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Thread: Pronouniation of "j"

  1. #1
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    Pronouniation of "j"

    Whenever Serbian/Bosnian/Croatian words are written in Latin, is "j" always pronounced as "zh" or it can be "y" (as in "yes") as well? I am interested in words like:

    nedelja/nedjelja/nedzhelja
    devojka/djevojka/dzhevojka
    gdje
    uvijek
    rijeka
    lijep
    ovdje
    ~ Мастерадминов Мастерадмин Мастерадминович ~

  2. #2
    Подающий надежды оратор
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    It's always, always pronounced "y" as in "yes"
    'Only the best people fight against all obstacles in pursuit of happiness'

    "...everywhere he goes, including where he lives, also strikes him as foreign; the point is, he's always the foreigner." ~ John Irving

  3. #3
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    By itself is it pronounced like the Y in yes, it never makes anything even close to a z sound. But when preceded by a L, it makes a sound which doesn't exist in the English language. I am unsure if it exists in the Russian language. In Serbian Cyrillic, you would not write lj, you would write љ for example недеља but in Croatian/Bosnian they use latin so they have to write lj.

    By the way I have never heard the words nedzhelja or dzhevojka with the z in them, so either you mispelled them or they are from some obscure village dialect that 99% of people wouldn't understand.

  4. #4
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    By the way I have never heard the words nedzhelja or dzhevojka with the z in them, so either you mispelled them or they are from some obscure village dialect that 99% of people wouldn't understand.
    ouch.

  5. #5
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    Maybe the result of the confusion is that some people write đ as dj when using English latin letters. Those words do not have a dž (same as Russian дж) or đ (similar to dž but softer) in them.

    J is the same as the german j or English y. The letters lj and nj is just a soft l and soft n sound respectively such as ль and нь in Russian.

    Hope this helps.
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