Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Головной убор

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Головной убор

    How do you say "головной убор" in English? It's a part of attire you wear on you head (a hat, a bonnet, anything, actually).
    Eg. Индейцы носили головные уборы из перьев.

    There are different words for any of these things, but how can I call them in general? And what word can I use for it if I don't know how this specific "головной убор" is called?

  2. #2
    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    СССР -> США
    Posts
    17,615
    Rep Power
    31

    Re: Головной убор

    "...Важно, чтобы форум оставался местом, объединяющим людей, для которых интересны русский язык и культура. ..." - MasterАdmin (из переписки)



  3. #3
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: Головной убор

    Cool! Thank you.

  4. #4
    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    СССР -> США
    Posts
    17,615
    Rep Power
    31

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    Cool! Thank you.
    You are welcome.
    "...Важно, чтобы форум оставался местом, объединяющим людей, для которых интересны русский язык и культура. ..." - MasterАdmin (из переписки)



  5. #5
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    How do you say "головной убор" in English? It's a part of attire you wear on you head (a hat, a bonnet, anything, actually).
    Eg. Индейцы носили головные уборы из перьев.

    There are different words for any of these things, but how can I call them in general? And what word can I use for it if I don't know how this specific "головной убор" is called?
    I don't believe we have a direct translation of that, at least not in the way I remember it used when I was in Ukraine. We just call it by its name, i.e. 'hat', 'cap', 'hood', 'headscarf', etc. BTW, nobody wears bonnets anymore.

    Yes, you could use "headgear", "headwear", or "headdress" (for tribal natives), but it would sound weird to use those terms in everyday speech. At the very least it would sound like you were trying to humorous.

    If you need to be general, I would just say 'hat', which basically covers any non-specific type of head covering.
    For example:

    "Я никуда не иду без головного убора."
    "I don't go anywhere without a hat."
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    "Я никуда не иду без головного убора."
    Sounds a bit odd to me. I think I'd say "Я никогда не хожу без головного убора".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  7. #7
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: Головной убор

    [quote=Оля]
    Quote Originally Posted by "Matroskin Kot":3k7adsgn
    "Я никуда не иду без головного убора."
    Sounds a bit odd to me. I think I'd say "Я никогда не хожу без головного убора".[/quote:3k7adsgn]

    Русское предложение пришло в голову, но английская версия не совсем точно выражает первый мысл. А ты говоришь, что вообще неестественно звучит мой русский вариант?

    В первом предложении я имел в виду: "I refuse to go out without a hat." Теперь как?
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Русское предложение пришло в голову, но английская версия не совсем точно выражает первый мысл. А ты говоришь, что вообще неестественно звучит мой русский вариант?

    В первом предложении я имел в виду: "I refuse to go out without a hat." Теперь как?
    Общий смысл фразы понятен, неважно, что написано в английском варианте.
    "Я никуда не иду" звучит неестественно в этом контексте. Можно было бы еще сказать "Я никогда не выхожу из дома без головного убора", но это длиннее, чем "я никогда не хожу...".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  9. #9
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    837
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Головной убор

    [quote=Matroskin Kot][quote="Оля":3dddis7t]
    Quote Originally Posted by "Matroskin Kot":3dddis7t
    "Я никуда не иду без головного убора."
    Sounds a bit odd to me. I think I'd say "Я никогда не хожу без головного убора".[/quote:3dddis7t]

    Русское предложение пришло в голову, но английская версия не совсем точно выражает первый мысл. А ты говоришь, что вообще неестественно звучит мой русский вариант?

    В первом предложении я имел в виду: "I refuse to go out without a hat." Теперь как?[/quote:3dddis7t]
    You mean, as a part of a conversation, as in

    "Put that hat back and let's go."
    "I refuse to go out without a hat."

    If so, then "Я никуда не иду без ..." is ok.
    "Я никуда не пойду..." is more usual, though.

  10. #10
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by E-learner
    If so, then "Я никуда не иду без ..." is ok.
    "Я никуда не пойду..." is more usual, though.
    They simply have different meaning. "Я никуда не пойду..." means "I won't go without my hat!"

    "Я никуда не иду без ..." still sounds strange to me...
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  11. #11
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    837
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    They simply have different meaning. "Я никуда не пойду..." means "I won't go without my hat!"
    That's exactly what I thought, that "I refuse to go" was meant as "I won't go".

  12. #12
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: Головной убор

    [quote=Оля]
    Quote Originally Posted by "E-learner":xapxurth
    If so, then "Я никуда не иду без ..." is ok.
    "Я никуда не пойду..." is more usual, though.
    They simply have different meaning. "Я никуда не пойду..." means "I won't go without my hat!"
    [/quoteapxurth]

    Вот теперь я вижу свою ошибку. Надо было сказать "пойду" вместо "иду". Если так, то все нормально?
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  13. #13
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Вот теперь я вижу свою ошибку.
    А я свою.

    Общий смысл фразы понятен, неважно, что написано в английском варианте.


    Yes, "я никуда не пойду" sounds perfect.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  14. #14
    Увлечённый спикер
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The USA
    Posts
    43
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot

    If you need to be general, I would just say 'hat', which basically covers any non-specific type of head covering.
    For example:

    "Я никуда не иду без головного убора."
    "I don't go anywhere without a hat."
    Can I say, "I don't go anywhere with my hair uncovered"?

    And, by the way, Matroskin Kot, if you don't mind, the Russian phrase I would rather say differently, "Я никуда не хожу беэ головного убора." It just sounds more natural to my Russian ear...
    "Меньше малого довольно, чтобы сердце взволновать; больше самого большого надо, чтоб его разбить."
    Anne Brontё, "Agnes Grey"

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparrow
    And, by the way, Matroskin Kot, if you don't mind, the Russian phrase I would rather say differently, "Я никуда не хожу беэ головного убора." It just sounds more natural to my Russian ear...
    Может, сначала всю тему прочитаете?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  16. #16
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparrow

    Can I say, "I don't go anywhere with my hair uncovered"?
    Yes, absolutely. It's sounds perfectly natural from a language point of view. However, it implies that you have an unusual concern about your hair, as if you are afraid that exposing it to the elements will harm it, or ruin your hairdo.

    You could say, "I don't go anywhere with my head uncovered." That would sound more neutral.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  17. #17
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    [s:23mdo7ra]It's[/s:23mdo7ra] It sounds perfectly natural
    Бе-бе-беееееееее. :P :P
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  18. #18
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: Головной убор

    [quote=Оля]
    Quote Originally Posted by "Matroskin Kot":dwy81woj
    [s:dwy81woj]It's[/s:dwy81woj] It sounds perfectly natural
    Бе-бе-беееееееее. :P :P [/quote:dwy81woj]

    Ой, я попался!

    Молодец! Это было... проверка... да, точно! Проверка! И ты справилась. Хорошая работа. Только будь внимательна ведь никто не знает когда я допущу... м-м-м, вернее, устрою еще одну "проверку".
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  19. #19
    Увлечённый спикер
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The USA
    Posts
    43
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Головной убор

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparrow

    Can I say, "I don't go anywhere with my hair uncovered"?
    Yes, absolutely. It's sounds perfectly natural from a language point of view. However, it implies that you have an unusual concern about your hair, as if you are afraid that exposing it to the elements will harm it, or ruin your hairdo.

    You could say, "I don't go anywhere with my head uncovered." That would sound more neutral.

    Спасибо, Кот Матроскин!
    "Меньше малого довольно, чтобы сердце взволновать; больше самого большого надо, чтоб его разбить."
    Anne Brontё, "Agnes Grey"

  20. #20
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: Головной убор

    Thank you, guys.

    But what if I need to use some general word, and "hats" (or "headwear") doesn't fit? Say, there's an assembled crowd of people in various hats, turbans, headscarfs, helmets, etc. And what if I need to write a sign to the visitors which says something like: "When the bell rings please take off your ... and put it on the ground"? Will it be ok to use the word "hats" (when most of these ppl most likely have some other kind of headwear)? Would not some or the other people think that the sign doesn't apply to them?

    What would you write?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary