Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian conflict

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian conflict

    Edit: That's my translation of the article, not my article.
    The original text in Russian here: http://e-grishkovets.livejournal.com/48256.html

    I understand that the text is very long, but maybe someone could find time to correct some of my mistakes, or maybe to correct the text in parts. Please.

    ---

    I've read George Kennan's utterance which says that Russia's neighbours are either vassals or enemies, and I was rolling this maxim around in my mind again and again. What is it about this utterance that makes me indignant and why do I want so much to say something against that? At first sight everything is correct, however offensive it is, but correct. You look at the map, and you see that it's how it is. Although we border also on China which is neither our enemy nor our vassal. Although India is not that far from us, too. But the rest of our neighbours... So why do I revolt and why do I not agree with the Mr. Kennan's utterance? And I know why. Because who says that? Who is Kennan, remind me please? He's an American!

    To talk about neighbours, is easy to Americans. They, somehow, almost don't have neighbours. But if for Russia all the neighbours are either enemies or vassals, for America only continuous stretch of neighbours exists in the world. And if some country and its inhabitants don't count themselves neither enemies nor vassals in respect of America, America count every country either one or the other. It's only that America doesn't go into details neither of national nor religious nor cultural peculiarities. America and Americans somehow distinctly don't want to know anything about anyone except themselves. And they can't even imagine that completely different consciousness and opinion could exist. What is Mr. Kennan's sentence about? About something what he sees in the mirror. He only thinks it's not his own reflection in it.

    But allow me to say what I think about us and our neighbours. I'll say that not from the State of Russia's position, but from my own, purely private one. I was born and grew up in Russia. Or, I should rather say, in the Soviet Union. And now, I live in the Russia which Mr. Kennan is talking about. I was born in the Soviet Union, and all those, now neighbouring, countries enter into my geographical conception of Homeland. And that means all this is a territory of love. And the majority of people who live in Russia feel the same. Russian people, unlike Mr. Kennan, know geography, they know different national cultures, they have friends, relatives and colleagues in the neighbouring countries. Unlike Mr. Kennan, they take to heart every conflict situation which happens between Russia and its neighbours. There are many of such situations, and everything is very complicated.

    If we go deep into Mr. Kennan's sentence, Russia only has enemies. Because any vassal is always a potencial enemy. Vassals don't love their master, it's impossible. From this point of view America is in a much worse condition. Who loves America? Tell me!

    I was in Tbilisi two weeks before the South-Ossetian conflict began. I stayed at "Sheraton" hotel. In Tbilisi, it's one of the best and most expensive. The hotel was not full. Only few tourists and very, very many Amercian military specialist lived in it. Judging by their stripes, they were airmen and missile specialists. These American soldiers evidently enjoyed staying at a good inn. They obviously were not used to such good conditions and to chic hotels. But at that, they always wore the field dress, without finding it necessary to put on the full one. They were wrinkled, unbuttoned, free-and-easy. They were indifferent about the beautiful, ancient city Tbilisi. They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant worn in accordance with the evening time and the restaurant's level. They were speaking loudly, laughing boisterously and even didn't suppose that someone could understand what they were talking about. They regarded all the people who surrounded them as absent in their life. They, obviously, didn't care about Georgia. They conduct themselves in the same way at any US military base. You think Georgians treated those soldiers with sympathy? No! But me, and my friends, Georgians were very glad to see. The purpose of my visit was discussing our mutual theatrical plans, and also the outlook for opening of Russian Book's Shop in Tbilisi. We went to the restoring Georgian Penmen's House where was and will be a literary museum. In this building, Griboyedov and Pushkin formerly were reading their works. We agreed then that I will come again and read my new stories there and present my manuscripts to the museum.

    We have talked a lot those days, were remembering and quoting our favourite Georgian and Russian films which people in our countries know by heart. I make many trips in Ukraine, in the Baltic states, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Georgia, Armenia, with my performances. I go not to enemies and not to vassals.

    How easy to say that about Russia! How easy, in general, to say such things about others! And how easy to draw borders! I recall, once in Switzerland, a journalist at the press conference asked me if I count myself an European. I replied, "There is no sense to answer this question since one who asks me doesn't count me an European." I know, what I'm writing now, will read people in Germany. I'd like to ask a question, a rhetorical one: perhaps in Europe all have good-neighbour relations with each other? What, Frenchs love Germans, and vice versa? What, all adore Britons? What, Belgians dote upon the Dutch? Even life in one house, if there are several flats in it, is always not simple. Completely unclouded and untroubled relations between neighbours are impossible. The best and most comfortable thing is living without neighbours. In many respects, that's how America tends to live.
    I spent so much time speaking on the phone on the most hot days of the Georgian-South Ossetian conflict. My Georgian friends and I, we were talking so much, and if we were even not be able to come to an agreement, we were assuring each other of love and friendship. In the same way I was talking with my Ukrainian friends who were terribly agitated by the Caucasian developments. We talked much and we keep talking. That's not how it could be between enemies or vassals.

    I was watching eagerly the newscasts. At one moment I was watching our mass media, at another CNN, at another BBC. The pictures were alike both here and there. The comments were diametrically different. Nobody touched on the truth which always is in the middle. It's us who's in the middle. We are who now lives in this world. We always are in the middle.

    Do you know what makes me glad about the manner in which Russian television channels presented information? And it differs very much from the way how they showed the Chechen campaign or reports about terrorist acts. In the reports from the South Ossetia were few or almost were not shown Georgian soldiers – neither captive, nor killed nor fighting. At that, European and American channels showed many of Russian soldiers. In Russia, a decision must have been made - not to create a scary, enemy image of a Georgian. It's a very good sign. And I have never been Putin's worshipper, have never been a worshipper of his politic style, but what he said in his interview to CNN, that he takes the military operations between the Russian and the Georgian armies as a civil war - this is very important. That's not what people usually say about enemies or vassals.

    To Americans, who mix up the name 'Grusia' with the name of their state Georgia, it never occurred how much hard people in Russia took this conflict. And how much hard Georgians take it. In july, I was talking to a very famous Georgian writer, his name doesn't matter. He's old and wise. He was talking about Saakashvili then, evidently trying to apologize for the president of his country. He said, "You see, Zhenya, Saakashvili is a very ill-mannered man. But you should understand Georgians. We are small and proud. And we want people to talk about us, to know about us. Saakashvili made things in such a way that everyone is talking about us. Even if in a bad manner, but every day." And these words explain much. But explain only to the people who knows Georgia and loves it, in other words to us who lives in Russia. But those who don't know and don't understand this marvellous country's peculiarities are indifferent about that. I will never believe in sincerity of Americans' care about Georgia. I won't believe in sincerity of their slogans and appeals for defence of democracy, I won't believe that Americans don't see and don't understand Mikhail Saakashvili's essence. And I won't believe that Americans count him and Georgia a friend. For them, Georgia is not an enemy or a vassal, but just a card or a chip in their game. A chip in which you don't feel living people, history, long-standing human relations.

    So virtually, Mr. Kennan said a thing which is hard to dispute. Especially if watch CNN. I can repeat his words, but addressing America. It's only that I won't be quoted. That’s the whole difference.

    Yevgeni Grishkovetz, a Russian writer.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  2. #2
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    The peoples state of New Jersey
    Posts
    1,137
    Rep Power
    17

    Re: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian confli

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    I understand that the text is very long, but maybe someone could find time to correct some of my mistakes, or maybe to correct the text in parts. Please.

    ---

    I've read George Kennan's utterance which says that Russia's neighbours are either vassals or enemies, and I was rolling this maxim around in my mind again and again. What is it about this utterance that makes me indignant and why do I want so much to say something against that? At first sight everything is correct, however offensive it is, but correct. You look at the map, and you see that it's how it is. Although we border also on China which is neither our enemy nor our vassal. Although India is not that far from us, too. But the rest of our neighbours... So why do I revolt and why do I not agree with the Mr. Kennan's utterance? And I know why. Because who says that? Who is Kennan, remind me please? He's an American!

    To talk about neighbours, is easy to Americans. They, somehow, almost don't have neighbours. But if for Russia all the neighbours are either enemies or vassals, for America only continuous stretch of neighbours exists in the world. And if some country and its inhabitants don't count themselves neither enemies nor vassals in respect of America, America count every country either one or the other. It's only that America doesn't go into details neither of national nor religious nor cultural peculiarities. America and Americans somehow distinctly don't want to know anything about anyone except themselves. And they can't even imagine that completely different consciousness and opinion could exist. What is Mr. Kennan's sentence about? About something what he sees in the mirror. He only thinks it's not his own reflection in it.

    But allow me to say what I think about us and our neighbours. I'll say that not from the State of Russia's position, but from my own, purely private one. I was born and grew up in Russia. Or, I should rather say, in the Soviet Union. And now, I live in the Russia which Mr. Kennan is talking about. I was born in the Soviet Union, and all those, now neighbouring, countries enter into my geographical conception of Homeland. And that means all this is a territory of love. And the majority of people who live in Russia feel the same. Russian people, unlike Mr. Kennan, know geography, they know different national cultures, they have friends, relatives and colleagues in the neighbouring countries. Unlike Mr. Kennan, they take to heart every conflict situation which happens between Russia and its neighbours. There are many of such situations, and everything is very complicated.

    If we go deep into Mr. Kennan's sentence, Russia only has enemies. Because any vassal is always a potencial enemy. Vassals don't love their master, it's impossible. From this point of view America is in a much worse condition. Who loves America? Tell me!

    I was in Tbilisi two weeks before the South-Ossetian conflict began. I stayed at "Sheraton" hotel. In Tbilisi, it's one of the best and most expensive. The hotel was not full. Only few tourists and very, very many Amercian military specialist lived in it. Judging by their stripes, they were airmen and missile specialists. These American soldiers evidently enjoyed staying at a good inn. They obviously were not used to such good conditions and to chic hotels. But at that, they always wore the field dress, without finding it necessary to put on the full one. They were wrinkled, unbuttoned, free-and-easy. They were indifferent about the beautiful, ancient city Tbilisi. They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant worn in accordance with the evening time and the restaurant's level. They were speaking loudly, laughing boisterously and even didn't suppose that someone could understand what they were talking about. They regarded all the people who surrounded them as absent in their life. They, obviously, didn't care about Georgia. They conduct themselves in the same way at any US military base. You think Georgians treated those soldiers with sympathy? No! But me, and my friends, Georgians were very glad to see. The purpose of my visit was discussing our mutual theatrical plans, and also the outlook for opening of Russian Book's Shop in Tbilisi. We went to the restoring Georgian Penmen's House where was and will be a literary museum. In this building, Griboyedov and Pushkin formerly were reading their works. We agreed then that I will come again and read my new stories there and present my manuscripts to the museum.

    We have talked a lot those days, were remembering and quoting our favourite Georgian and Russian films which people in our countries know by heart. I make many trips in Ukraine, in the Baltic states, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Georgia, Armenia, with my performances. I go not to enemies and not to vassals.

    How easy to say that about Russia! How easy, in general, to say such things about others! And how easy to draw borders! I recall, once in Switzerland, a journalist at the press conference asked me if I count myself an European. I replied, "There is no sense to answer this question since one who asks me doesn't count me an European." I know, what I'm writing now, will read people in Germany. I'd like to ask a question, a rhetorical one: perhaps in Europe all have good-neighbour relations with each other? What, Frenchs love Germans, and vice versa? What, all adore Britons? What, Belgians dote upon the Dutch? Even life in one house, if there are several flats in it, is always not simple. Completely unclouded and untroubled relations between neighbours are impossible. The best and most comfortable thing is living without neighbours. In many respects, that's how America tends to live.
    I spent so much time speaking on the phone on the most hot days of the Georgian-South Ossetian conflict. My Georgian friends and I, we were talking so much, and if we were even not be able to come to an agreement, we were assuring each other of love and friendship. In the same way I was talking with my Ukrainian friends who were terribly agitated by the Caucasian developments. We talked much and we keep talking. That's not how it could be between enemies or vassals.

    I was watching eagerly the newscasts. At one moment I was watching our mass media, at another CNN, at another BBC. The pictures were alike both here and there. The comments were diametrically different. Nobody touched on the truth which always is in the middle. It's us who's in the middle. We are who now lives in this world. We always are in the middle.

    Do you know what makes me glad about the manner in which Russian television channels presented information? And it differs very much from the way how they showed the Chechen campaign or reports about terrorist acts. In the reports from the South Ossetia were few or almost were not shown Georgian soldiers – neither captive, nor killed nor fighting. At that, European and American channels showed many of Russian soldiers. In Russia, a decision must have been made - not to create a scary, enemy image of a Georgian. It's a very good sign. And I have never been Putin's worshipper, have never been a worshipper of his politic style, but what he said in his interview to CNN, that he takes the military operations between the Russian and the Georgian armies as a civil war - this is very important. That's not what people usually say about enemies or vassals.

    To Americans, who mix up the name 'Grusia' with the name of their state Georgia, it never occurred how much hard people in Russia took this conflict. And how much hard Georgians take it. In july, I was talking to a very famous Georgian writer, his name doesn't matter. He's old and wise. He was talking about Saakashvili then, evidently trying to apologize for the president of his country. He said, "You see, Zhenya, Saakashvili is a very ill-mannered man. But you should understand Georgians. We are small and proud. And we want people to talk about us, to know about us. Saakashvili made things in such a way that everyone is talking about us. Even if in a bad manner, but every day." And these words explain much. But explain only to the people who knows Georgia and loves it, in other words to us who lives in Russia. But those who don't know and don't understand this marvellous country's peculiarities are indifferent about that. I will never believe in sincerity of Americans' care about Georgia. I won't believe in sincerity of their slogans and appeals for defence of democracy, I won't believe that Americans don't see and don't understand Mikhail Saakashvili's essence. And I won't believe that Americans count him and Georgia a friend. For them, Georgia is not an enemy or a vassal, but just a card or a chip in their game. A chip in which you don't feel living people, history, long-standing human relations.

    So virtually, Mr. Kennan said a thing which is hard to dispute. Especially if watch CNN. I can repeat his words, but addressing America. It's only that I won't be quoted. That’s the whole difference.

    Yevgeni Grishkovetz, a Russian writer.

    America and Americans somehow distinctly don't want to know anything about anyone except themselves.


    That is stupid.

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    fortheether, I don't mean to discuss the article, there's a special forum and the special thread for that. That's not my article anyway. If the sentence is incorrect (from the English language's point of view) could you please correct it? Thanks.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  4. #4
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    The peoples state of New Jersey
    Posts
    1,137
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    fortheether, I don't mean to discuss the article, there's a special forum and the special thread for that. That's not my article anyway. If the sentence is incorrect (from the English language's point of view) could you please correct it? Thanks.
    In American English when you say:

    I understand that the text is very long, but maybe someone could find time to correct some of my mistakes, or maybe to correct the text in parts. Please.

    Specifically "correct some of my mistakes" - it makes it sound like you wrote the article. The article has so much British English in it that I will hope someone from the other side of the pond will work with you on it.

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    it sound like you wrote the article
    But I'm not Yevgeni Grishkovetz!

    By the way, I dont think the article is against Americans, it's against the American politics. And the sentence "America and Americans don't want to know anything about anyone except themselves" is about American politicans.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  6. #6
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    341
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian confli

    Here's the first part. Corrections and additions are red. Most of the changes were for style. "Utterance" is a word that is not used very often outside of some very special contexts. You might use it as a synonym for "statement" or "speech" or "sentence" if you just want to use a different word, but it isn't a good word to use regularly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Edit: That's my translation of the article, not my article.

    I understand that the text is very long, but maybe someone could find time to correct some of my mistakes, or maybe to correct the text in parts. Please.

    ---

    I've read George Kennan's statement which says that Russia's neighbours are either vassals or enemies, and I was rolling this maxim around in my mind again and again. What is it about this statement that makes me indignant and why do I want so much to say something against it? At first sight everything is correct. Offensive, but correct. You look at the map, and you see that that's how it is, although we border also on China which is neither our enemy nor our vassal. Also India is not that far from us (deleted "too"). But the rest of our neighbours... So why do I revolt and why do I not agree with the Mr. Kennan's statement? (deleted "and") I know why. Because of who said it. Who is Mr. Kennan, remind me please? He's an American!

    Talking about neighbours (no comma) is easy for Americans. Somehow they almost don't have neighbours. But if for Russia all (deleted "the") neighbours are either enemies or vassals, for America the whole world is just a continuous stretch of neighbours. (deleted "And") If some country and its inhabitants don't count themselves as either enemies or vassals with respect to America, America counts every country either one or the other. It's only that America doesn't go into the details (deleted "neither") of national or religious or cultural peculiarities. America and Americans somehow distinctly don't want to know anything about anyone except themselves. And they can't even imagine that a completely different consciousness and opinion could exist. What is Mr. Kennan's sentence about? About something what he sees in the mirror. He only thinks it's not his own reflection in it.

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Thanks, paulb, so much. You are very kind

    I thought "utterance" is a wrong word, but I was not sure.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  8. #8
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    341
    Rep Power
    9
    You probably already know this, but "neighbour" is Br spelling and "neighbor" is Am. If you wanted this to go primarily to an American audience you should change it.

    Next part:


    But allow me to say what I think about us and our neighbours. I'll say it not as the State of Russia's position, but merely my own, purely private one. I was born and grew up in Russia. Or, I should rather say, in the Soviet Union. And now (no comma) I live in the Russia which Mr. Kennan is talking about. I was born in the Soviet Union, and all those, now neighbouring, countries enter into my geographical conception of "homeland". And that means this is all a territory of love. (deleted "and") The majority of people who live in Russia feel the same. Russian people, unlike Mr. Kennan, know geography, they know different national cultures, and they have friends, relatives and colleagues in the neighbouring countries. Unlike Mr. Kennan, they take to heart every conflict situation which happens between Russia and its neighbours. There are many (deleted "of") such situations, and everything is very complicated.

    If we look deeply into Mr. Kennan's sentence, Russia only has enemies. Because any vassal is always a potential enemy. Vassals don't love their master -- it's impossible. From this point of view America is in a much worse condition. Who loves America? Tell me!

  9. #9
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    The peoples state of New Jersey
    Posts
    1,137
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    it sound like you wrote the article
    But I'm not Yevgeni Grishkovetz!

    By the way, I dont think the article is against Americans, it's against the American politics. And the sentence "America and Americans don't want to know anything about anyone except themselves" is about American politicans.
    Maybe in the Russian text the sentence is about only politicians. In American English the sentence is clearly about all Americans, not just politicians.

  10. #10
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by fortheether
    Maybe in the Russian text the sentence is about only politicians. In American English the sentence is clearly about all Americans, not just politicians.
    Well, you know, if about 50% of Americans support McCain who hates Russia, after all it means something, doesn't it?..
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  11. #11
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    16
    Next couple ¶¶:

    But let me say what I think about us and our neighbours. I'll talk not from the State of Russia's position, but from my own, purely private position. I was born and raised in Russia. Or, I should say, in the Soviet Union. Now I live in the Russia which Mr. Kennan is talking about. I was born in the Soviet Union, and all those, now neighbouring, countries enter into my geographical conception of Homeland. That means all this is a territory of love. The majority of people who live in Russia feel the same. Russian people, unlike Mr. Kennan, know geography, they know different national cultures, they have friends, relatives and colleagues in the neighbouring countries. Unlike Mr. Kennan, they take to heart every conflict situation which happens between Russia and its neighbours. There are many such situations, and everything is very complicated.

    If we go deep into Mr. Kennan's thought, Russia only has enemies. Because any vassal is always a potential enemy. Vassals don't love their master, it's impossible. From this point of view America is in a much worse condition. Who loves America? Tell me!

    I was in Tbilisi two weeks before the South Ossetian conflict began. I stayed at the Sheraton Hotel. It's one of the best and most expensive in Tblisi. The hotel was not full. Only a few tourists and very, very many Amercian military specialists were staying there. Judging by their stripes, they were airmen and missile specialists. These American soldiers evidently enjoyed staying at a good inn. They obviously were not used to such good conditions and to chic hotels. Nevertheless, they always wore their field uniforms, without finding it necessary to put on their dress uniforms. They were wrinkled, unbuttoned, free-and-easy. They were indifferent about the beautiful, ancient city Tbilisi. They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant [??? Don't understand this: worn in accordance with the evening time and the restaurant's level]. They were speaking loudly, laughing boisterously and did not even consider that anyone could understand what they were talking about. They regarded all the people who surrounded them as invisible. They obviously didn't care about Georgia. They conduct themselves the same way at any US military base. You think Georgians treated those soldiers with sympathy? No! But me, and my friends, Georgians were very glad to see. The purpose of my visit was to discuss our mutual theatrical plans, and also the outlook for opening a Russian bookstore in Tbilisi. We went to the restored Georgian Writers' House, which houses a literary museum. In this building Griboyedov and Pushkin used to read their works. We agreed then that I would return and read my new stories there and present my manuscripts to the museum.

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Thanks, chaika, and paulb once again.

    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant [??? Don't understand this: worn in accordance with the evening time and the restaurant's level].
    people wore an elegant dress in accordance with...
    people were worn in a way in accordance with...
    people were well-dressed as the restaurant's level required...

    P.S. Damn, it seems it should be "dressed", not "worn"!
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  13. #13
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    The peoples state of New Jersey
    Posts
    1,137
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Quote Originally Posted by fortheether
    Maybe in the Russian text the sentence is about only politicians. In American English the sentence is clearly about all Americans, not just politicians.
    Well, you know, if about 50% of Americans support McCain who hates Russia, after all it means something, doesn't it?..

    I don't get it but it's OK.

  14. #14
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    341
    Rep Power
    9
    I'm getting lazy, so I'll just add * where I've changed someting.

    We * talked a lot *in those days, *remembering and quoting our favourite Georgian and Russian films which people in our countries know by heart. I *have made many trips *to Ukraine, *to the Baltic states, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Georgia, Armenia, with my performances. I go not to enemies and not to vassals. (You can use "in" with "travel", but not with making/taking trips)

    *It's so easy to talk about Russia! *It is easy, in general, to say such things about others! And it is easy to draw borders! I recall *one occasion in Switzerland *when a journalist at *a press conference asked me if I *consider myself *a European. I replied, "*It doesn't make much sense for me to answer this question since *anyone who asks me doesn't *consider me *a European." I know *that what I'm writing now * will *be read *by people in Germany. I'd like to ask a question*-- a rhetorical one: *do the people of Europe all have *good neighbourly relations with each other? Do *the French love Germans, and vice versa? *Do they all adore Britons? *Do Belgians dote upon the Dutch? Even life in one house, if there are several flats in it, is *not always simple. Completely unclouded and untroubled relations between neighbours are impossible. The best and most comfortable thing is living without neighbours. In many respects, that's how America tends to live.
    *I've spent * much time *on the phone *during the hottest days of the Georgian-South Ossetian conflict. My Georgian friends and I* were speaking constantly, and even if we were unable to come to *any agreement, we *were able to assure each other of love and friendship. (In this sentence, if the Ukrainians are still upset, the verbs should be in the perfect tense: have been talking, have been terribly agitated) In the same way I was talking with my Ukrainian friends who were terribly agitated by the Caucasian developments. We talked much and we keep talking. That's not how it *would be between enemies or vassals.

  15. #15
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    226
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian confli

    Lots of archaic or at least awkward sounding words, some syntactical and stylistic mistakes. Good effort...but I'd say you're pretty far down the river from being a professional translator. If I find the time I'll come back later and edit it.
    исправьте мои ошибки :P

  16. #16
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    305
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian confli

    Picking up where paulb left off, here are some suggested corrections, alternative or optional words, and moved words:
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    How easy it is to say that about Russia! How easy, in general, to say such things about others! And how easy to draw borders! I recall, once in Switzerland, a journalist at a press conference asked me if I count/consider myself to be a European. I replied, "There is no sense in answering this question since the one who asked me doesn't count/consider me to be a European." I know what I'm writing now will be read by people in Germany. I'd like to ask a question, a rhetorical one: perhaps in Europe do all countries have good-neighbour relations/relationships with each other? What, do the French love the Germans, and vice versa? What, do all/does everybody adore the Britons/British? What, do Belgians dote upon the Dutch? Even life in one house, if there are several flats in it, is not always simple. Completely unclouded/clear and untroubled/smooth relations between neighbours are impossible. The best and most comfortable thing is living without neighbours. In many respects, that's how America tends to live.
    I spent so much time speaking on the phone during the most heated days of the Georgian-South Ossetian conflict. My Georgian friends and I, we were talking so much, and if we were even not be able to come to an agreement, we were assuring each other of love and friendship. In the same way I was talking with my Ukrainian friends who were terribly agitated by the Caucasian developments/by developments in the Caucuses. We talked very much and we kept talking. That's not how it should be between enemies or vassals.

    I was eagerly watching the newscasts. At one moment I was watching our mass media, at another CNN, at another the BBC. The pictures were alike both here and there. The comments were diametrically different. Nobody touched on the truth which is always in the middle. It's us who are in the middle. We who now live in this world are always in the middle.

    Do you know what makes me glad about the manner in which Russian television channels presented information/presented the news? And it differs very much from the way that they showed the Chechen campaign or reports about terrorist acts. In the reports from South Ossetia there were few or almost no Georgian soldiers shown – neither captive/captured, nor killed nor fighting. At that,/But European and American channels showed many of the Russian soldiers. In Russia, a decision must have been made - not to create a scary, enemy image of a Georgian/of Georgians. It's a very good sign. And I have never been Putin's worshiper/admirer, have never been a worshiper/supporter of his political style, but what he said in his interview on CNN, that he takes/considers the military operations between the Russian and the Georgian armies as a civil war - is very important. That's not what people usually say about enemies or vassals.

    To Americans, who mix up the name 'Grusia' (I don't know what this word means) with the name of their state of Georgia, it never occurred to them how very hard the people in Russia took this conflict. And how very hard Georgians take it. In July, I was talking to a very famous Georgian writer, his name doesn't matter. He's old and wise. He was talking about Saakashvili then, evidently trying to apologize for the President of his country. He said, "You see, Zhenya, Saakashvili is a very ill-mannered man. But you should understand Georgians. We are small and proud. And we want people to talk about us, to know about us. Saakashvili made things in such a way that everyone is talking about us, even if in a bad manner, but every day." And these words explain much. But they explain only to the people who know Georgia and love it, in other words to us who live in Russia. But those who don't know and don't understand this marvellous country's peculiarities are indifferent about that. I will never believe in the sincerity of Americans who care about Georgia. I won't believe in the sincerity of their slogans and appeals for the defence/defense of democracy. I won't believe that Americans don't see and don't understand Mikhail Saakashvili's essence. And I won't believe that Americans count him and Georgia as friends. For them, Georgia is not an enemy or a vassal, but just a card or a chip in their game. A chip in which you don't feel/know/understand living people, history, and long-standing human relations.

    So virtually, Mr. Kennan said something which is hard to dispute, especially if you watch CNN. I can repeat his words, but in addressing America I think that I won't be quoted. That’s the whole difference.

    Yevgeni Grishkovetz, a Russian writer.

  17. #17
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian confli

    Guys, everyone of you, thank you SO much, you've really improved my English.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Watts
    'Grusia' (I don't know what this word means)
    It means "Georgia", how we pronounce this name. We pronounce it: groo-zeeh-yah.

    I can repeat his words, but in addressing America I think that I won't be quoted.
    The sense of the original sentence was: "I can repeat these words, direct them to America. I only don't think I'll be quoted."

    And also, guys, I'd appreciate if someone tells me what should be the correct sentence for:
    They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant worn in accordance with the evening time and the restaurant's level.
    Should I simply put "dressed" instead of "worn"?
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  18. #18
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    305
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Yevgeni Grishkovetz's article about the Caucasian confli

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    The sense of the original sentence was: "I can repeat these words, direct them to America. I only don't think I'll be quoted."
    Suggested corrections, alternative or optional and moved words : "I can repeat these words, direct them to America/publish them in America, only I don't think I'll be quoted."
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    And also, guys, I'd appreciate if someone tells me what should be the correct sentence for:
    They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant worn in accordance with the evening time and the restaurant's level.
    Should I simply put "dressed" instead of "worn"?
    Yes "dressed" is better, but "worn" can be changed to "wear" or "wearing" as follows: They didn't care that people came to the hotel restaurant dressed in evening wear/attire/. . . to the hotel restaurant wearing evening clothes in accordance with/fitting the restaurant's social level/style.

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19
    Thanks again, Ken.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: September 11th, 2009, 02:12 PM
  2. Replies: 55
    Last Post: December 24th, 2008, 09:17 AM
  3. Article in HELLO
    By SoeurSourire in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: October 22nd, 2007, 07:28 AM
  4. Israel-Lebanon conflict
    By SummerKiss in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 223
    Last Post: August 18th, 2006, 06:25 AM
  5. Caucasian
    By Pravit in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: December 16th, 2004, 06:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary