Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36

Thread: I need help with plans for emigration to the Russian Federation.

  1. #1
    Подающий надежды оратор Robert Swain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Arlington, Texas
    Posts
    13
    Rep Power
    5

    I need help with plans for emigration to the Russian Federation.

    As you saw in the subject, I want to become a Russian citizen when I am older. I think I would like to be a teacher of English in a public school and then privately tutor students in the Russian language for an extra fee.

    I need a lot of help with figuring out my plans, any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    So far, my plan is to get a degree in the Russian language and in education while I'm in America. Then I'll stay in America long enough to pay off my student loans, being a teacher of the Russian language (or possibly history.)

    Once I am fluent in the Russian language, I want to move to Russia. Moscow specifically.

    I am pretty sure I understand citizenship laws. The rules are I have to 1) Speak Russian, 2) Have a work Visa, 3) Not commit any crime, 4) Become naturalized by living in the Russian Federation for at least 5 years.

    I am currently learning the Russian language. I don't know very much of it, but I am studying it every day and I hope to be fluent within the next decade.

    ANY tips or suggestions regarding emigration to the Russian Federation would be GREATLY appreciated.

    *Edit*

    It has come to my attention that I've posted this in the wrong section. I apologize. Any advice would still be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    115
    Rep Power
    5
    Hi Robert,
    Actually it's strange that you have such attitude to Russia with that propaganda against it out there...
    Why you want to move here? Russia is not so a bad place but actually in the USA conditions are better.
    As I see that you want to get degree in the Russian language I think it would not be useful here as far as unlikely you would teach Russian here. In point of view of work I think it'd better to get degree in the English language. Russian-speaking teachers of English with not good knowing of it get fee quite a lot.

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    США
    Posts
    2,284
    Rep Power
    12
    Maybe you should go live and work there for awhile to see if you really want to become a citizen. You have to consider what career or life you would lead there. Your options in America are so much greater, unless of course you want to teach ESL to Russians as a career. "Real jobs" will most likely be beyond your reach because of language and cultural barriers. Then consider earnings and lifestyle, quality of life.
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  4. #4
    Почтенный гражданин delog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    pale blue dot
    Posts
    270
    Rep Power
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Swain
    As you saw in the subject, I want to become a Russian citizen when I am older. I think I would like to be a teacher of English in a public school and then privately tutor students in the Russian language for an extra fee.
    You want emigrate to Russia and become a teacher... This is the most crazy idea I've ever heard. Do you have any idea what is a teacher in Russia? It is like heaven and hell if you want to compare educational work in US and RF. Be ready to work 12 hour per day (often in saturday and sunday too) and earn about $1 per your real working hour, not per declared hours.
    English as a Second Language by Jeff McQuillan and Lucy Tse.

  5. #5
    Подающий надежды оратор Robert Swain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Arlington, Texas
    Posts
    13
    Rep Power
    5
    To everyone:

    I know that it sounds like a crazy idea, but I'm honestly not too concerned about making a lot of money. I've loved everything Russian since I was a small child and it is my dream to live there. I know that the conditions may be bad, but I think living my dream would be worth the poor conditions.

    I've spoken with one of my friends who lives in Moscow, and he says that public school students would not be that interested in learning English anyway. With that knowledge, I think that teaching in a private school might be a better idea. What do you guys think?
    Learning Russian through independent study and school classes. Currently in a Russian 2 class.

    Славься отечество,
    Наше свободное!

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    15
    >tips or suggestions regarding emigration
    My suggestion -- forget about it. Russia these days is no place to live. Especially if you have had the luxury of living in the US. Have you even been there on a visit? Probably an extremely high percentage of things you take for granted here are not available there. For instance, in Moscow the hot water system is city-wide, not heated in each individual building as it is here. And they turn it OFF for a couple of weeks EVERY summer. It is advisable not to drink the water unless purified. Another thing is the unacceptable level of corruption in government as compared to here. Short life spans.

    Sign up for a two-week course in Moscow and see what you think. I spent a month there in 2003 at a school in Moscow. Just checked it and it is still there at Learn Russian language in Moscow, Russia - Home . I am even in one of the photos on the main page!

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    20
    I agree with those, who say that you should go for a visit first. Maybe as an English language tutor (there are always vacancies in various language schools). To make your experience more extreme and authentic move in in winter. You'll get a feel for people, way of life, living conditions. Then you'll be able to make an informed decision.
    Quote Originally Posted by chaika View Post
    >tips or suggestions regarding emigration
    For instance, in Moscow the hot water system is city-wide, not heated in each individual building as it is here. [...]Short life spans.
    Water is not a problem, you always can buy a boiler and have your own supply of hot water. BTW, the good side of centralised water system is that hot water does not run cold, however long you use it. If anything it gets hotter in the process.
    And I hope that short life spans are not contagious.

  8. #8
    Почтенный гражданин delog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    pale blue dot
    Posts
    270
    Rep Power
    6

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    To make your experience more extreme and authentic move in in winter.
    Ахаха, у меня за окном сейчас -42°С, представляю себе, как тут техасец в кроссовках будет наяривать
    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    Probably an extremely high percentage of things you take for granted here are not available there. For instance, in Moscow the hot water system is city-wide, not heated in each individual building as it is here.
    Well, it's difficult to call problem. Leaking roofs are better fit for example. Or incompetent people almost in all segments, starting from plumbing specialist (хе-хе, у вас они специалистами называются) and ending with doctors. Or buses packed with people. Or roads turned the rivers after each rain. Or street gangs that suggest to part with yours mobile. And so forth.
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Swain
    I've spoken with one of my friends who lives in Moscow, and he says that public school students would not be that interested in learning English anyway. With that knowledge, I think that teaching in a private school might be a better idea. What do you guys think?
    I think you should go to Moscow... which is located in your state Texas. Hehe... Now seriously. Firstly, if you really have an obsession to live here, you'd better live in Moscow, because Moscow and Russia are different things. Secondly, never try to get a teacher's position. If you want to teach English, then be a tutor, you definitely will be command popularity, if you'll position yourself as a native English speaker.
    English as a Second Language by Jeff McQuillan and Lucy Tse.

  9. #9
    Подающий надежды оратор Robert Swain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Arlington, Texas
    Posts
    13
    Rep Power
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by chaika View Post
    >tips or suggestions regarding emigration
    My suggestion -- forget about it. Russia these days is no place to live. Especially if you have had the luxury of living in the US. Have you even been there on a visit? Probably an extremely high percentage of things you take for granted here are not available there. For instance, in Moscow the hot water system is city-wide, not heated in each individual building as it is here. And they turn it OFF for a couple of weeks EVERY summer. It is advisable not to drink the water unless purified. Another thing is the unacceptable level of corruption in government as compared to here. Short life spans.

    Sign up for a two-week course in Moscow and see what you think. I spent a month there in 2003 at a school in Moscow. Just checked it and it is still there at Learn Russian language in Moscow, Russia - Home . I am even in one of the photos on the main page!
    I can accept not having luxuries. That isn't a problem at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by delog View Post
    Ахаха, у меня за окном сейчас -42°С, представляю себе, как тут техасец в кроссовках будет наяривать
    I am used to cold weather, I like it when it gets cold in Texas. I would be able to adjust to Russian climate very easily.
    Learning Russian through independent study and school classes. Currently in a Russian 2 class.

    Славься отечество,
    Наше свободное!

  10. #10
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    401
    Rep Power
    6
    I think every male citizen in russia has to serve one or two year in the army, unless he has some good reasons not to. Is that right? And does it concern immigrants too?
    Anyway I don't understand why everyone try to convince this guy to forget about this idea. A lot of people do live in Russia and they weren't that unhappy last time I checked.

  11. #11
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Zubr View Post
    Anyway I don't understand why everyone try to convince this guy to forget about this idea.
    I don't! I think he should try it if it is his dream, or he'll regert about not trying for the rest of his life.
    We just want him to be prepared.

  12. #12
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,157
    Rep Power
    10
    It's like my friend's saying about his wedding, "I don't actually quite feel like becoming a family man, I just wanna try it and see what it looks like, so that in a couple of years I'll be able to say 'I have this experience!' "

  13. #13
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Москва, однако
    Posts
    1,957
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Zubr View Post
    I think every male citizen in russia has to serve one or two year in the army, unless he has some good reasons not to. Is that right? And does it concern immigrants too?
    Not if he is already 28 y.o. OR has served in the military of another country. Some Russians Jews apply for Israeli citizenship, do a short tour of duty in the Israeli army, and then go back to Russia knowing they will never be drafted. Some young Russians in the Pechora district of the Pskov Region serve in the Estonian army for the same purpose.

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Swain View Post
    I am used to cold weather, I like it when it gets cold in Texas. I would be able to adjust to Russian climate very easily.
    I don't want to discourage you, but Russian cold weather is not the same as Texan cold weather... Have you ever tried spending a winter in Alaska or northern Canada? That may give you some idea of what the Russian winter is like.

  14. #14
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by translationsnmru View Post
    Not if he is already 28 y.o. OR has served in the military of another country.
    Considering that Robert Swain needs some time to learn Russian, and then he has to wait another 5 years to apply for citizenship, I'd say he's pretty safe even if he's around 20 now. )

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    США
    Posts
    2,284
    Rep Power
    12
    he seem pretty gung-ho, maybe he'd relish serving in the Russian military to deepen his experience of his new родина.
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  16. #16
    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Other Universe
    Posts
    8,506
    Rep Power
    25
    Before you set your head to stone about moving to Moscow (and generally -- to Russia) I suggest you to came here for a visit. Stay a couple of weeks (but not in the hotel, but rent an apartment instead) - just to 'feel' it. It's not that bad as they try to tell you. Of course, Moscow is an expensive city to live in (probably will cost you more than your present living in Texas). Buying a tiny apartment at a shabby Moscow suburb will cost you no less than $100,000 - $120,000, if you plan to live near the center it could go as high as several million.
    This is the primary difficulty -- finding a place to live in. You can rent some, I suppose (monthly cost is around $1,200). Being an expensive city, Moscow is also a very convenient place if you don't count ecology (5 million cars make the air a little bit poor with oxygen sometimes). You can find any service, any merchandise even at 4 a.m. if you really want to. Despite anything, living in Moscow does not differ all that much from living in any other large city in the world, I think that you'll face all the same difficulties and the same problems. In some respects Moscow can even be a better choice.
    So, if you don't plan to open an own business here (which I strongly advise against without first understanding Russian realities here) you can come here without any fear.
    There's one thing I should probably warn you about - don't ever expect any official to do what's he expected to do. Don't be surprised if they don't.
    Send me a PM if you need me.

  17. #17
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,157
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil View Post
    There's one thing I should probably warn you about - don't ever expect any official to do what he's expected to do. Don't be surprised if they don't.
    LOL
    True.

  18. #18
    Hanna
    Guest
    Robert I saw in the other thread that you are 15. If you still want to do this after you have finished college and visited Russia, then go ahead - and people will take you seriously. In the meantime, study Russian.

    @Ramil: @ USD 1200 /month for a small, bad flat you say? And USD 200k to buy a small flat in the suburb...


    That does NOT add up with my understanding of average incomes in Russia... Unless regular people spend most of their income on their rent? Either I am misunderstanding what incomes people have, or the housing situation is absolutely hellish.

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Other Universe
    Posts
    8,506
    Rep Power
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Hanna View Post
    Robert I saw in the other thread that you are 15. If you still want to do this after you have finished college and visited Russia, then go ahead - and people will take you seriously. In the meantime, study Russian.

    @Ramil: @ USD 1200 /month for a small, bad flat you say? And USD 200k to buy a small flat in the suburb...


    That does NOT add up with my understanding of average incomes in Russia... Unless regular people spend most of their income on their rent? Either I am misunderstanding what incomes people have, or the housing situation is absolutely hellish.
    I was talking about Moscow. Once you're past the Moscow Automobile Ring Road those prices go lower and lower.
    But in Moscow, apartments ARE expensive. If you don't happen to own one (back from the Soviet era) you're going to spend quite a lot of money for your living place there. No wonder, that buying an apartment (even with a loan) is nearly impossible task for many. An average 2 room flat within the third transportation ring will cost you about 7 to 9 million Roubles ($250k-300k).
    If you want the same flat within the Garden Ring the price would start at 20-25 million ($650k-850k) and can go even higher than that.
    Send me a PM if you need me.

  20. #20
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    115
    Rep Power
    5
    That residential conditions also cause the corruption.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: April 12th, 2006, 02:52 PM
  2. Lesson's plans that have worked for you?
    By vino in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: June 28th, 2004, 05:31 AM
  3. Making plans
    By Knave in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 21st, 2004, 04:33 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary