Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 180

Thread: Pimsleur - Level 3

  1. #61
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Here's the ninth lesson. There's one line in the dialog that I can't make out, so I uploaded it in an MP3 file. If you can tell me what the endings are on номер and гостиница I'd appreciate it.

    Thanks,

    Grogs

    Урок номер восемь – Lesson Number Eight

    А: Татьяна, у меня скоро будет важная встреча в Петербурге. Мне надо сейчас заказать номер в гостинице?
    Б: Ты знаешь, мой коллега недавно был там.
    А: А ты не знаешь, где он жил?
    Б: Я думаю, в гостинице “Нева”.

    У тебя с собой есть кредитная карточка? – Do you have a credit card with you?
    Я могу заплатить. – I can pay.
    Я могу заплатить за номера. – I can pay for the rooms.
    Где вы припарковались? – Where did you park?
    Я припарковался перед домом. – I parked in front of the building.
    Я приехал в Россию месяц назад. – I arrived in Russia a month ago.
    Где вы жили в Петербурге? – Where did you stay in Petersburg?
    Это было два года назад. – That was two years ago.
    Я припарковался рядом с домом. – I parked next to the building.

  2. #62
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,073
    Rep Power
    24
    "Мне надо сейчас заказать номер в гостинице"

    Ты знаешь, мой коллега недАвно был там. (or was it "не так давнО"?)

  3. #63
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Б: Я думаю, в гостинице “Нева”.

    Я приехал в Россию месяц назад. – I arrived in Russia a month ago.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  4. #64
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Привет! Rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated. I've just finished my term-ends and I'm 12 credit hours closer to being a doctor. I haven't completely let my Russian slip in the interim, but I have been too busy to properly transcribe the Pimsleur lessons, so I've got some catching up to do. Here's the first of them, Lesson nine:

    Thanks,

    Grogs

    Урок номер девять – Lesson Number Nine

    А: Сергей, вы знаете, моя машина сейчас не работает!
    Б: Это очень плохо.
    А: Да, и мне скоро надо вернуться домой.
    Б: Как я могу вам помочь?
    А: Может быть, вы можете отвезти меня домой?
    Б: Да, конечно. Подождите, пожалуйста. Я припарковался на улице рядом с домом.
    А: Большое спасибо.

    Я не знаю, может ли он заплатить за машину. – I don’t know whether he can pay for the car.
    Я не знаю, работает ли он. – I don’t know whether it (telephone) works.
    Давай пойдём в парк. – Let’s go to the park.
    Давай сначала выпьем кофе. – First, let’s have some coffee.
    Где стоит твоя машина? – Where is your car parked?
    Моя машина стоит рядом с домом\рестораном\кафе. – My car is parked next to the building\restaurant\cafe.
    Я хотела бы тебе показать книгу. – I’d like to show you a book.
    Я её купила в прошлом месяце. – I bought it last month.

  5. #65
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    А: Сергей, вы знаете, моя машина сейчас не работает!
    Б: Это очень плохо.
    А: Да, и мне скоро надо вернуться домой.
    Б: Как я могу вам помочь?
    А: Может быть, вы можете отвезти меня домой?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  6. #66
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Спасибо большое, Оля. Вот следующий урок:

    Урок номер десять – Lesson Number Ten

    А: Сергей, ты не помнишь, где стоит машина?
    Б: Конечно помню. Она стоит перед домом рядом с кафе.
    А: Извини, но я не вижу.
    Б: Машина не на улице?
    А: Сергей, я вижу только такси. Давай туда поедем на автобусе.

    Машина работала месяц назад. – The car was working a month ago.
    Давай пойдём туда пешком. – Let’s go there on foot.
    Сначала мне надо в банк. – First, I need (to go) to the bank.
    Мы собираемся пойти туда пешком? – Are we going to go there on foot?
    Мне кажется, что сейчас уже поздно. – It seems to me that now it’s already late.
    Летом магазины открыты. – In the summer, the stores are open.
    Летом музей открыт до десяти. – In the summer, the museum is open until ten.
    У вас красивая квартира. – You have a beautiful apartment.
    У нас маленькая квартира – We have a small apartment.
    В прошлом месяце мы с мужем были в Москве. – Last month, my husband and I were in Moscow.
    Там у нас была большая квартира. – There, we had a big apartment.
    Сегодня праздник. – Today is a holiday.

  7. #67
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Б: Машина не на улице? the sentence is very strange in this context...
    А: Сергей, я вижу только такси. Давай туда поедем на автобусе.

    Летом магазины открыты. – In the summer, the stores are open. А зимой закрыты?? А, ну конечно, зимой же русские спят в берлогах...
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  8. #68
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Б: Машина не на улице? the sentence is very strange in this context...
    Well, the whole conversation is a bit surreal. Hmm, the car is missing. Should we call the police? Nah, we'll just take the bus instead. If my car was stolen I'd be freaking out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    А: Сергей, я вижу только такси. Давай туда поедем на автобусе.

    Летом магазины открыты. – In the summer, the stores are open. А зимой закрыты?? А, ну конечно, зимой же русские спят в берлогах...
    Does that last bit translate to 'hibernate'?

    We have lots of shops in the U.S. which are seasonal, for example in towns on the ocean get lots of tourists in the Summer months and virtually none in the Winter. Similarly, there are towns with shops that cater to skiers which are only open in the Winter.

  9. #69
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,073
    Rep Power
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Does that last bit translate to 'hibernate'?
    Yes, it's kind of allusion to bears "sleeping" in their dens in winter and can be translated as "hibernate".

    спать ~ to hibernate
    (зимняя) спячка = hibernation
    берлога = bear's den

  10. #70
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Does that last bit translate to 'hibernate'?
    Yes, it's kind of allusion to bears "sleeping" in their dens in winter and can be translated as "hibernate".

    спать ~ to hibernate
    (зимняя) спячка = hibernation
    берлога = bear's den
    Спасибо, гРомоЗека.

    It's good to know that my intuition was correct. I didn't think that Russians were literally sleeping in dens over the winter.




    Here's Lesson 11:

    Урок номер одиннадцать – Lesson Number Eleven

    А: Извините, пожалуйста.
    Б: Да?
    А: Вы не знаете, как пройти к Эрмитажу?
    Б: Да, знаю. Это недалеко отсюда. Сначала идите прямо.
    А: По этой улице?
    Б: Да, а потом поверните на первой улице направо.*
    А: Хорошо. На первой направо.
    Б: А потом на первой улице налево.
    А: Сначала прямо, потом направо, а потом на первой налево. Спасибо.
    Б: Не за что.

    *gRomoZeka - But the answer "поверните на первой улице направо" seems a bit unnatural to me. Maybe people in St.-P. talk like that, but I'd say: "на первом перекрестке поверните направо".

    У нас недостаточно места. – We don’t have enough room.
    Перед рестораном не было места. – In front of the restaurant, there wasn’t room.
    За домом часто можно найти место (для парковки). – Behind the building, it’s often possible to find (a parking) space.
    Летом трудно найти (свободное) место на улице. – In the summertime, it’s difficult to find a space in the street.
    Где здесь можно припарковаться? – Where is it possible to park here?
    На улице не было места. – On the street, there were no spaces.
    Я не мог найти (свободного) места на улице. – I couldn’t find a space on the street.
    Как пройти к музею? – How do I get to the museum? [on foot]
    Как проехать к музею? – How do I get to the museum? [by machine]

  11. #71
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Северо-Восточный Администритивный Округ.
    Posts
    3,471
    Rep Power
    17
    Correct me if I'm wrong...

    А: Вы не знаете, как пройти к Эрмитажу?
    Б: Да, знаю. Это недалеко отсюда. Сначала идите прямо.
    Doesn't дойти до Эрмитажа sound better? Since Пройти means to pass.

    Also

    Как пройти к музею
    Как проехать к музею


    isn't дойти/доехать just more natural?

    Like "tourists Друг с другом говорят "Завтра мы были очень заняты, до Эрмитажа не могли дойти. А сегодня доидём!"

    Or am I missing something.


    На улице не было место
    Я не мог найти место на улице


    Could it be места?
    Вот это да, я так люблю себя. И сегодня я люблю себя, ещё больше чем вчера, а завтра я буду любить себя to ещё больше чем сегодня. Тем что происходит,я вполне доволен!

  12. #72
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,073
    Rep Power
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogboy182
    Как пройти к музею
    Как проехать к музею

    isn't дойти/доехать just more natural?
    "Пройти/проехать" is widely used in this context (asking for directions). It's perfectly natural.

    But the answer "поверните на первой улице направо" seems a bit unnatural to me. Maybe people in St.-P. talk like that, but I'd say: "на первом перекрестке поверните направо".

    Could it be места?
    Yes, in some phrases there should be "места":

    У нас недостаточно места. – We don’t have enough room.
    Перед рестораном не было места. – In front of the restaurant, there wasn’t room.
    За домом часто можно найти место (для парковки). – Behind the building, it’s often possible to find (a parking) space.
    Летом трудно найти (свободное) место на улице. – In the summertime, it’s difficult to find a space in the street.
    На улице не было места. – On the street, there were no spaces.
    Я не мог найти (свободного) места на улице. – I couldn’t find a space on the street.

    ("Место/места" often requires some elaboration, i.e. what is that space/place/room you're talking about).

  13. #73
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Б: Машина не на улице? the sentence is very strange in this context...
    Well, the whole conversation is a bit surreal. Hmm, the car is missing. Should we call the police? Nah, we'll just take the bus instead. If my car was stolen I'd be freaking out.
    I'd say then "(Моей) машины нет на улице?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    We have lots of shops in the U.S. which are seasonal, for example in towns on the ocean get lots of tourists in the Summer months and virtually none in the Winter. Similarly, there are towns with shops that cater to skiers which are only open in the Winter.
    Я не знаю, есть ли такое в России, но я об этом первый раз слышу. Я думаю, что магазины, которые у нас зимой продают зимний спортинвентарь, летом просто продают что-то другое.
    В любом случае, предложение лучше будет звучать так:
    Летом эти магазины открыты.
    Иначе получается, что летом открыты все магазины (а зимой закрыты ).
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  14. #74
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Thanks for the help, folks. Here's the next lesson:

    Урок номер двенадцать – Lesson Number Twelve

    А: Извините, вы не знаете, откуда я могу позвонить?
    Б: Телефон там.
    А: Спасибо. А вы знаете код Москвы?
    Б: Код Москвы ноль девяносто пять.
    А: Большое спасибо.
    Б: Не за что.

    Вы знаете код Москвы? – Do you know the (area) code for Moscow?
    Это совсем не трудно. – That’s absolutely not difficult.
    Код Москвы ноль девяносто пять. – The code for Moscow is zero ninety-five.
    Не за что. – Don’t mention it.
    Кто-нибудь звонил? – Did anyone call?
    Кто звонил? – Who called?
    Я не знаю. Он не оставил сообщение. – I don’t know. He didn’t leave a message.

  15. #75
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    А: Извините, вы не знаете, откуда я могу позвонить?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  16. #76
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    28
    Rep Power
    10

    Newcomer greets you

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Thanks for the help, folks. Here's the next lesson:

    Урок номер двенадцать – Lesson Number Twelve
    Hi everybody!
    I just found this forum and it looks great! Now this is funny! I also started learning russian with Pimsleur's some time ago, and I was at this exact same lesson on december 17th!

    Boy I wish I had found this forum from the beginning, it would have prevented me from making mistakes I’m now used to ! For instance I realise that I often hear « и » instead of « e » at the end of words (as Grogs also used to at the beginning, it seems). Oh well, better now than never… So good job, and keep it up !

    Happy new year to all!

    Lyl.
    Excuse my english, I’m French.

  17. #77
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: Newcomer greets you

    Quote Originally Posted by Lylandra
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Thanks for the help, folks. Here's the next lesson:

    Урок номер двенадцать – Lesson Number Twelve
    Hi everybody!
    I just found this forum and it looks great! Now this is funny! I also started learning russian with Pimsleur's some time ago, and I was at this exact same lesson on december 17th!

    Boy I wish I had found this forum from the beginning, it would have prevented me from making mistakes I’m now used to ! For instance I realise that I often hear « и » instead of « e » at the end of words (as Grogs also used to at the beginning, it seems). Oh well, better now than never… So good job, and keep it up !

    Happy new year to all!

    Lyl.
    Welcome to the forum, Lylandra! The people here are great at keeping you straight, especially Оля in my case. There are aspects to the Russian language that, to my ears, are very subtle, for example I thought I heard 'yee' (ей) on the CD's rather than 'yay'. I originally came looking for written versions of the Pimsleur lessons and I found that fortheether had already done most of them, although he was using the older version. Typing the lessons out myself has been a really amazing help to my Russian writing skills.

    I've been moving through the lessons pretty slowly lately because of the holidays (I mostly listen to the CD's in the car on my way to and from work), but I'll probably start posting them more regularly once life returns to normal. In the meantime, I have managed to find the time to finish one lesson, so I'll post it up.

    С новым годом!

    Grogs

    Вот тринадцатый урок:

    Урок номер тринадцать – Lesson Number Thirteen

    А: Кто-нибудь звонил?
    Б: Да, вам звонила Светлана Петрова из Москвы.
    А: Госпожа Петрова?
    Б: Да, десять минут назад.
    А: Она оставила мне сообщение?
    Б: Нет, не оставила.
    А: Мне ещё кто-нибудь звонил?
    Б: Нет, мистер Картер.

    Вам никто не звонил. – No one called you.
    Кто-то звонил. – Someone called.
    Вам кто-то звонил из Петербурга. – Someone called you from Petersburg.
    Вам звонил господин Жуков. – Mr. Zhukov called you.
    Он президент компании. – He’s the president of the company.
    Все будут там. – Everyone will be there.
    Я собираюсь ему позвонить. – I’m going to call him.
    Я собираюсь ему перезвонить. – I’m going to call him back.
    Как долго она будет длиться? – How long will it [the meeting] last?
    Как долго будет длиться встреча? – How long will the meeting last?
    Вам звонил президент два часа назад. – The president called you two hours ago.

  18. #78
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21

    Re: Newcomer greets you

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Вот тринадцатый урок:

    А: Госпожа Петрова?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  19. #79
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    241
    Rep Power
    11
    Вот следующий урок:

    Урок номер четырнадцать – Lesson Number Fourteen

    А: Извините, Анна Сергеевна.
    Б: Да, я вас слушаю.
    А: Во сколько начинается сегодняшняя встреча?
    Б: Вы не знаете? Она будет в два часа.
    А: Сегодня в два часа. Хорошо. И как долго она будет длиться?
    Б: Она будет длиться до пяти.
    А: Хорошо. Спасибо.
    Б: Не за что.

    Здравствуйте, Анна Сергеевна. – Hello, Anna Sergeyevna.
    полвторого – half past one
    полтретьего – half past two
    Встреча начинается в полвторого. – The meeting begins at half past one.
    Вы можете ему перезвонить в полтретьего. – You can call him back at half past two.
    Вам пора ему перезвонить. – It’s time for you to call him back.
    Сегодня у вас была встреча? – You had a meeting today?
    Это была не очень важная встреча. – This wasn’t a very important meeting.
    полчаса – half an hour
    Встреча будет длиться только полчаса. – The meeting will last only half an hour.
    Нам пора поговорить об этом. – It’s time for us to talk about that.
    Мне пора ехать. – It’s time for me to be going.
    Вам звонила ваша жена. – Your wife called you.
    Мне надо ей перезвонить? – Do I need to call her back?
    Я вернусь через полчаса. – I’m returning in half an hour.

  20. #80
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,874
    Rep Power
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Б: Вы не знаете, она будет в два часа.
    I don't understand this answer. Maybe: "Вы не знаете? Она будет в два часа".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pimsleur - Level 1
    By fortheether in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 209
    Last Post: December 4th, 2020, 07:49 AM
  2. Pimsleur - Level 2
    By fortheether in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 196
    Last Post: November 22nd, 2017, 07:35 PM
  3. phonetic transcriptions of Pimsleur level 1 lessons 1-10
    By SoftPretzel in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 24th, 2010, 05:28 PM
  4. Pimsleur Level 1 Text
    By haelen in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 26th, 2008, 08:18 AM
  5. level tests
    By Lt. Columbo in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 5th, 2006, 06:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary