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Thread: Two Phrases Requested.

  1. #1
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    Two Phrases Requested.

    Hi you nice native speakers out there,

    I would like to know how to translate the following:

    Take it easy and Juliusz, it is your turn now.

    Thank you in advance.

    PS: Should any of you have trouble with German, do not hesitate to ask me.
    I think, therefore I am.

  2. #2
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    as for the "take it easy" phrase, it actually depends greatly on the context, but in most of the cases it would simply be "spokojnie".

    "Juliusz, it's your turn now" -> Juliusz(u), teraz Twoja kolej.

    I put the "u" in brackets 'cause in theory, there should be the Wołacz case used (i.e. "Juliuszu") , but truth be told - hardly anyone ever uses it in everyday speech, unless it's for laugh. In most situations it just sounds a tiny bit funny.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    I put the "u" in brackets 'cause in theory, there should be the Wołacz case used (i.e. "Juliuszu") , but truth be told - hardly anyone ever uses it in everyday speech, unless it's for laugh. In most situations it just sounds a tiny bit funny.
    Just like in Russian the old vocative (старозвательный падеж).
    Could you please occasionally correct my stupid errors!
    Korrigiert bitte ab und zu meine dummen Fehler!

  4. #4
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    Thank you very much for your help, Kamka. Just by the way, would you mind answering my questions concerning the Polish language, I mean, whatever they may be (e.g. grammar, phrases, proofreading of short textes, idioms, etc.) and whenever possible?

    Again, thank you very much for your help.
    I think, therefore I am.

  5. #5
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    nope, I don't mind answering your questions at all, I just hope I will be able to provide you with the answers as clear and comprehensible as you wish

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    I put the "u" in brackets 'cause in theory, there should be the Wołacz case used (i.e. "Juliuszu") , but truth be told - hardly anyone ever uses it in everyday speech, unless it's for laugh. In most situations it just sounds a tiny bit funny.
    Wow!
    But what about "Matko Boska"?

    Now vocative case is in use only in Ukranian

    Quote Originally Posted by Анекдот
    На Крещатике у магазина со спортивной обувью:
    - Мамо! Купи мне Reebok!
    - Яких тэбэ рибок? У тэбе еще хомяк не сдох!

  7. #7
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    of course, there are some cases in which you will use the Vocative (eg. the mentioned Matko Boska), but it's not very common in everyday speech. When it comes to names though, it usually is used to make it sound more formal, but in a funny way.
    You do say, however "mamo" or "tato" regulary.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    of course, there are some cases in which you will use the Vocative (eg. the mentioned Matko Boska), but it's not very common in everyday speech. When it comes to names though, it usually is used to make it sound more formal, but in a funny way.
    You do say, however "mamo" or "tato" regulary.
    From WiKi:
    In informal speech, the nominative is increasingly used in place of the vocative, but this is regarded as a bad style in any formal situation
    So I could be a little funny if speak in "formal style" in informal sutuation, couldn't I?


    My grandmother call my mother "Juliuś!" but vocative would be "Juliusiu!"?

    But concernig another words is vocative still in use in Polish?
    In formal situations I think better to say:
    Panie konduktorze!
    Panie profesorze!

    But what is true in informal situation?
    Kochanie (Darling)!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wowik
    From WiKi:
    In informal speech, the nominative is increasingly used in place of the vocative, but this is regarded as a bad style in any formal situation
    So I could be a little funny if speak in "formal style" in informal sutuation, couldn't I?


    My grandmother call my mother "Juliuś!" but vocative would be "Juliusiu!"?

    But concernig another words is vocative still in use in Polish?
    In formal situations I think better to say:
    Panie konduktorze!
    Panie profesorze!

    But what is true in informal situation?
    Kochanie (Darling)!
    yes, the vocative of "Juliuś" is "Juliusiu"; I have a friend whose name is also Julia and she is very often called by her mother in vocative - "Julinko".
    I am sometimes reffered to as "Kamilko" (a demunitive of my name), but hardly ever "Kamilo", as far as the usage of the vocative is concerned.
    The vocative pretty much depends on the speaker, I don't think people pay much attention to it. I sure don't anyway.

    As for the "kochanie" question, I don't think I understand what you mean?

    in situations you've mentioned like "panie profesorze" it is simply impossible to use a different form, it would not only be inpolite, but also incomprehensible.

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