Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: question about use of the word 'вот'

  1. #1
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    boston, ma
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    10

    question about use of the word 'вот'

    hey everyone..

    i know the general meaning of 'вот' is: here/there (it is)

    but i hear russians say it alot in mid-sentence, almost like an afterthought--like saying 'um' or 'uh' or 'so' or something similar as we do in english.

    can anyone shed some light on this for me?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Нижний Новгород
    Posts
    472
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: question about use of the word 'вот'

    Quote Originally Posted by chris86
    hey everyone..

    i know the general meaning of 'вот' is: here/there (it is)

    but i hear russians say it alot in mid-sentence, almost like an afterthought--like saying 'um' or 'uh' or 'so' or something similar as we do in english.

    can anyone shed some light on this for me?

    thanks
    Yes, right. This word is generally used to point to something (a location, an event, an object, an idea, ...). Perhaps it's somewhat similar to German "da".
    When you have nothing more to say:
    Мы поедем в Москву. Вот. - We are going to Moscow. That's it.
    In exclamations:
    Вот это да! - Wow!
    Вот, полюбуйтесь! - Just take a look at it! (in negative context)
    To put accent on something:
    Вот что он сказал. - That's what he said.
    Вот так и надо делать. That's the right way to do it.

  3. #3
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    boston, ma
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    10
    ok

    i see that it has lots of uses. (like most...prepositions? haha, what part of speech is вот?)

    but when i hear it, it's not part of a phrase like the ones you mentioned. it's completely on it's own. or it seems to be...hmm. maybe i should listen more carefully.

  4. #4
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    18
    Rep Power
    10
    Also it is a a parasite (odd) word

  5. #5
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Нижний Новгород
    Posts
    472
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by chris86
    ok

    i see that it has lots of uses. (like most...prepositions? haha, what part of speech is вот?)

    but when i hear it, it's not part of a phrase like the ones you mentioned. it's completely on it's own. or it seems to be...hmm. maybe i should listen more carefully.
    Вот is a particle. Yes, it is often misused and overused like "ну", "как бы", "в общем", "например", "короче", "типа", "это самое" etc.
    For example :
    Ну вот, короче, например, не работает у тебя почта или типа того. Тогда идешь типа к администратору, и в общем он тебе как бы делает чтобы все типа работало. Вот. Только это самое, короче, логин свой записать не забудь, а то как бы придется обратно за ним идти типа.

    P.S.
    I knew a man (a PhD and successful businessman, by the way) who almost couldn't say a sentence without inserting "как бы" a couple of times.

  6. #6
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    boston, ma
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by pisces
    Quote Originally Posted by chris86
    ok

    i see that it has lots of uses. (like most...prepositions? haha, what part of speech is вот?)

    but when i hear it, it's not part of a phrase like the ones you mentioned. it's completely on it's own. or it seems to be...hmm. maybe i should listen more carefully.
    Вот is a particle. Yes, it is often misused and overused like "ну", "как бы", "в общем", "например", "короче", "типа", "это самое" etc.
    For example :
    Ну вот, короче, например, не работает у тебя почта или типа того. Тогда идешь типа к администратору, и в общем он тебе как бы делает чтобы все типа работало. Вот. Только это самое, короче, логин свой записать не забудь, а то как бы придется обратно за ним идти типа.

    P.S.
    I knew a man (a PhD and successful businessman, by the way) who almost couldn't say a sentence without inserting "как бы" a couple of times.
    haha, yeah i've heard people say 'как бы' alot too *goes to look up what it means*
    it seems like most russians do like to repeat phrases or words alot within a sentence. but...i'm still confused. i mean, what does it *mean* when a russian (or otherwise) says that in a sentence in the way i described? could you give an english example that closely parallels it? would it be like saying '....so yeah anyway...' or '...ok so...' in mid-sentence? that's how it feels to me when i hear it, but i'm not sure. i'm still a beginner maybe it would help if i found an example, but it's more like a you have-to-hear-it kinda thing. but you prolly already know what i mean since you seem very skilled in russian...

    or you are russian?? hehe, i can't quite make out yr location there

    вот. ()

  7. #7
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Нижний Новгород
    Posts
    472
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by chris86
    haha, yeah i've heard people say 'как бы' alot too *goes to look up what it means*
    it seems like most russians do like to repeat phrases or words alot within a sentence. but...i'm still confused. i mean, what does it *mean* when a russian (or otherwise) says that in a sentence in the way i described? could you give an english example that closely parallels it? would it be like saying '....so yeah anyway...' or '...ok so...' in mid-sentence? that's how it feels to me when i hear it, but i'm not sure. i'm still a beginner maybe it would help if i found an example, but it's more like a you have-to-hear-it kinda thing. but you prolly already know what i mean since you seem very skilled in russian...

    or you are russian?? hehe, i can't quite make out yr location there

    вот. ()
    What ABBYY Lingvo dictionary says:
    как бы
    as if, as it were, as though
    это было как бы ответом it was, as it were, a reply (to), it was a kind of reply (to)
    Using a lot of such words means that the person has serious problems in expressing his ideas.
    Using "как бы" before something means "something like it, but perhaps not exactly it". So one starts to insert "как бы" before every word he is not sure about and then, when he gets used to it, even before words he is sure about.
    Yes, I am Russian.
    My location, in more detail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dzerzhinsk%2C_Russia

  8. #8
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    920
    Rep Power
    10
    i must admit, i say как бы a LOT, but im english so therefore excused i just suck up what i hear around me!
    Не откладывай на завтра того, с кем можешь переспать сегодня
    --------
    http://england-moscow.com/

  9. #9
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    379
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Lt. Columbo
    i must admit, i say как бы a LOT, but im english so therefore excused i just suck up what i hear around me!
    Apparently как бы is a relatively recent addition to the list of parasite words. I first heard it used as a useless parasite somewhere in 90s I think... Now I have to admit I use it myself sometimes... Not many of us can clearly express our thoughts!

  10. #10
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    boston, ma
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    10
    ok i get 'как бы' now. thanks

    but what about вот??

  11. #11
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: question about use of the word 'вот'

    Quote Originally Posted by chris86
    hey everyone..

    i know the general meaning of 'вот' is: here/there (it is)

    but i hear russians say it alot in mid-sentence, almost like an afterthought--like saying 'um' or 'uh' or 'so' or something similar as we do in english.

    can anyone shed some light on this for me?

    thanks
    This illustrates the problem of foreign language dictionaries. They assume that there is some one-to-one correspondence between words in two languages. Or at least a one-to-one correspondence between the meanings of words. In any case, the dictionaries are simply wrong, wrong, wrong. 'вот' does not mean "here/there is".

    It's meaning is closer to "behold" or in more modern English "see".

    Imagine someone talking in English. It was on Wednesday, see, when we were going to the movies, see. We smuggled in a bottle of vodka, see, and we got blind drunk. That's why we vomited on the street, see.

    That sounds almost normal, just a bit antiquated because sometime in the 50's Americans switched to using other words such as "like" and "right".

    In any case, none of this translates directly from Russian to English or vice versa. You have got to live in the language. I recommend that you learn one of these oddball words or phrases each week and start to use them in your own conversation. Vot, li, chto li, nu, vobshe, na samom dele, and so on. Use www.rambler.ru to find a dozen or two examples of how real russians use these words. The meaning should come clear from the context and then you can start to use them yourself.

    If you practise conversation with real russians, then they will provide good examples to imitate. But remember, the habit of using these words varies from region to region and from individual to individual. When I was in Chelyabinsk province in the south Ural, I heard "chto li" many times a day. In Moscow I once heard a Latvian girl use it as an adjective in the middle of a sentence. But my Ukrainian girlfriend almost never uses this phrase and I didn't hear it in Kiev or southern Ukraine.

  12. #12
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    10
    I forgot to mention another very important one of these words which isn't even a word. "-to" added to the end of a noun.

    "Koe chto" is another one that I heard recently.

  13. #13
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    379
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: question about use of the word 'вот'

    Quote Originally Posted by wavetossed
    If you practise conversation with real russians, then they will provide good examples to imitate.
    These are not good examples to imitate You should learn to speak without these extra words! You know what I mean, right, yeah...

  14. #14
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    10
    Chris, I feel I understand what you mean...

    "И я прехал к ним на дачу.. Вот.. Ну, и там были все мои друзья".
    "And I came to their country house... _Well_.. You see,there were all my friends"

    Just mumbling to occupy some time

  15. #15
    Властелин
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    french camp
    Posts
    1,234
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: question about use of the word 'вот'

    Quote Originally Posted by wavetossed
    It was on Wednesday, see, when we were going to the movies, see. We smuggled in a bottle of vodka, see, and we got blind drunk. That's why we vomited on the street, see.

    That sounds almost normal...

    That sounds almost normal alright
    I've got a TV, and I'm not afraid to use it

Similar Threads

  1. I have a question about the meaning of a word.
    By Soriori in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 22nd, 2010, 05:45 PM
  2. Question about Word order...
    By Hanna in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: September 1st, 2009, 03:10 PM
  3. A word! My cottage for a word!
    By radomir in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: August 14th, 2009, 10:53 AM
  4. Word order question
    By Mordan in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: October 13th, 2006, 10:27 AM
  5. question about a word
    By sperk in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 26th, 2006, 07:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary