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Thread: What other languages have CASES?

  1. #1
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    What other languages have CASES?

    I studied French, Spanish and Japanese and none of these languages had cases like in the Russian language. Is Russian unique or are there other languages out there that use cases?
    Какая разница, умереть богатым или бедным?

    Какой толк от богатства если ты не счастлив.

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    I'd wager all or most slavic languages use cases. I know Bulgarian does, and I'm almost positive German (although it's not a slavic language) uses cases also....
    -Fantom
    "Alright, brain, I don't like you and you don't like me, so let's just figure this out and I'll get back to killing you with beer."

  3. #3
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    Cases are certainly not unique to Russian. Greek and German have cases, and Latin had 6 cases.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyphyr
    Cases are certainly not unique to Russian. Greek and German have cases, and Latin had 6 cases.
    right, I learned Latin in University, they got 6 cases, German got 4, I learned that language as well. Not that I speak any of them.
    DO NOT READ MY SIGNATURE!

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    Well, English does have 4 cases for pronouns and 2 for nouns. I read that old English had 4 cases for nouns.

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    Most languages with the exception of Chinese and Japanese have some form of cases.
    Я знаю
    Что делаю
    Вилкою
    Пирогу

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    Last edited by Darobat on Mon Mar 5, 1759 1:19 am; edited 243 times in total

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    I think Finnish and Hungarian have a really large number of cases. Can't remember exactly how many, but when I read about it, I felt a whole lot better about learning Russian

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    Finnish has 13-15 cases depending on your dialect.
    Я знаю
    Что делаю
    Вилкою
    Пирогу

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    Last edited by Darobat on Mon Mar 5, 1759 1:19 am; edited 243 times in total

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darobat
    Finnish has 13-15 cases depending on your dialect.
    Боже! Luckily I didn't meet a hot Finnish woman!!!!! :P
    -Fantom
    "Alright, brain, I don't like you and you don't like me, so let's just figure this out and I'll get back to killing you with beer."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darobat
    Most languages with the exception of Chinese and Japanese have some form of cases.
    Turk languages, like Turkish, Uzbek, Tartat etc do not have cases.
    DO NOT READ MY SIGNATURE!

  11. #11
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    Well, saying that Japanese or Turkish languages don't have cases may or may not be correct, depending on how you define case. According to Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary, case is:

    3 a an inflectional form indicating the sense relation (as that of subject, object, possessor, thing possessed) to another word in the context.

    So, do Japanese words have inflectional forms? It depends on wether you regard suffixes -ni, -no, -ga etc as suffixes (which is the traditional approach of Russian and Soviet linguistics) or as particles. For me, Japanese most certainly has cases.

    As far as Turkish languages are concerned, I don't know what Uzbek or Tatar grammarians have to say on the subject. Hoever, all Kazakh grammars that I have seen, use term "септiк" -- e.g. жатыс септiк, барыс септiк, табыс септiк (местный, направительный, винительный падежи) etc.

    Example:

    Мектеп -- a school
    Мектепте -- in a school
    Мектепке -- to a school

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    I think that all Slavic languages exept Macedonian have cases. Serbian and Croatian have 7 cases.
    Не могу све битке да се добијају. Рат не добија онај који оће све битке да добије него онај који уме паметно да их губи.
    Драгослав Михајловић

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    Dutch, has cases,... but they are not realy used anymore. Only in some expresions.
    Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

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    Quote Originally Posted by translations.nm.ru
    Well, saying that Japanese or Turkish languages don't have cases may or may not be correct, depending on how you define case. According to Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary, case is:

    3 a an inflectional form indicating the sense relation (as that of subject, object, possessor, thing possessed) to another word in the context.

    So, do Japanese words have inflectional forms? It depends on wether you regard suffixes -ni, -no, -ga etc as suffixes (which is the traditional approach of Russian and Soviet linguistics) or as particles. For me, Japanese most certainly has cases.

    As far as Turkish languages are concerned, I don't know what Uzbek or Tatar grammarians have to say on the subject. Hoever, all Kazakh grammars that I have seen, use term "септiк" -- e.g. жатыс септiк, барыс септiк, табыс септiк (местный, направительный, винительный падежи) etc.

    Example:

    Мектеп -- a school
    Мектепте -- in a school
    Мектепке -- to a school
    Kazakh language is turkish as well, so, probably you are right. I do not speak neither Uzbek nor Tartar.
    DO NOT READ MY SIGNATURE!

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    polish has 7 cases. actually id dare to say most of the slavic languages have cases.

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    German

    German is a case based language. Only from what I have seen it is the definite and indefinite articles that morphs as opposed to the noun in Russian. Also, changes only occur with the masculine definite and indefinite article, der and ein such as
    Ich habe einen Hund or Ich sehe den Hund.
    Ich habe einen Hund means I have a dog.
    Iche sehe den Hun means I see te dog.

    Kein also is affected.
    example: Ich habe keinen Hund I don't have a dog.

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    Re: German

    Quote Originally Posted by mp510
    German is a case based language. Only from what I have seen it is the definite and indefinite articles that morphs as opposed to the noun in Russian. Also, changes only occur with the masculine definite and indefinite article, der and ein such as
    Ich habe einen Hund or Ich sehe den Hund.
    Ich habe einen Hund means I have a dog.
    Iche sehe den Hun means I see te dog.

    Kein also is affected.
    example: Ich habe keinen Hund I don't have a dog.
    Not exactly. In the accusative case masculine words are the only ones affected, but in dative and genitive feminine and neutrum nouns are affected to, e.g.

    Ich spiele mit dem Kind
    Ich helfe der Frau

    Your sentences are completely correct though
    blame Canada

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    Re: German

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamion
    Quote Originally Posted by mp510
    German is a case based language. Only from what I have seen it is the definite and indefinite articles that morphs as opposed to the noun in Russian. Also, changes only occur with the masculine definite and indefinite article, der and ein such as
    Ich habe einen Hund or Ich sehe den Hund.
    Ich habe einen Hund means I have a dog.
    Iche sehe den Hun means I see te dog.

    Kein also is affected.
    example: Ich habe keinen Hund I don't have a dog.
    Not exactly. In the accusative case masculine words are the only ones affected, but in dative and genitive feminine and neutrum nouns are affected to, e.g.

    Ich spiele mit dem Kind
    Ich helfe der Frau

    Your sentences are completely correct though
    Thanks. i didn't know that!

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    Finnish, Hungarian and Estonian (all in the same family) have some 20 odd cases each.

    They are easier to use than Russian cases however.

    If I use Hungarian as an example:

    Instead of using prepositions, endings are added to nouns.
    E.g.
    Magyarorsz
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

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