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Thread: A few sentences I need help with!!

  1. #1
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    A few sentences I need help with!!

    Hello, I would be so appreciate to anyone who can help me with this...
    I have been speaking with my soon to be daughter on the telephone once a week and there are a few things that I can't quite figure out....
    Trust me, my Russian only "gets me by"....but my daughter and I understand each other ok....its all about hearing her voice anyway...
    So here are my questions...

    What is...

    moeetsa

    ana pazvaneetye

    How do I say....

    Is she coming?

    are you going to camp?

    any other suggestions for speaking on the telephone would be greatly appreciated!!!

    Thanks!
    Jenny
    я скоро

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    moeetsa = моется = washes oneself
    pazvaneetye = позвоните = call /verb in future tense/

    Is she coming? - Она приедет?

    And what do you exactly mean saying "camp"? More context is needed to render it rightly.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  3. #3
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    camp= лагерь
    Vrei să pleci dar nu ma, nu ma iei
    Nu ma, nu ma iei, nu ma, nu ma, nu ma iei
    Chipul tau si dragostea din tei
    Mi-amintesc de ochii tai

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Евгения Белякова
    camp= лагерь
    I think here she used camp as a verb because otherwise an article would be needed, no?
    "Happy new year, happy new year
    May we all have a vision now and then
    Of a world where every neighbour is a friend"

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    Quote Originally Posted by RUSKYMOMMA
    are you going to camp?
    I am sure that camp is a noun here.
    This is one of those exceptions to the English language where an article is not needed. It is like the word "school". Are you going to school?

    If she wanted to use the verb "to camp", it would be
    Are you going camping?
    Are you going to camp-out?
    Какая разница, умереть богатым или бедным?

    Какой толк от богатства если ты не счастлив.

  6. #6
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    "Are you going to camp?" can be a place (noun, a place where you are camped) or a verb (to camp) in this instance.

    Only the speaker can know for sure what is meant.
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

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    Using it as a noun without an article in that context is purely AmE I think. In BrE you'd have to say "Are you going to the camp?".

    It's a liguistic side-effect of a cultural difference. Americans have a place called "camp", wheras in Blighty we have no such thing.

    Incidentally, in Scotland we use the definite article with words that don't need them in England (or the US presumably), such as "school", or "hospital", or "church", as in the sentence "Are you going to the school?"

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    Hello! I am so sorry it took so long for me to get back here!! Things have been crazy and we may be traveling to Russia at the end of July to get her!!
    Thank you everyone for your responses...

    As far as the camp goes....I did mean Are you going to the camp...
    There is a summer camp that the kids go to and she hadn't gone yet....I was wanting to ask her if she was going and when.

    Here are a few others I don't know...

    pustie (what would the Russian meaning be of this?)

    How would I ask this?
    can you tell her for me?

    I feel like I have the most trouble with asking questions like....What do you think....or When will we come to court.... come and go are the words I always get mixed up with....
    come home.....Go to the store....

    if anyone has time to explain this I would greatly appreciate it!!!
    я скоро

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    Pustie means "Let me go"

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    Thanks.
    я скоро

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    Quote Originally Posted by CTPEKO3A
    Pustie means "Let me go"
    that would be "pustite". there is no word "pustie". there is a word (pust') though, which is a particle implying a suggestion, like "pust' ona vam napishet".

    How would I ask this? - (if about a translation: kak eto budet po russki/kak mne skazat' eto po russki, or more generally, "kak ob etom luchshe sprosit'?")
    can you tell her (about something) for me? - ne mogli by vy ei peredat' (chto...)

    there are way too many words in russian that translate into 'come' and 'go' (and they are all irregular), it's just the nature of the language, i guess the best ones depend on the context but you will probably be understood if you just learn a couple, like idti (imperf) and pojti (perf) for go and i prijti (perf) for come.

    i suspect some of the things i wrote above might be incorrect in standard literary russian, i've never been strong on speech standards. but 99% of ppl won't notice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by laxxy
    there are way too many words in russian that translate into 'come' and 'go' (and they are all irregular), it's just the nature of the language, i guess the best ones depend on the context but you will probably be understood if you just learn a couple, like idti (imperf) and pojti (perf) for go and i prijti (perf) for come.
    thinking about it some more, you will also need words like poehat' i priehat', as the ones i wrote above are usually no good if your means of transportation is anything but walking, and if you are not describing a routine activity.
    Like, you can say "poidem v kino" even if you plan to drive to the movies. But you can not say "my k tebe pridem" if you are in the US and she is in Russia.

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    Sorry, but there is a word "pustie" or "otpustie"
    For example: "Пусти меня гулять, мама"
    "Отпусти меня немедленно!"
    If we are talking about a kid... There is a situation: I am holding my son's hand in the supermarket. He sees candies and desperately wants to go get them. But I keep holding him. "Пусти!" would be the most appropriate word out of his mouth at that moment, accompanied by little whining. (Telling you from personal experience )
    Пусть is also a word, but different one.

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    Does пусти and отпусти mean the same thing? Would it be wrong for him to say "Отпусти!" ?
    Vrei să pleci dar nu ma, nu ma iei
    Nu ma, nu ma iei, nu ma, nu ma, nu ma iei
    Chipul tau si dragostea din tei
    Mi-amintesc de ochii tai

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    No, it wouldn't. But he is a kid, he says simple things, shorter words.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CTPEKO3A
    Sorry, but there is a word "pustie" or "otpustie"
    For example: "Пусти меня гулять, мама"
    "Отпусти меня немедленно!"
    If we are talking about a kid... There is a situation: I am holding my son's hand in the supermarket. He sees candies and desperately wants to go get them. But I keep holding him. "Пусти!" would be the most appropriate word out of his mouth at that moment, accompanied by little whining. (Telling you from personal experience )
    Пусть is also a word, but different one.
    ok my bad, you are right of course - didnt recognize it here.

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    Пусти меня гулять, мама

    Is this a song??
    я скоро

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    I don't know. We can make it a song

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    Quote Originally Posted by RUSKYMOMMA
    Пусти меня гулять, мама

    Is this a song??
    I believe it is from Виновата ли я

    Ой, ты, мама, моя, ой, ты, мама, моя,
    Отпусти ты меня погулять,
    Ночью звезды горят, ночью ласки дарят,
    Ночью все о любви говорят.

    Great song BTW
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

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