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Thread: привет!

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    привет!

    привет! My name is Kristina. :]
    I'm going to be 16 soon.
    I want to learn more Russian and live in Russia for few years every once in a while.
    I was born in Russia but I moved to America when I was 4. I forgot how to talk in Russian due to lack of use. I could ask my mom to teach me Russian again but she's always busy. So I am hoping you guys can help me. :] I am going to spend 2 months in Russian this summer as I have a place there. My goal is to not to use my mom as an interpreter this summer, haha.

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    Re: привет!

    Привет, Кристина. Добро пожаловать на форум.
    If you have problems with both posting new messages and sending PMs, you can send an e-mail to the Forum Administrator here:
    http://masterrussian.net/sendmessage.php
    У меня что-то с почтой, на ЛС ответить не могу. (

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    Re: пуивет!

    Спасибо. :] Я счастлив. I am learning something already!

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    Re: пуивет!

    Quote Originally Posted by icyblux
    Спасибо. :] Я счастлив.
    If you are Kristina, then you are "счастлива".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Re: пуивет!

    Oh, because I am female, right?

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    Re: пуивет!

    Quote Originally Posted by icyblux
    Oh, because I am female, right?
    Yep.
    And correct please the thread title. It's привет, not пуивет.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Re: привет!

    Ah, yeah, sorry.
    Thanks for your help.

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    Re: пуивет!

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by icyblux
    Oh, because I am female, right?
    Yep.
    And correct please the thread title. It's привет, not пуивет.
    А может она картавит?



    "Би веуи куает, айм хантинг уэббэц!"

    Seriously, I'm only making this joke because I want to ask: is the verb картавить said only о том, кто неправильно произносит звуки р и л? (I'm not making fun of icyblux, I mean -- I know it was just a typo!)

    Or can one say "Русские, когда говорят по-английски, типично картавят на звуках ð и θ"?

    (и то и другое пишется через th, но θ = with, а ð = this)
    Говорит Бегемот: "Dear citizens of MR -- please correct my Russian mistakes!"

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    Re: пуивет!

    А может, она картавит
    Quote Originally Posted by Throbert McGee
    Or can one say "Русские, когда говорят по-английски, типично картавят на звуках ð и θ"?
    No. Картавит only someone who has difficulties with (Russian!) "р" (not "л"!).
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Re: привет!

    Or can one say
    No. )
    Usually it's said even only about rolling [р]. I don't remember this word used referring the wrong pronunciation of [л], except logopaedic sites, another reason may be that [л] is much easier to pronounce and very few people can't do it.
    If you have problems with both posting new messages and sending PMs, you can send an e-mail to the Forum Administrator here:
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    У меня что-то с почтой, на ЛС ответить не могу. (

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    Re: пуивет!

    Quote Originally Posted by Throbert McGee
    А может она картавит?
    Speaking of which, what is that secret message enciphered in your signature? Baby talk?
    Mairzy doats and dozey doats and liddle amzee divey -- a kiddly divey too, wooden chew?

    liddle – little
    wooden chew? – wouldn’t you?

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    Re: привет!

    I am just starting to learn haha. Yeah, I knew it was привет. I just forgot. With practice, I'll get better eventually.

  13. #13
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    Re: привет!

    Welcome Kristina! Where are you going to this summer then?
    I have only visited St Petersburg but I would really like to see other parts of the country.

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    Re: пуивет!

    Quote Originally Posted by alexB
    Quote Originally Posted by Throbert McGee
    А может она картавит?
    Speaking of which, what is that secret message enciphered in your signature? Baby talk?
    Mairzy doats and dozey doats and liddle amzee divey -- a kiddly divey too, wooden chew?
    I'm glad that someone finally asked! It's not baby talk, but simply phonetically written. (Most Americans pronounce the word "little" as "liddle" in ordinary speech.)

    It means:

    Mares eat oats
    And does eat oats (NB: Here, "does" rhymes with "nose," not "buzz," since it means оленухи, not делает!)
    And little lambs eat ivy.
    A kid'll eat ivy, too --
    Wouldn't you?
    This was a popular American song in the 1940s, based on a much older pseudo-Latin nursery rhyme:

    In fir tar is
    In oak none is
    In mud eel is
    In clay none is
    Mares eat ivy
    Does eat oats.

    (When pronounced aloud, this is supposed to sound like Latin: Infer taris, in hoc nunis, etc.)

    I'm not sure if it's true, but I've read that during World War II, American soldiers would use the lyrics from "Mairzy Doats" as a password (пароль, in Russian).
    Говорит Бегемот: "Dear citizens of MR -- please correct my Russian mistakes!"

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    Re: привет!

    Quote Originally Posted by Johanna
    Welcome Kristina! Where are you going to this summer then?
    I have only visited St Petersburg but I would really like to see other parts of the country.
    I lived in москва so I will go there. I am going to visit St. Petersburg for a couple days for the first time, though! :] I'll also visit areas right by Black Sea too.

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    Re: пуивет!

    [quote=Throbert McGee]
    Quote Originally Posted by alexB
    Quote Originally Posted by "Throbert McGee":j3xeuem3
    А может она картавит?
    Speaking of which, what is that secret message enciphered in your signature? Baby talk?
    Mairzy doats and dozey doats and liddle amzee divey -- a kiddly divey too, wooden chew?
    I'm glad that someone finally asked! It's not baby talk, but simply phonetically written. (Most Americans pronounce the word "little" as "liddle" in ordinary speech.)

    It means:

    Mares eat oats
    And does eat oats (NB: Here, "does" rhymes with "nose," not "buzz," since it means оленухи, not делает!)
    And little lambs eat ivy.
    A kid'll eat ivy, too --
    Wouldn't you?
    This was a popular American song in the 1940s, based on a much older pseudo-Latin nursery rhyme:

    In fir tar is
    In oak none is
    In mud eel is
    In clay none is
    Mares eat ivy
    Does eat oats.

    (When pronounced aloud, this is supposed to sound like Latin: Infer taris, in hoc nunis, etc.)

    I'm not sure if it's true, but I've read that during World War II, American soldiers would use the lyrics from "Mairzy Doats" as a password (пароль, in Russian).[/quote:j3xeuem3]
    Super! But do other Americans or Englishmen know the song?
    And another thing, about your оленухи. At first the word struck me as very funny. I’ve never heard it before and if I had I’d certainly have thought it had been used in a mocking way. It sounds nothing but funny to me as, I think, to many other Russians. Just in case, I goggled it and you know what? It so happens that, however ridiculous it might seem, оленуха is the word legally present in several dictionaries of Russian language and not олениха. For me a female deer (doe it is, in your funny song) will remain олениха for good, but now, having that incriminating evidence on my hands, I’m not sure about the others anymore.

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    Re: пуивет!

    Quote Originally Posted by alexB
    Quote Originally Posted by Throbert McGee
    I'm not sure if it's true, but I've read that during World War II, American soldiers would use the lyrics from "Mairzy Doats" as a password (пароль, in Russian).
    Super! But do other Americans or Englishmen know the song?
    I think that many Americans with a good education (or who watch a lot of movies set in the WWII/BOB years) know the song, because it has stood the test of time and survived to become one of the popular hits associated with that era. But I don't think that it has migrated into the "American folk consciousness," becoming one of those songs that absolutely everybody knows.

    And another thing, about your оленухи. ... For me a female deer (doe it is, in your funny song) will remain олениха for good,
    Well, I have to admit that I looked up the word just for this post, in my 1977 Ozhegov, because I only knew the masculine form олень. Looking in the dictionary again, I also find оленина (venison) and оленёнок (fawn), but not олениха. (Wow, this is one time when the Russian words for an animal and its meat are much simpler to remember than in English: for the general concept of "deer," we also have the specific terms "stag" and "buck" (both meaning a male), in addition to "doe," "fawn," and "venison.")

    P.S. Вот мое издание Ожеговина Словаря Русского Языка, рядом с моими бывшими* крысами "Rugby" и "Soccer" -- можете ли вы отгадать, кто из них -- кем?



    * I'm sure that is the wrong word here -- what's a better word to describe a pet that has died? Дохлый? Покойный?
    Говорит Бегемот: "Dear citizens of MR -- please correct my Russian mistakes!"

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    Re: привет!

    Quote Originally Posted by Throbert McGee
    P.S. Вот мое издание Словаря Русского Языка Ожегова, рядом с моими бывшими* крысами "Rugby" и "Soccer" -- можете ли вы отгадать, кто из них -- кто?



    * I'm sure that is the wrong word here -- what's a better word to describe a pet that has died? Дохлый? Покойный?
    Let’s make it ты, not вы.
    Усопшими would be grave and funny at the same time.
    "Rugby" is big and white and the other one, let me see, aha, "Soccer",
    я так думаю

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    Re: привет!

    Quote Originally Posted by alexB
    Let’s make it ты, not вы.
    Alex, ну он же не только к тебе обращается.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Re: привет!

    Пардон. Никогда себе этого не прощу!

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