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Thread: Russian 'shaun'?

  1. #1
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    Russian 'shaun'?

    Just wondering, whats the russian for 'shaun'. Ive been using 'Ivan' thus far; but im not sure if thats correct.

    Also, my dads name is Chris. Does that make my patronymic 'Krisovich'?

  2. #2
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    I think that Крис and Шон have no pairs in Russian. They are just nice Scottish/Irish names.
    Я так думаю.

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    Also, you don't have a patronymic, however sad and left-out that might make you feel. If you ever go to Russia, you'll just be known as "Шон Миддл-Нейм Субмарино." Assume your name was John Andrew Smith, you'd just be: "Джон Андруй Смит" or something like that. Of course, you could always buy fake documents, but I wouldn't advise that -- because as "Goldeneye" reminds us, the penalty for treason in Russia is still death! Mwahahaha.
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

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    Теперь у нас есть Эйтор Клавдиевич и Шон Крисович.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    Теперь у нас есть Эйтор Клавдиевич и Шон Крисович.
    и Степан Давидович...
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

  6. #6
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    Apart from the others, your name sounds ear-caressing to every native Russian.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    Apart from the others, your name sounds ear-caressing to every native Russian.
    Too bad that's not what they put on my visa...

    Стивен Майкль...
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

  8. #8
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    They always do some pervertion.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    They always do some pervertion.
    My teacher insisted on calling me Дима, and once the militia stopped me (they were randomly stopping lots of teenagers asking for draft papers), and so he was looking at my passport when my teacher yelled, "Дима, куда пропал!?" Then when I said back, "Щас!", the militia officer thought my passport was a fake and started saying things I didn't understand. My teacher came to bail me out though. (I only found out he thought it was fake later from my teacher explaining).
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

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    Dutch comfort! Was there a sensible reason to call you this way?
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    Dutch comfort! Was there a sensible reason to call you this way?
    He calls all students by unrelated Russian names. I was called Дима and another in my class was called Дмитрий. One girl's real name was Anastasia and she went by Светлана.
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

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    I just rememberd that there is some teaching method when people get different names in the language they learn to feel convenient and relaxed.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    Chris is short for Christopher and is not a Scottish/Irish name.

    It also exists in French as Christophe (sp?)

    Shaun/Sean/Shawn is the Irish form of John, which is the English form of Иван (Ivan).
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
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    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    Chris is short for Christopher and is not a Scottish/Irish name.

    It also exists in French as Christophe (sp?) sp = perfectly correct
    Could also be Christian, though.

    I'm not sure whether there are any links between "Christopher" and "Christian"?
    Ой, голова у меня кружится |-P ...... and my brain hurts too....

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    Ah so it was Christopher...(стало быть, Христофор Банифатьевич)
    Well, anyway generally I'm against of the name adaptation.
    Of course it's a matter of ones taste, but I believe we should not replace our names by similar foreign names. At least not when it's not nessesary. We redo the names enough just trying to say them in the best way for our tongues. After one replaced his name he could wish translate his second name - people did that throughout the history a great many times. In the late Middle Ages and later such influenses (like Latin soundings) turned usual German Fleischer into Fleischius when the butcher wanted to became a surger. Everyone wished to redo their names and second names and make them sound Latin-like. Or literally translated it in Latin and the result was stupid.

    We can go onwards and do like in Latvia and Ukraine where such things happen. People suffer because their names and second names are changed mercylessly. I believe that's wrong.

    In doing so we would have such names as Ефрем Чосер (Geoffrey Chaucer), Иван Мильтон (John Milton) and Яна Остен (Jane Austen) and, in turn, John Turgenev and Anthony Chehov.
    Я так думаю.

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    But what about when the two names are very close...?

    For example, we call Царь Николай - Tsar Nicholas. It's not a significant difference.
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

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    Agree. When it is the matter of one letter. Besides, again, it's a matter of choise and taste and ones wish. But most of the names are incomparably different and have no names close by meaning or sound.
    But compare John (Джон) and Ivan (Иван), which turns into Айвэн when it's tranformed back in English.

    Waht would we do with Иван Бах?
    Я так думаю.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leof
    Ah so it was Christopher...(стало быть, Христофор Банифатьевич)

    We can go onwards and do like in Latvia and Ukraine where such things happen. People suffer because their names and second names are changed mercylessly. I believe that's wrong.

    In doing so we would have such names as Ефрем Чосер (Geoffrey Chaucer), Иван Мильтон (John Milton) and Яна Остен (Jane Austen) and, in turn, John Turgenev and Antony Chehov.
    Anthony (but the th is pronounced as T) is the most common spelling.
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