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Thread: How do you say...

  1. #1
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    How do you say...

    How do you say "Do they have........" I'm listening to Pimsleur, 2nd level, lesson #7, and it sounds to me that "Do they have" is pronounced "у них естъ..... my brain is telling me it should be " у их естъ ". which is correct??? thank you.........
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    них есть" is correct.

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    After a preposition их, его, её, (PRONOUNS, not the possesives) add an initial Н.

    Я его знаю
    У него есть...

    Note these are not the possesives его (his), её (her), их (their), but the genitives of он она их.
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    The reason for н is just the same as in English article "an" (an apple):
    to separate two vowels.

    Read it aloud:
    у их
    у них

    take your pick.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    The reason for н is just the same as in English article "an" (an apple):
    to separate two vowels.

    Read it aloud:
    у их
    у них

    take your pick.
    Nahhhhhhh...

    "Their friend has a...." - "у их друга есть..."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    The reason for н is just the same as in English article "an" (an apple):
    to separate two vowels.

    Read it aloud:
    у их
    у них

    take your pick.
    Sort of true.

    But you still say У его сына есть (His song has...)

    Because here его is the possesive (his), and not the pronoun (him).
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    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    The reason for н is just the same as in English article "an" (an apple):
    to separate two vowels.

    Read it aloud:
    у их
    у них

    take your pick.
    Sort of true.

    But you still say У его сына есть (His song has...)

    Because here его is the possesive (his), and not the pronoun (him).
    Perhaps one can also say 'u syna evo est.. /something/'?

    I know I heard this somewhere. I wouldn't use it because it's grammatically inconsistent, but hey.. <.<
    "С чий очи сънувам, чий е този лик обречен?
    Смъртен глас ми се причува и отеква с вик далечен
    Как да зърна да погледна, чуждий образ да прегърна,
    на лицето ми студено грях в надежда да превърна.."

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    I did not say that the rule is universal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    I did not say that the rule is universal.
    Firstly it's not hard to say у его

    because Е is technically not a vowel, since it is made up of TWO sounds:

    Й + Э

    And Й is a consonant.

    Like in English

    You say "A yellow bus", not "An yellow bus". Y (Й) is a consonant.

    I expect it has something to do with pronunciation, but I thing there is more to it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    I did not say that the rule is universal.
    Firstly it's not hard to say у его

    I can say a apple too, but that would be wrong.

    because Е is technically not a vowel, since it is made up of TWO sounds:

    Й + Э


    н helps to mark the beginning of a new word.

    у его will sooner be heard as уего

    And Й is a consonant.

    Like in English

    You say "A yellow bus", not "An yellow bus". Y (Й) is a consonant.



    I expect it has something to do with pronunciation,


    exactly (the same as with the yellow bus).

    I can distinguish whether I should use a or an but I don't know the rule. My approach is simple - if it sounds better with an - so be it.


    but I thing there is more to it.


    Maybe you're right.
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    In Russian there is a rule though.

    There are grey areas in English regarding A/an

    E.g. it's usage with H (and I'm not talking about silent H).

    An historic event
    A history lesson

    Above is the correct usage. The reason why the first take an is that the stress falls on the second syllable. Whereas with History it falls on the first syllable.

    In Russian with the addition of н- there is a simple rule when to use it.
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    Here's some info on that "an historic" thing. It's a quote from here.

    A or An?

    Question: I have a question regarding the proper use of the indefinite articles "a" and "an." Specifically, I would like to know the rule concerning which indefinite article to use with words beginning with the letters "h" and "u."

    For example, I often see the phrases "an unique experience" and "an historic moment." To my ear, this usage of "an" sounds awkward, and "a" sounds more natural.

    What is the exact rule regarding these examples? Thank you in advance.

    Answer: The pronunciation of a word determines whether "a" or "an" precedes it. "H" is a problematic letter. Sometimes "h" is sounded, as in "history." Sometimes "h" is silent, as in "hour."

    A sounded "h" is treated as a consonant: a history book. A silent "h" is treated as a vowel: an hour. Sometimes "h" is sounded, but weakly — as in "historical." In speech, "an historical event" is fine; in writing, "a historical event" is correct.

    The long "u" (pronounced "yu") takes the article "a": a universal condition. Similarly: "a European film," "a youth," "a euphoric experience."
    Please correct my mistakes if you can, especially article usage.
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    Nahhhhhhh...

    "Their friend has a...." - "у их друга есть..."
    у ихнего друга есть


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    Quote Originally Posted by Alware
    у ихнего друга есть

    Это не грамотно. Но так многие говорят
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Это не грамотно.
    Are you sure about that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alware
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Это не грамотно.
    Are you sure about that?
    Absolutly.

    Ну если точнее, это просторечный вариант. Возможно, когда-нибудь он станет нормой.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vadim84
    Here's some info on that "an historic" thing. It's a quote from here.

    A or An?

    Question: I have a question regarding the proper use of the indefinite articles "a" and "an." Specifically, I would like to know the rule concerning which indefinite article to use with words beginning with the letters "h" and "u."

    For example, I often see the phrases "an unique experience" and "an historic moment." To my ear, this usage of "an" sounds awkward, and "a" sounds more natural.

    What is the exact rule regarding these examples? Thank you in advance.

    Answer: The pronunciation of a word determines whether "a" or "an" precedes it. "H" is a problematic letter. Sometimes "h" is sounded, as in "history." Sometimes "h" is silent, as in "hour."

    A sounded "h" is treated as a consonant: a history book. A silent "h" is treated as a vowel: an hour. Sometimes "h" is sounded, but weakly — as in "historical." In speech, "an historical event" is fine; in writing, "a historical event" is correct.

    The long "u" (pronounced "yu") takes the article "a": a universal condition. Similarly: "a European film," "a youth," "a euphoric experience."
    Well the use with "U" is obvious, because in English, U often is pronounced "Yoo", which starts with a consonant sound.

    "In speech, "an historical event" is fine". That makes it sound like it is wrong but acceptable. On the BBC news they ALWAYS say "An historical".
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    The English [h] is so weak that it tends to fall out in certain words, as in initial position ('history') or in the middle ('prohibition'). Maybe it will fall in disuse as in Spanish.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    The English [h] is so weak that it tends to fall out in certain words, as in initial position ('history') or in the middle ('prohibition'). Maybe it will fall in disuse as in Spanish.
    That's not really it.

    You never say "An history lesson", because the stress falls on the first sylable, therefore, the H is quite prominent.

    Historical is different, because the stress falls on the second sylable, so the H is much weaker.

    "An history" sounds strange.
    "An historic" sounds natural.

    It also depends on the vowel sound following the H.

    Well in the London cockney accent, Hs are dropped.

    'Ave you got an 'at?

    Annoyingly, people who drop their Hs, tend to call the letter "Hache", when as anyone educated knows, the name of H is "Ache".
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  20. #20
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    The name of 'H' came from the French 'hache'.
    English name must be written 'aitch'.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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