Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: More Questions...

  1. #1
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Nightopia
    Posts
    31
    Rep Power
    8

    More Questions...

    1. Can someone explain this to me? The dialogue in my Russian book went as follows:

    (А) Вы знаете ее мужа Андрея?
    (Б) Да, я его эиаю.
    (А) А их сына зовут Миша.

    Why is the word сын declined? Is it because it's supposed to be a continuation of the person's previous sentence? Or does it have to do with using the word зовут?

    2. What's the difference between человек, лицо, люди?

    3. And this is probably a very dumb question. Do people's last names decline via their gender in Russia? For instance, does a family have one last name, but girls will write it with an а or я at the end, and guys won't?
    お前の無礼はこっちの第三言語の学

  2. #2
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreams
    (А) Вы знаете ее мужа Андрея?
    (Б) Да, я его знаю.
    (А) А их сына зовут Миша.

    Why is the word сын declined? Is it because it's supposed to be a continuation of the person's previous sentence? Or does it have to do with using the word зовут?

    2. What's the difference between человек, лицо, люди?

    3. And this is probably a very dumb question. Do people's last names decline via their gender in Russia? For instance, does a family have one last name, but girls will write it with an а or я at the end, and guys won't?
    1. It's because of "зовут". "Зовут" requires an Accusative case, hence "сына" (зовут кого? - сына).

    2. Человек - a human being, a man (gender is irrelevant). Люди - people.
    Лицо - a face, OR a person (it's used almost exclusively in legal speak and some expressions).
    For example,
    гражданское лицо — civilian
    физическое лицо — individual, natural person
    юридическое лицо — legal entity, juridical / juristic person
    частное лицо — private individual
    действующее лицо — character (in a play)

    3. YES. Last name of any family member is changed according to their gender (and it changes it's case in the sentence when needed). If you talk about the whole family or about a few family members you use plural (the same as in English): "семья Ивановых" (but father would be Иванов, and mother would be Иванова), "братья Петровы", etc.

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай it-ogo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    3,049
    Rep Power
    26

    Re: More Questions...

    3. And this is probably a very dumb question. Do people's last names decline via their gender in Russia? For instance, does a family have one last name, but girls will write it with an а or я at the end, and guys won't?
    Some of them - yes, some of them - not. Most native Russian surnames are grammatical equivalents of adjectives so they decline according to the rules of adjectives (with endings -ов/-ова, -ев/-ева, -ин/-ина, -ский/-ская). Others surnames (including foreign surnames) - not. Namely John Johnson and Mary Johnson in Russian are both Джонсон.
    "Россия для русских" - это неправильно. Остальные-то чем лучше?

  4. #4
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by it-ogo
    Some of them - yes, some of them - not. Most native Russian surnames are grammatical equivalents of adjectives so they decline according to the rules of adjectives (with endings -ов/-ова, -ев/-ева, -ин/-ина, -ский/-ская). Others surnames (including foreign surnames) - not. Namely John Johnson and Mary Johnson in Russian are both Джонсон.
    Yes, also female last names that end on "-o", "-ich", etc.
    But I don't think Dreams is ready for tackling exceptions. Not until he/she is comfortable with gender and case system.

  5. #5
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Nightopia
    Posts
    31
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: More Questions...

    Спасибо, as always! Your answers are very helpful.

    I wrote эиаю! My brain thought of the English N. Do native Cyrillic-writers have the same problem with learning English letters?

    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    But I don't think Dreams is ready for tackling exceptions. Not until he/she is comfortable with gender and case system.
    It's okay. My book mentions some of what it-ogo said. I like to be told about exceptions and such up front, so I can at least file the information away for later. Besides English, I only know Asian languages, so the gender and case rules are a work in progress for me.
    お前の無礼はこっちの第三言語の学

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreams
    Do native Cyrillic-writers have the same problem with learning English letters?
    No. Really not.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Москва, Зеленоград.
    Posts
    2,040
    Rep Power
    12

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreams
    Do native Cyrillic-writers have the same problem with learning English letters?
    Yes. Really yes. My daughter had.

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wowik
    Quote Originally Posted by Dreams
    Do native Cyrillic-writers have the same problem with learning English letters?
    Yes. Really yes. My daughter had.
    M-m... I could remember only one problem kids usually have. Beginners sometimes confuse Russian "p" ('r' sound) and English "p" in written speech. They KNOW these are different letters, but still sometimes confuse them. A habit, I suppose. Also there's a possibility that someone mixes English "c" with "s" ("с" stands for 's'-sound in Russian).

    But this is a case of confusing letters that look the same, but sound differently. I've never ever met anyone, who had problems with uniquely looking English letters ("s", "w", "q", etc.). YET.
    Maybe I should meet Wowik's daughter.

  9. #9
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    74
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: More Questions...

    Someone I know thought Petro Canada is a place where antiques are sold. Go figure...

  10. #10
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    17

    Re: More Questions...

    лицо is also used in reference to plays, for example.

    Действующие лица

    Вронский - Dreams
    Татьяна - gRomoZeka
    Онегин - it-ogo

  11. #11
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    лицо is also used in reference to plays, for example.
    I've said that. La-la-la.

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай it-ogo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    3,049
    Rep Power
    26

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    Онегин - it-ogo
    По дуле я стрелой пронзенный?
    "Россия для русских" - это неправильно. Остальные-то чем лучше?

  13. #13
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Nightopia
    Posts
    31
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    But this is a case of confusing letters that look the same, but sound differently.
    Well, that's what I meant, of course. :) Cyrillic is not really difficult otherwise. When I see В I still want to pronounce it like б, and so on...
    お前の無礼はこっちの第三言語の学

  14. #14
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreams
    Well, that's what I meant, of course.
    Oh, I see now. I just thought you were talking about "эиаю". I noticed that many beginners often confuse Russian letters that DON'T look the same.

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wowik
    Quote Originally Posted by Dreams
    Do native Cyrillic-writers have the same problem with learning English letters?
    Yes. Really yes. My daughter had.
    Maybe some children have. But not adults. Every Russian knows the Latin alphabet from childhood.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  16. #16
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Москва, Зеленоград.
    Posts
    2,040
    Rep Power
    12

    Re: More Questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    I could remember only one problem kids usually have. Beginners sometimes confuse Russian "p" ('r' sound) and English "p" in written speech.
    Yes! It is exactly her case!

Similar Threads

  1. A few questions
    By sefbarisovich in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: February 7th, 2008, 11:21 PM
  2. five questions
    By Ilkay in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 25th, 2007, 09:03 AM
  3. Some questions
    By Indra in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: August 4th, 2006, 12:15 PM
  4. Some Questions
    By Darobat in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: July 21st, 2005, 06:17 PM
  5. A few Questions
    By Darobat in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: July 6th, 2005, 01:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary