Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 87

Thread: Foreigners making patronymics

  1. #41
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    12
    Why o why do Brits and Yanks always end up scrapping on message boards?

    PS the ay in stead of ah makes my brain melt too, but shh

  2. #42
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    140
    Rep Power
    13
    Is it even fair to compare Americans vs British, since Americans don't all talk the same? You can hear something in New England, then go down south and it sounds completely different, and then go out west and it sounds like neither of the first two. Example: Do you call it pop, coke, or soda? Do you say Hey, Hi, Howdy, or Hello? The first year I lived in North Carolina I couldn't understand half of what my English teacher said cause she had such a strong AMERICAN southern accent. Go figure. So, all of this bickering should really be broken down much further.
    Yay! I broke 200 posts!

  3. #43
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Амстелвэйн, Нидерланды
    Posts
    658
    Rep Power
    12
    As if the whole of England speaks the same... I believe I read somewhere that England has one of the biggest varieties in accents per head.
    Army Anti-Strapjes
    Nay, mats jar tripes
    Jasper is my Tartan
    I am a trans-Jert spy
    Jerpty Samaritans
    Pijams are tyrants
    Jana Sperm Tit Arsy

  4. #44
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    12
    One of my daughters is named Johanna, but we pronounce it with an english J instead of a german J. Not too uncommon these days.

  5. #45
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Англия
    Posts
    178
    Rep Power
    13
    there aren't really many different British accents. All of the south-east speaks londonish english (like me) the south-west is similar. All of norht england is fairly uniform, slightly different vowels, but nothing much. The only difficulties are strong irish or scottish accents (like Glaswegian! Totally incomprehensible!)

    PS Joanne and Joanna are both common names here too
    Эдмунд Ричардович Вудфилд

  6. #46
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Амстелвэйн, Нидерланды
    Posts
    658
    Rep Power
    12
    To say the whole south-west of England speaks the same is to say that all the southern States of America speak the same. Maybe to a londoner there's no difference between a dorset, devonshire and cornish accent, but there is. And Liverpudlian couldn't be more different from Brummie...
    Army Anti-Strapjes
    Nay, mats jar tripes
    Jasper is my Tartan
    I am a trans-Jert spy
    Jerpty Samaritans
    Pijams are tyrants
    Jana Sperm Tit Arsy

  7. #47
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    15
    Interesting to know, are there dialects within England? Methinks there aren't.

  8. #48
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Чикаго
    Posts
    14
    Rep Power
    12
    I've lived in england and there are a huge amount of dialects

  9. #49
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    15
    Dialects as in "Hey, he's from a different region, he's really hard to understand, uses words I've never heard of, and speaks incorrectly"?

  10. #50
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Чикаго
    Posts
    14
    Rep Power
    12
    yes

  11. #51
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Амстелвэйн, Нидерланды
    Posts
    658
    Rep Power
    12
    Then it's no dialect...
    Army Anti-Strapjes
    Nay, mats jar tripes
    Jasper is my Tartan
    I am a trans-Jert spy
    Jerpty Samaritans
    Pijams are tyrants
    Jana Sperm Tit Arsy

  12. #52
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Чикаго
    Posts
    14
    Rep Power
    12
    There are many dialects in the UK

    Scots Gaelic
    Manx Gaelic
    Cornish
    Welsh

  13. #53
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    aequidistant
    Posts
    676
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by змма
    There are many dialects in the UK

    Scots Gaelic
    Manx Gaelic
    Cornish
    Welsh
    These are not dialects. These are languages that have nothing to do with English.
    Jonesboro, Arkansas. Mean, stupid, violent fat people, no jobs, nothing to do, hotter than a dog with 2 d--cks.

  14. #54
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Invalid City!
    Posts
    1,352
    Rep Power
    14
    Scots (not Gaelic, or English spoken with a Scottish accent) is certainly a dialect. Up intil the 17th century it was officially considered a separate language, until English cultural imperialism began to stamp it out.

    Usage varies today along a spectrum from Scottish-accented English, which all English speakers can understand without difficulty, to a Scots/English mix whereby many old Scots words are used in favour of English words but the basic language remains English, which other English speakers are able to understand to an extent, though with difficulty (the majority of Scottish people speak this hybrid), to the extreme end of the scale which is pure Scots, and is entirely unintelligible to anyone who doesn't speak it (including most Scottish people).

    Moves are afoot in the Scottish Parliament to protect Scots in the same way that other minority languages (such as Gaelic) are protected in law, but this has so far proved fruitless due to the presistent prejudice that assumes that Scots is just English spoken by the ignorant (exactly the reason it was stamped out in the first place). Kind of ironic considering Scots' Law is almost entirely written and practiced in Scots.

  15. #55
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    China
    Posts
    860
    Rep Power
    12
    Of course Gaelic is not a dialect, but a different language, and the same for Welsh but..

    What is Geordie, if not a dialect?
    There are many dialects in the UK... aren't there?
    Море удачи и дачу у моря

  16. #56
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Англия
    Posts
    178
    Rep Power
    13
    most of these so called dialects are just accents. I don't believe I said that Liverpool and Brummie sound the same - if I did I take it back, I meant only to say that they are easily intelligible.

    P.S. I am not from London, I am from Kent, but the accent is still virtually the same. It is a "home-counties" accent found in Kent, Surrey, Sussex, London etc. It is known to other parts of the country as "posh southerner speak"
    Эдмунд Ричардович Вудфилд

  17. #57
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    18
    Rep Power
    12
    Can we get back on track with the whole purpose of this thread please? Ok first of all, my name is Maricruz Serrato, how would it be in cyrillic? Also, I have a little problem...or question I should say...my biological father's last name was Perez but my stepfather adopted me and therefore I now have his last name. If I were to give myself a patronymic, which would be appropriate to use? Efrain (bio-father's name) or Felipe (stepdad)? Help! Oh and I am going to be a professor in Russia...
    @---;---- Love is like playing the Piano. First you must learn to play by the rules, then you must forget the rules and play from your heart.

  18. #58
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Antwerp Zoo
    Posts
    212
    Rep Power
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by amazon princess
    Can we get back on track with the whole purpose of this thread please? Ok first of all, my name is Maricruz Serrato, how would it be in cyrillic? Also, I have a little problem...or question I should say...my biological father's last name was Perez but my stepfather adopted me and therefore I now have his last name. If I were to give myself a patronymic, which would be appropriate to use? Efrain (bio-father's name) or Felipe (stepdad)? Help! Oh and I am going to be a professor in Russia...
    what subject? In the near or distant future?

  19. #59
    Подающий надежды оратор PsiLord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Лондрина, ПР, Бразилия
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    12

    Let me try...

    Quote Originally Posted by amazon princess
    my name is Maricruz Serrato, how would it be in cyrillic?
    Hmmm, guessing a 'standard' Spanish pronunciation, maybe Марикруз Серрато would do. But I might be mistaken — I've seen the names of Brazilian actors and actresses spelt in Russian in ways that I wouldn't have guessed if I were to base myself on the original Portuguese pronunciation... I've even had Марсель suggested for my own name in the past, but Марсел sounds much closer to the way I pronounce it myself, so that's what I go around with.
    "שמע ישראל יהוה אלהינו יהוה אחד"

  20. #60
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    13
    I think, it is Марикрус, because z in Spanish sounds like [s].
    Perhaps Brasilian name should be Марсел indeed, because they have very distinct hard consonant "л" there. But many Russians don't know this and try to use more soft consonant "ль" like in Spanish or French. Besides Марсель is an official name of the very well-known city in France.
    The translators from Portuguese should know this anyhow.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Russian teacher for foreigners in Moscow
    By oksade in forum Tutors Directory
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 7th, 2009, 04:45 AM
  2. Slang phrases from foreigners' lips
    By blacky in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 15th, 2008, 03:12 PM
  3. A questions for foreigners
    By Acmepoug in forum Culture and History
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 1st, 2007, 06:08 AM
  4. Oh ye foreigners who have been in the Ukraine
    By kalinka_vinnie in forum Travel and Tourism
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: August 10th, 2006, 10:10 AM
  5. Russian lessons for Foreigners in Moscow
    By in forum Tutors Directory
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 29th, 2005, 08:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary