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Thread: What other languages have CASES?

  1. #21
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    That's interesting. When you see the word 'case' you tend to assume the worst

  2. #22
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    Romanian has 5 cases though for nouns there are only 3 different forms AFAIK (nominative/accusative, genetive/dative, vocative).

  3. #23
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    Not all languages have declension classes but all languages have cases (properly case forms—cases are the specific roles of nouns and expressions with substantival force, and those nouns and expressions themselves). Turkish and Finnish are agglutinating languages, so their case-forming suffixes vary only according to phonetic considerations (e.g. vowel harmony and voicing assimilation of consonants), not according to declension patterns.

  4. #24
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    Hebrew does not have cases either.
    Не плюй в колодец, пригодится водицы, напиться.

  5. #25
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    Re: German

    Quote Originally Posted by mp510
    German is a case based language. Only from what I have seen it is the definite and indefinite articles that morphs as opposed to the noun in Russian. Also, changes only occur with the masculine definite and indefinite article, der and ein such as
    Ich habe einen Hund or Ich sehe den Hund.
    Ich habe einen Hund means I have a dog.
    Iche sehe den Hun means I see the dog.

    Kein also is affected.
    example: Ich habe keinen Hund I don't have a dog.
    Certain nouns change as well (some masculine nouns ending in -e or even with no ending):

    ein Knabe, eines Knabens, einem Knaben, einen Knaben
    Anatoli - Анатолий - أناتولي - 阿纳托利 - アナトーリー - 아나톨리

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by fantom605
    Quote Originally Posted by Darobat
    Finnish has 13-15 cases depending on your dialect.
    Боже! Luckily I didn't meet a hot Finnish woman!!!!! :P
    -Fantom
    Although Finnish language has more cases - they are much easier than Russian. Don't remember all the rules/cases
    e.g.
    Suomi (Finland) - Suomessa - in Finland, Suomesta - from Finland

    Japanese has sort of cases:

    watashi (私)
    watashi-wa and watashi-ga - Nominative
    watashi-no Genitive
    watashi-ni Dative
    watashi-wo Accusative
    watashi-yori - than me (comparison)
    watashi-kara - from me
    watashi-mo - including me, me too
    watashi-made - up-to me
    Anatoli - Анатолий - أناتولي - 阿纳托利 - アナトーリー - 아나톨리

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    polish has 7 cases. actually id dare to say most of the slavic languages have cases.
    Yes, except for Bulgarian and Macedonian. They have no cases. Another important difference - these 2 languages are the only ones among Slavic languages to have the notion of a definite article.

    The 7th case is Vocative(?) used in addressing. Russian has only some attavisms of this form.

    See the following examples of vocatives in Russian:

    бог - боже (God) (quite common - Боже мой!- My God!)
    отец - отче (Father) (used in prayers)

    Vocative is quite common in Ukrainian - мамо, дiду, хлопче, etc.
    Anatoli - Анатолий - أناتولي - 阿纳托利 - アナトーリー - 아나톨리

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