not a fricative, as it is in the South. I think those are the three main points of distinction.

    The three major classifications are:
    North: unstressed O is /o/, Г is hard.
    Central: unstressed O is /a/, Г is hard.
    South: unstressed O is /a/, Г is fricative.

    Then there are other odd things like pronunciation канешна and што for конечно and что. Also, vowels retain their unweakened forms a little more at morpheme boundaries (e.g. at the end or beginning of a word). Weakening is also affected by surrounding consonants. For example, in пяти (stress on final syllable) the sound represented by Я is pronounced /i/ but in пятсот (stress also on final syllable) it is more mid-range, close to /e/.

    There are morphological distinctions too, but I have just dealt with phonetic ones. One example of a morphological difference is in the third person singular form of endstressed verbs. In the central and northern dialects we have -ёт but in the south we have -еть. With no /o/ and a soft /t'/.

    But nowadays literacy and TV have raised their ugly head, and with it, entropy. The dialects are gradually fading, or maybe not so gradually, similar to what's happening in the US.

  16. #16
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    I just mean accents, like the difference between speech in St. Petersburg and in Moscow.
    Честное слово, Я НЕ ЗНАЮ, что такое "разница между московской и петербургской речью".
    Для меня между ними нет никакой разницы. Если я встречу в Москве петербуржца, я НИКОГДА не угадаю по его манере говорить, что он - из Петербурга.
    Да больше того, я сама раньше некоторое время жила в Петербурге, и когда я приехала в Москву, никакой разницы в произношении я не заметила, так же как и по моей речи никто ни разу не заподозрил, что я из Петербурга.

    Все эти разговоры про "московский", "петербургский" и другие якобы "акценты" - сильно преувеличены.
    Да, есть некоторые петербургские словечки (которые употребляют далеко не все петербуржцы), но! разницы в произношении НЕТ! И вообще не верь, когда читаешь или слышишь про русские "акценты" или "диалекты".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  17. #17
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    I should say something here, since I have studied the Russian dialects. There are all kinds of variations, and you should stick with the one used in Moscow.
    Thanks for your post -- it was informative. The best part about it, though, was when you said that literacy has raised it's "ugly head". That still cracks me up!

    I might have to use it as my sig
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  18. #18
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    and you should stick with the one used in Moscow.
    ... or in Saint-Petersburg.
    I never noticed any defference between the mythical "St-Petersburg dialect" and the Moscow one.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  19. #19
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    [Честное слово, Я НЕ ЗНАЮ, что такое "разница между московской и петербургской речью".
    Для меня между ними нет никакой разницы.
    Ну, хорошо -- как скажешь. Но для меня это что-то удивительное. Первый раз я это слышу.

    Когда я был в Украине все говорили, что очень легко отличить людей друг от друга по акцентом. Они не говорили, что акценты о-о-очень сильные, а просто заметны. Даже продемонстрировали "московский" и "питербургский", а также говорили, что свой украинский акцент сразу выдает их русским.

    Я не спорю с тобой, просто говорю о том, что я слышал.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  20. #20
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Когда я был на Украине, все говорили, что очень легко отличить людей друг от друга по акцентам. Они не говорили, что акценты о-о-очень сильные, а просто заметны. Даже продемонстрировали "московский" и "петербургский", а также говорили, что их украинский акцент сразу выдает их русским.
    Мне и правда очень странно слышать, что кто-то смог "продемонстрировать" московский и петербургский акценты - я бы хотела это услышать. Скорее всего, это была утрированная пародия.

    Что касается украинского акцента - все-таки украинский - это другой язык, и хотя многие украинцы говорят на русском с детства, все-таки в данном случае есть смысл говорить именно об акценте. Да, часто по речи человека можно услышать, что он с Украины (но не всегда), но также вполне может оказаться, что он откуда-нибудь с Брянщины или просто откуда-то, как говорят, "из деревни". Например, в записях Лампады и Громозеки я действительно слышу легкий украинский говор, а точнее - небольшое "яканье". Но вот фрикативного "г" я там не услышала.
    Украинский русский - это отдельный разговор. Так же, как вообще русский в бывших союзных республиках. В то же время многие украинцы и белорусы могут говорить на чистом "московском" русском языке, и никто никогда не догадается, что они приехали из Украины или Белоруссии.

    Про то, что написал chaika, я могу сказать, что все эти особенности произношения действительно сущестсвуют, но это не значит, что абсолютно все жители Костромы или Ярославля "окают", и что абсолютно все на юге произносят фрикативное "г". Это вовсе не так.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Falling vowels
    By radomir in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 9th, 2010, 06:16 AM
  2. identifying stressed and unstressed vowels
    By georgegll in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: November 20th, 2008, 01:31 AM
  3. Seryoga Nasalizes his Vowels
    By Trzeci_Wymiar in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 16th, 2006, 08:24 PM
  4. unstressed a
    By jz12 in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: January 23rd, 2006, 02:44 AM
  5. Iotated vowels
    By mp510 in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: March 30th, 2005, 07:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary