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Thread: Beginner Books?

  1. #1
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    Beginner Books?

    What is the absolute best book for beginners? Does it come with audio? And how much is it?

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    Best book

    Is supposedly the Penguin New russian course, no audio.

    Primsleur is audio approach only, and works for some. Not too well for me.

    There is also russian courseware available from Princeton university, including audio.

  3. #3
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    Thank you povlhp!

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    Princeton

    http://www.princeton.edu/russian/SLA101/

    Here's the link to a (the?) Princeton course.

    I hated the grammar explanations. The only thing I use this for is the different vocab and the audio.

    ~dUcK!

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    this "Penguin" something course...what does it consist of? I have heard great reviews of it, and am thinking of purchasing it. I have a beginner's book, but it doesn't show me anything about how words are stressed, and since it's different in all russian words, i need it marked as i read it to better pronounce it. Thanks if you have any info.
    letet na lunu

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    Penguins

    Yeah everyone here seems to think it's a super great book. I for one can't find it anywhere. I wish one of the many local libraries had a copy so I wouldn't have to buy it. >_< Anyhow if you go on amazon and search for The New Penguin Russian Course you'll find it and they have sample pages...not many...but they give you the contents and the first couple pages of the alphabet chapter. It seems like a worthwhile book to me...

    ~dUcK!

    --It's also really cheap o_o

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    Beginners Books


    I haven't heard of the book your talking about, but I am trying to learn with the "Teach Yourself Beginner's Russian". Unfortuneatly it does not come with
    audio tapes & am in BIG need to hear how it is suppose to sound & if i'm anywhere near sounding right. HHEELLPP MEEEEEE Please someone

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    hm...raindancer, i have the same ty book and mine does come with audio. ?hm
    letet na lunu

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    those tricky tys

    Yeah, they sell them just as books AND as whole sets with CDs. It's kinda fishy haha. My first ty book was for Japanese and I was so distressed to see that it had cues for audio tapes I didn't have. o_o

    ~dUcK!

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    speaking of books, eh there's a GREAT dictionary if you're really into studying...it gives a great pronunciation guide and info on tenses, verbs and adjectives...and it's 1085 pages of material.
    Be warned, tho, it's expensive. But nonetheless, it's helped a lot! Can be found at Borders, B&N, etc...i got this one at a discount BooksAMillion store.
    English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary, Kenneth Katzner. The ISBN is 0-471-01707-8 if that helps any.
    With almost every word, there's a sentence explaining how it is used in writing or speech, some idioms, etc...

    Highly recommended (by me).
    letet na lunu

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    katzner

    yay

    That's the dictionary I have! I also LOVE it!! ^_^

    That makes two ^_~

    ~dUcK!

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    yes, i love it...one thing, tho... i can't turn a page and ask the dictionary how to pronounce it!! lol, but if you know of anything online that you can hear and read at the same time, let me know..thnxamllion

    ~sUpernova!
    letet na lunu

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    stress marks!

    Dictionaries generally have the stress accented. That makes it pretty easy to know how to pronounce it if you know the rules...

    ~dUcK!

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    Греческий Язык

    true, true..btw, do you happen to know if it would be a good idea for me to learn greek to help me learn russian?

    Η ελληνική γλώσσα (Αγαπώ BABELFISH!)
    Греческий язык (я обожаю BABELFISH!)

    oh, how i would love a greek-russian-english dictionary!!! but it would confuse me terribly

    spasibo!
    letet na lunu

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    greek o_O

    I don't know much about Greek, but if you really want to be learning Russian, you should study Russian right? heh. Learning Greek to help you learn Russian would be something like learning Latin to help you learn French...ne?

    ~dUcK!

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    Learning Greek to help you learn Russian would be akin to learning Russian to help you learn English. They are both Indo-European languages, but are otherwise unrelated.

    As for the Penguin Russian Course, it is not that amazing of a book. You will still need to sit down, memorize grammar rules and vocabulary, and work through exercises, like with any other book. It offers grammar with vocabulary, dialogues, exercises, and reading selections. The TY books differ in their more tourist-oriented approach - they seem to be broken up into units that deal with getting around the airport, reserving a hotel room, and so on. Besides that, they seem not to be as comprehensive or give as good explanations as the PRC. I would also recommend Introductory Russian Grammar by Stilman & Harkins, you might be able to find it somewhere that sells old college textbooks. Another common one seen at stores is Russian for Beginners by Duff and Makaroff, which is rather boring and quick-paced, although in my opinion it's better than the TY books.

    Kenneth Katzner's dictionary is a great choice, but to add to your list, you may want to pick up Nicholas J. Brown's Learner's Dictionary, which has around 15,000 words arranged by frequency of use. I suppose it would be good if you like memorizing long lists of vocabulary(if not, then don't bother). If you use the computer a lot, I would recommend picking up Lingvo too - and unless you want to translate between German, French, Italian, and Spanish in addition to Russian and English, you can just stick to the standard Russian-English-Russian version that costs only around $30, I believe.

    The best way to go about things, of course, would be to get into a class or private tutor. I don't know how well the private tutors work, though, as some of them(from what I've heard, I've never had one) seem to move you along at an incredibly slow pace. Also, I'd imagine many of them don't actually have any teaching experience and are simply ordinary people looking to make some money on the side(how good of an English teacher would you be if you moved to Russia?). Of course, the same might be said of a class at your local university or community college, so try to learn something about the class first. One of the guys who took the Russian courses while we still had them said that after a semester the only thing taught to him was the alphabet(through the revolutionary method of holding up a sign with the letter on it and repeating the letter aloud).

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    Kenneth Katzner

    Hmmmm I too am looking for a Russian dictionary. This Ken Katzner dictionary looks good, however it is American/English based and not English/English therefore am a little standoffish about than as American is not true english.
    Развязная обезьяна

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    I assume you are concerned with the English portion of the dictionary because you are a Russian learning English. In that case, it would be a better idea to buy a Russian/English dictionary written for Russians. Although I might be wrong, the Kenneth Katzner dictionary is written for English-speakers trying to learn Russian.

    (Written) American English does not differ that much from British English anyway. And if you plan on using it with Americans or in the US, it's certainly "true" English.

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    What I mean is.......Pravit....



    Yes I agree written American English is very similar with the odd spelling like Check/Cheque, Potato/Potatoe, Color/Colour (which doesn't often help with spell check on Microsoft Word.)

    Example: "Aluminium" Americans stress the 'LU' and the English stress the 'MIN'. Why does every single English speaking country stress the 'MIN' part of this word except America?

    If Semi "i as in eye" is the proper way to pronounce the word then Why is Demi Moore's name pron "I as in Eve"

    My concerns being it an American made dictionary. What is the stress's in the Russian words like? Are they true?

    I could go on about it but I will leave it at that.
    Развязная обезьяна

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    Hold on, so you're an English-speaker trying to learn Russian? In that case, why do you care which English is in the dictionary? One of the dictionaries I use is the Oxford Russian Dictionary, which is filled with various "English" English words, yet it hasn't impeded my learning of Russian. Speaking as an American myself, I find it a little strange that you have concerns about the stress in Russian words because it's an American-made dictionary. What, did you think they'd publish a dictionary with incorrect stress as pronounced by Americans? Although I'm ashamed by other Americans sometimes, we're not such idiots that you can't trust our reference material. Should I begin nitpicking at the horrendous misuses of the English language I've found in your posts, written by a speaker of proper "English" English?

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