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Thread: Words for depart and arrive by train

  1. #1
    Увлечённый спикер
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    Words for depart and arrive by train

    влететь ... улететь на самолёте.

    на поезде?

    спасибо

  2. #2
    Почтенный гражданин Soft sign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by justinwyllie View Post
    влететь ... улететь на самолёте.
    Влететь is incorrect.

    ‘depart’ — perf улете́ть, imperf улета́ть
     or perf вы́лететь, imperf вылета́ть
    ‘arrive’ — perf прилете́ть, imperf прилета́ть

    улете́ть and вы́лететь are not always interchangeable. I can’t think of an explanation of the difference though…

    Quote Originally Posted by justinwyllie View Post
    на поезде?
    Colloquial words:
    ‘depart’ — perf уе́хать, imperf уезжа́ть
     or perf вы́ехать, imperf выезжа́ть
    ‘arrive’ — perf прие́хать, imperf приезжа́ть

    There are also some less colloquial variants used in announcements and things:
    ‘depart’ — perf отпра́виться, imperf отправля́ться
    ‘arrive’ — perf прибы́ть, imperf прибыва́ть
    «По́езд Москва́—Владивосто́к отправля́ется с пе́рвого пути́» ‘Moscow to Vladivostok train departs from track 1’
    «По́езд Москва́—Владивосто́к прибыва́ет на пе́рвый путь» ‘Moscow to Vladivostok train arrives at track 1’
    Please correct my English

  3. #3
    Почтенный гражданин Soft sign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by justinwyllie View Post
    влететь
    влете́ть / влета́ть is ‘to fly in[to] (something)’. E.g. «Пти́ца влете́ла в окно́» ‘A bird flew in through the window’

    There’s also a word взлете́ть / взлета́ть ‘to take off’, ‘to fly up’.
    Antonio1986 and justinwyllie like this.
    Please correct my English

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    Почтенный гражданин xXHoax's Avatar
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    What in English is usually rendered as a multiple word phrase, in Russian is formed using the prefixes. (walk away for instance is analogously formed as "awaywalk")
    For all motion words the prefixes generally follow the exact same system
    with examples of лететь/летать of an airplane and airport:

    в - into (an enclosed space, i.e. a room) - into the airport (wheels on the ground sort of sense. Entered the space labeled "airport". Emphasis on entrance within a space)
    вы - out of (enclosed space) - out of the airport - emphasizes the plane passing out of the airport boundries

    при - (arrival) - "go" is to "come" as ходить приходить... Sort of. "прилететь" would be "arrive" in the context of flight. In the case of the plane, this emphasizes the plane being at the airport, as opposed to somewhere else.
    у - away - fly away улететь - emphasizes the plane being gone

    до - towards, up to. This has been explained as "a close thing moving closer", where distance has been closed. Instead of "into a space" like в-, it's more like "Up to the edge of the space/thing". Emphasis on "reaching a place".
    от - away from - emphasis on leaving the immediate vicinity of something. For instance "Уйди!" would mean "leave!" or "go away" as in stop being in my presence, whereas "Отойди!" would be "move out (of the way)" or "back away (from my personal space)".

    с - downwards, down from - emphasizing starting ON something, and ending off of it. Or just generally downcoming.
    вз - (This one is tricky, can come as вз-, вс-, воз-, or вос-, depending on the following consonant and if there's a cluster) - Upwards, up.

    за- I don't believe this one is considered to have a counterpart, but its meaning is quite interesting. It emphasizes "staying for a while" OR "going in for the sake of something"(imagine that once you'd gotten that thing, you'd leave, so it's the same come+leave together)

    et cetera


    Note that ANY of these words, made with any prefix, ходить, лететь, or other root word, all can have corresponding nouns.
    входить - вход [entrance, place one enters] , вхожд-ение [entrance, the act of entering]
    прилетать - прилёт [arrival, by flight]
    Lampada, Soft sign, Alex80 and 1 others like this.
    "В тёмные времена хорошо видно светлых людей."
    - A quote, that only exists in Russian. Erich Maria Remarque

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    Властелин maxmixiv's Avatar
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    Arrival announcement in airports would be "совершил посадку рейс №..."
    Note the difference with train stations, where imperfect "поезд №... прибывает" is used.
    Lampada likes this.
    "Невозможно передать смысл иностранной фразы, не разрушив при этом её первоначальную структуру."

  6. #6
    Увлечённый спикер
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    Ah. So a mistake with влете́ть which should have been прилете́ть - to arrive by plane. Thanks for the correction.

    And thanks to all posters. I'll have to study this page for a while.

    спасибо

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