Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: English and USA English Translations

  1. #1
    DDT
    DDT is offline
    Завсегдатай DDT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    I have given up the Gambling, the Wine and the Cows!.. I'm back now! ....nope Im gone again!
    Posts
    3,364
    Rep Power
    14

    English and USA English Translations

    If anone is interested.



    http://englishclub.8m.com/ukus1.htm
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

  2. #2
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Сварга
    Posts
    1,391
    Rep Power
    12
    DDT
    thank you for the link

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    In many cases this list may be useful, but as always, I'd take it with a grain of salt. Basically, everything on that first page, for instance, that is said to be dated is NOT dated. Many "translations" provided are either really unwieldy (Chat flirtatiously? If someone said that to me, I'd think they were from Mars.
    How about just 'chat' or 'flirt'?) or just plain out-of-fashion/not spoken naturally (buttocks=usually "butt," plastic wrap = "Saran wrap" (brandname), tractor-trailer = many times, just 'semi', I think most Americans would say "hamburger bun" or "bun", ie it's not regional, etc. ). If you have specific questions about words, it may be safer to ask others on this forum than to trust the list.
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

  4. #4
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Residing in an unknown place
    Posts
    1,400
    Rep Power
    11
    In many cases this list may be useful, but as always, I'd take it with a grain of salt. Basically, everything on that first page, for instance, that is said to be dated is NOT dated. Many "translations" provided are either really unwieldy (Chat flirtatiously? If someone said that to me, I'd think they were from Mars.
    How about just 'chat' or 'flirt'?) or just plain out-of-fashion/not spoken naturally (buttocks=usually "butt," plastic wrap = "Saran wrap" (brandname), tractor-trailer = many times, just 'semi', I think most Americans would say "hamburger bun" or "bun", ie it's not regional, etc. ). If you have specific questions about words, it may be safer to ask others on this forum than to trust the list.
    It's hard for me to determine how dated the words on the first page are but I want to say that it's not critical that you don't know a British equiavalent of some word. I mean- - if you know a word "faucet', you oughtn't to know the British equivalent - tap. And vice versa. I think that everyone should decide for themselves which dialect of English to study. If you've been studying American English from the very beginning and you're going to Australia, you should probably devote some time to learning the most important equivalents used in Australia.
    "A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read"
    Mark Twain
    American author/essayist (1835-1910)
    WHSmith

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by ReDSanchous
    It's hard for me to determine how dated the words on the first page are but I want to say that it's not critical that you don't know a British equiavalent of some word. I mean- - if you know a word "faucet', you oughtn't to know the British equivalent - tap. And vice versa. I think that everyone should decide for themselves which dialect of English to study. If you've been studying American English from the very beginning and you're going to Australia, you should probably devote some time to learning the most important equivalents used in Australia.
    For the most part you are right -- if you told me turn something "anticlockwise" I'd probably look at you funny, but I'd understand. Still, if you asked me if we had any "aubergines" for sale, I'd have NO clue what you're talking about. Still, I think the "standard" form typically taught abroad is "British English" right?

    And I'm still confused where they heard that "car battery" was outdated. What are we supposed to say then? "My car won't start; I need a new electric black boxy thingamajigger?" Is that a critical piece of vocabulary for the Russian folks on here? No. But I guess it's just the principal of the thing, and frankly, not having read the entire list, nor being any authoritatvie source, it leads me to question the overall veracity of the list. I assure you that we still have plenty of "badgers" roaming the wilderness and even though "propellers" may be outdated as a technology for aircraft, every single American knows exactly what a propeller is.

    Sorry for the ranting...
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

  6. #6
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Residing in an unknown place
    Posts
    1,400
    Rep Power
    11
    For the most part you are right -- if you told me turn something "anticlockwise" I'd probably look at you funny, but I'd understand. Still, if you asked me if we had any "aubergines" for sale, I'd have NO clue what you're talking about. Still, I think the "standard" form typically taught abroad is "British English" right?

    And I'm still confused where they heard that "car battery" was outdated. What are we supposed to say then? "My car won't start; I need a new electric black boxy thingamajigger?" Is that a critical piece of vocabulary for the Russian folks on here? No. But I guess it's just the principal of the thing, and frankly, not having read the entire list, nor being any authoritatvie source, it leads me to question the overall veracity of the list. I assure you that we still have plenty of "badgers" roaming the wilderness and even though "propellers" may be outdated as a technology for aircraft, every single American knows exactly what a propeller is.

    Sorry for the ranting...
    Frankly speaking, it's quite possible to learn all those equivalents if you want to or need to. I honestly don't feel like learning that whole list. I'd far rather learn some other new words. That will be a lot more useful! Yes, you're right that British English is the standard here. I don't really know why. My guess is that the Soviet government disliked the USA and forbad teaching American English. Perhaps, the verb "forbid" is inappropriate here but I don't know how else to put this into English.

    It's good for you, guys, that we don't have this kind of differences in Russian. A word that is understood in Moscow will normally be understood elsewhere in Russia.

    I couldn't care less about the veracity of that website because I'm not going to use it anyway
    "A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read"
    Mark Twain
    American author/essayist (1835-1910)
    WHSmith

  7. #7
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St. Louis, USA
    Posts
    353
    Rep Power
    10
    I always thought British English was the standard form of english taught in most places because, at one point or another, the British probably occupied that country. At any rate, after looking at this list, and as others have said, don't put too much stock in it. A lot of the things it lists as 'dated' or 'regional' just simply isn't true.

    tdk

  8. #8
    DDT
    DDT is offline
    Завсегдатай DDT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    I have given up the Gambling, the Wine and the Cows!.. I'm back now! ....nope Im gone again!
    Posts
    3,364
    Rep Power
    14
    I think that you are missing the point Bar ol' boy. When it is stated that something is out dated it is stating it from the British point of view. Meaning that The English are starting to use the American word. It is interesting to me to note that some of these words I still use after all these years in the US ie "anticlockwise" I had no idea until now that I had been using a different word than most Americans use. I quit using "bonnet" right away but it must have taken me several years to figure out what a "faucet" was.
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

  9. #9
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Residing in an unknown place
    Posts
    1,400
    Rep Power
    11
    And what do you think now? You wrote that you always thought that....bla-bla-bla... I think that the British pronunciation's regarded as the standard.
    "A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read"
    Mark Twain
    American author/essayist (1835-1910)
    WHSmith

  10. #10
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St. Louis, USA
    Posts
    353
    Rep Power
    10
    All I know is that American's don't speak English

  11. #11
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Residing in an unknown place
    Posts
    1,400
    Rep Power
    11
    That's very interesting!!! Do you they speak American? Is my guess right?
    "A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read"
    Mark Twain
    American author/essayist (1835-1910)
    WHSmith

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by DDT
    I think that you are missing the point Bar ol' boy. When it is stated that something is out dated it is stating it from the British point of view. Meaning that The English are starting to use the American word.
    I understand what you are saying; and if you're telling me that it's "accumulator" and not "car battery" and so forth, that's outdated, then so be it. *sigh* This is the problem with translating from English to English.

    It is interesting to me to note that some of these words I still use after all these years in the US ie "anticlockwise" I had no idea until now that I had been using a different word than most Americans use. I quit using "bonnet" right away but it must have taken me several years to figure out what a "faucet" was.
    Yet, oddly enough, we use "faucets" to get our "tap water" (I've never heard of someone asking about "faucet water"). Go figure. For what it's worth, you do find "tap" in usage too; I'd say it's probably not quite as common -- and maybe regional? Oh, and wise choice on the bonnet - lol -- you'd probably get strange looks for that one, since typically only women and infants wear bonnets!
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

  13. #13
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    My Time & Space
    Posts
    6,559
    Rep Power
    16
    Americans have been cherishing the futile thought that their language is truely American. How wrong they are!
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  14. #14
    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA пляж
    Posts
    648
    Rep Power
    10
    England and America are two countries separated by a common language.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Barmaley
    Quote Originally Posted by ReDSanchous
    It's hard for me to determine how dated the words on the first page are but I want to say that it's not critical that you don't know a British equiavalent of some word. I mean- - if you know a word "faucet', you oughtn't to know the British equivalent - tap. And vice versa. I think that everyone should decide for themselves which dialect of English to study. If you've been studying American English from the very beginning and you're going to Australia, you should probably devote some time to learning the most important equivalents used in Australia.
    For the most part you are right -- if you told me turn something "anticlockwise" I'd probably look at you funny, but I'd understand. Still, if you asked me if we had any "aubergines" for sale, I'd have NO clue what you're talking about. Still, I think the "standard" form typically taught abroad is "British English" right?

    And I'm still confused where they heard that "car battery" was outdated. What are we supposed to say then? "My car won't start; I need a new electric black boxy thingamajigger?" Is that a critical piece of vocabulary for the Russian folks on here? No. But I guess it's just the principal of the thing, and frankly, not having read the entire list, nor being any authoritatvie source, it leads me to question the overall veracity of the list. I assure you that we still have plenty of "badgers" roaming the wilderness and even though "propellers" may be outdated as a technology for aircraft, every single American knows exactly what a propeller is.

    Sorry for the ranting...
    The translations are explanations. It isn't saying it's what you'd say in everyday speach. You can't explain "Chat up" in one word.
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  16. #16
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    16
    ReDSanchous,
    >A word that is understood in Moscow will normally be understood elsewhere in Russia.


    Московская булка = СПб батон
    М подъезд = СПб лестница.

    The last time I was in SPb I saw лестница and thought it very strange until I read about the vocab differences! But I suppose a native would know these differences.

  17. #17
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    I think there may be a different word that is sometimes used for "entrance," also; but I think the overall point with regards the Russian "mainland" still holds up. What I would be interested to know is whether it does so with regard to other places where Russian is spoken -- maybe Kazakhstan, the Baltic states, or even Kaliningrad (which I know IS part of Russia), since after all, we are comparing a colony with the mother country over a period of hundreds of years. I would suspect -- with very little research, it's just a hunch -- that the Russian spoken there may be somewhat different than in Russia proper. Of course there are many reasons why it would change or wouldn't change -- or more likely the language will completely die out; indigenous American languages were destroyed, in a practical every day sense, whereas, say, Latvian wasn't.
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

Similar Threads

  1. Help with English to Abkhazian translations
    By mavericker in forum All other languages
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 15th, 2008, 03:49 AM
  2. Dostoyevskiy Translations to English
    By MasterAdmin in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: November 23rd, 2007, 11:23 PM
  3. Free Russian-English-English dictionaries for a Pocket PC?
    By Анатолий in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 21st, 2007, 10:43 AM
  4. Perfect English (A question to native English speakers)
    By Ramil in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 109
    Last Post: September 25th, 2006, 10:52 PM
  5. Help with Russian to English Translations
    By Sputnik1 in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: June 18th, 2006, 11:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary