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Thread: Russian slang and expressions

  1. #1
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    Russian slang and expressions

    The live in Russia has its own specific features that other countries don't have. These features affected on Russian language. Some Russian words and expressions are very popular but have they got a proper translation? Could you translate these expressions?

    Халява,халявщик (? freebie)
    Халтура,халтурщик
    Пофигист
    Жить с фигой в кармане

    May be others remind more.
    Я танцую пьяный на столе нума нума е нума нума нума е
    Снова счастье улыбнулось мне нума нума е нума нума нума е

  2. #2
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    Well.. the last expression is not popular in Russia

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    Халява,халявщик---for free/someone who gets stuff for free or without trying
    Халтура,халтурщик---bad job(as in craftsmanship)/someone who makes things that are not of good quality
    Пофигист---someone who doesn't give a damn
    *~Tatiana~*
    (Таня )

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    JJ
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    But "халтура" means also "from time to time job" or may be it is something like "moonlight job", am I right? Please correct me.
    Gib immer 100% bei der Arbeit: 12% am Montag, 23% am Dienstag, 40% am Mittwoch, 20% am Donnerstag, 5% am Freitag ...

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    I think the words you are searching for is "part time job".
    Вот это да, я так люблю себя. И сегодня я люблю себя, ещё больше чем вчера, а завтра я буду любить себя to ещё больше чем сегодня. Тем что происходит,я вполне доволен!

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    Moonlighting's not the same as part-time. When you moonlight, I'm not sure what word we give to the job .. 'second job'? that's no good either..
    Море удачи и дачу у моря

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    JJ
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    In russian "халтура" means something like not a primary job but something that happened from time to time like you make some money on the side, it's an additional job. Does it mean "moonlight"?
    Gib immer 100% bei der Arbeit: 12% am Montag, 23% am Dienstag, 40% am Mittwoch, 20% am Donnerstag, 5% am Freitag ...

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    I think what you meant by «from time to time job» is «шабашка». But I know «халтура» only in the sense of «awfully-made working».
    Anyway, the first post's questions are still active. NYgirl3 gave definitions, perhaps somebody can give English analogues.

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    JJ
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    In the Middle Ural words халтура and шабашка have the same meaning.
    Gib immer 100% bei der Arbeit: 12% am Montag, 23% am Dienstag, 40% am Mittwoch, 20% am Donnerstag, 5% am Freitag ...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ
    In the Middle Ural words халтура and шабашка have the same meaning.
    It is the same in Moscow. I think most Russians use it in this sense.
    There is even a verb "подхалтурить" (make some money "on the side").

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katerina
    Well.. the last expression is not popular in Russia
    Did you mean the expression "May be others remind more"?

    Actually, I know the meanings of that words but I don't know the English twins.

    I think this way. May be it helps to native English speakers.
    Халява - It is something free or easy to get. (I think = freebie, warez)
    Халявщик – It is somebody who made халява.
    Халтура - It is moonlight work or bad quality work.
    Халтурщик – It is somebody who made халтура.
    Пофигист – It is somebody who doesn't care.
    Фига в кармане - I think so. It is something like inaction protest. The man does something, he has to do, but keep "фига в кармане".
    Я танцую пьяный на столе нума нума е нума нума нума е
    Снова счастье улыбнулось мне нума нума е нума нума нума е

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    slang

    does халявщик have a negative connotation? If so, the American English equivalent would be "freeloader", someone who tries to get others to pay for things, or tries to get things for free).

    If it doesn't have a negative connotation, I don't think there's a single English word for it. We'd probably say the person "is always on the look-out for bargains" or something like that.

    in a literary context, doesn't халтура mean low quality stuff produced by a hack writer, like pot boilers or cheap romances?

    you're right JJ, moonlighting is the best English translation for халтура in the other sense.

  13. #13
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    I seem to remember from way back when asking about some book I was reading that the word "халявщик" was used during Soviet times to mean a guy who smuggled blue jeans, ABBA records, and that sort of thing, heh.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pravit
    I seem to remember from way back when asking about some book I was reading that the word "халявщик" was used during Soviet times to mean a guy who smuggled blue jeans, ABBA records, and that sort of thing, heh.
    Actually it was "фарцовщик".
    http://masterrussian.net/mforum/viewtopic.php?t=1056
    "Happy new year, happy new year
    May we all have a vision now and then
    Of a world where every neighbour is a friend"

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    Gah, whoops! Well, I knew it had "-schik" in there somewhere, heh.

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    It seems I found a twin-word for халтурщик = sloven. What do you thing?
    Я танцую пьяный на столе нума нума е нума нума нума е
    Снова счастье улыбнулось мне нума нума е нума нума нума е

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