Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: My names

  1. #1
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Литва, Europe!
    Posts
    92
    Rep Power
    9

    My names

    So I am from Lithuania, however my family are of Ukrainian and Russian origin so therefore are my names Russian, but in Lithuania we try to change everything to fit Lithuanian ways :P

    My name was
    Вадим Владимирович Козловский

    but now
    Vadim Vladimirovič Kozlovskis

    I just thought to post this as I think maybe for someone here it will be interesting!

    In Lithuania we try to change everything! :P

  2. #2
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Литва, Europe!
    Posts
    92
    Rep Power
    9
    But nobody calls me by Vadim, but my

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    Your surname sounds Polish.
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  4. #4
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Russia
    Posts
    257
    Rep Power
    10
    Bushs, Putins - good names too
    Единственное, что люди любят давать бесплатно - это советы.

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    Your surname sounds Polish.
    There used to be a Lithuanian and Polish commonwealth a few hundred years ago, so that's not entirely unlikely. So if his forebearers wanted to adjust to the Lithuanian version, they may have taken a more localized version of Kozlov, which could in fact have been a Polish name. Which you probably already knew -- and were probably just talking out loud.
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    Kozlowski is a Polish name.

    Ski is a Slavic ending. Lithuanian is not Slavic.

    Russian names don't tend to end in -ski. The ones that do are often of Polish origin. Lots, maybe most POlish names end in -Ski, and also in neighoubring Belarus' and Ukraine.

    He said his parents came from Russia/Ukraine.
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Moscow,50 feet above the ground
    Posts
    4,106
    Rep Power
    13
    Wait. Козловский is Kozlovskiy and Kozlovski is Козловски. Thus the first one is russian the second - Polish. I believe Kozlovski in this case was Russian second name. or what??
    Я так думаю.

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    Kozlowski is a Polish name.

    Ski is a Slavic ending. Lithuanian is not Slavic.

    Russian names don't tend to end in -ski. The ones that do are often of Polish origin. Lots, maybe most POlish names end in -Ski, and also in neighoubring Belarus' and Ukraine.

    He said his parents came from Russia/Ukraine.
    No, no, I understand that. My conjecture was simply that at some point there was a large Polish community in Lithuania, and it followed that such a common name as Kozlovski would be present there -- a Russian who wanted to sound more localized may adopt that variant, since it was from a similar, Slavic language in a place where such a name was normal. That was all. Consider a scenario in which a person in what was then the Louisiana territory in the US would have been named de la Francais, but adopted de la Francia in order to be more "localized" (in this case, to appeal to the Spanish speaking Mexican authorities in Texas). He didn't adopt Frank/Frankman/Frankwhatever. Again, maybe I'm completely off base, but that was just a theory...
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

  9. #9
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Leof
    Wait. Козловский is Kozlovskiy and Kozlovski is Козловски. Thus the first one is russian the second - Polish. I believe Kozlovski in this case was Russian second name. or what??
    No, in English we usually write -ский and just -sky or -ski
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  10. #10
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Moscow,50 feet above the ground
    Posts
    4,106
    Rep Power
    13
    then tell me one thing - do the Polish family names end with ский or ски

    tnx KV!
    Я так думаю.

  11. #11
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: My names

    Quote Originally Posted by ivanushki
    In Lithuania we try to change everything! :P
    The same is in Ukraine.
    Apparently somebody in the government cosiders it's funny to translate russian last names into Ukrainian regardless of people's will. Thus Скворцов according to his new passport becomes Шпаков, etc. It's humiliating. Thanks God my last name can't be translated since nobody knows what it means.

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sunnyvale, Cali
    Posts
    5,771
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Leof
    then tell me one thing - do the Polish family names end with ский or ски
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

  13. #13
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Литва, Europe!
    Posts
    92
    Rep Power
    9
    Well I think it must be russian, unless there is polish heritage somewhere but I have never ever been told of this! By the way we write it Kozlovskis only because we lived in Lithuania, originally it would be and still is by my family there written Kozlovskiy. My father was from Cheljabinsk and mother's family were from Kyiv.

    My mother's name is Naталья Оставівна Золотова. Zolotova to me is russian I think but I have no clue about her origins to be honest.

  14. #14
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    In Polish names end in

    -ski

    See in Russian and Belarussian the standard endings for adjectives are long, like doubled:

    новый
    новая
    новое
    новые

    In Ukrainian you can write them long, but the standard form is short, but the long form is retained in the masculine:

    новий
    нова
    нове
    нові

    In the other slavonic languages they have short endings:

    E.g. in Serbian, the adjective Serbian is Српски, Српска

    In Polish the names end in
    -ski or -ska (m/f).

    Thus Mr. Kaczyński is married to Mrs. Kaczyńska.

    But when Polish names are transliterated into Russian, they Russify them to:

    Качиньский , Качинськая. If you see something written about the Polish president, Lech Kaczyński, in a Russian newspaper they'll put -ский at the end even though in Polish it ends -ski. (Лех Качиньский)

    This means the names will decline:

    Дом Качиньского - Mr. Kaczyński's house

    Of course in Polish the name would decline in the same way:

    Dom Kaczyńskego
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by ivanushki
    Well I think it must be russian, unless there is polish heritage somewhere but I have never ever been told of this! By the way we write it Kozlovskis only because we lived in Lithuania, originally it would be and still is by my family there written Kozlovskiy. My father was from Cheljabinsk and mother's family were from Kyiv.

    My mother's name is Naталья Оставівна Золотова. Zolotova to me is russian I think but I have no clue about her origins to be honest.
    -ов(а) is a Russian ending for a name. Although there are lots of people in Ukraine with such names, they are not Ukrainian in origin.
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  16. #16
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nove Zamky, Slovakia
    Posts
    131
    Rep Power
    9
    I can say, that in Slovakia we have many different endings of surnames, but only the females surnames have to end in this form: [b]-ov
    Я ЕСТЬ потому что мы ЕСТЬ. Чтобы были МЫ -- ЕСТЬ Я.
    ПРОЛЕТАРИИ ВСЕХ СТРАН, СОЕДИНЯЙТЕСЬ!

  17. #17
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Moscow,50 feet above the ground
    Posts
    4,106
    Rep Power
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    ...
    thank you for explaining so widely - now I understood about the second names
    Я так думаю.

  18. #18
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mowcow, Russia
    Posts
    1,957
    Rep Power
    12
    talking of the long (full) and short forms, the Russian long forms have appeared later than common-slavic short forms. IIRC, "long" forms were originally a combination of an adjective and a pronoun.

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Seventh
    Posts
    4,113
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by translations.nm.ru
    talking of the long (full) and short forms, the Russian long forms have appeared later than common-slavic short forms. IIRC, "long" forms were originally a combination of an adjective and a pronoun.
    Thanks. I thought as much since only Russian and Belarussian have them, so it was likely they developed later.

    In Ukrainian they tend to be only found in archaic texts or in poetry and sounds (to aid rhyming).

    Interestingly it is the other way round when it comes to мною тобою etc. (long form instrumental endings) In Ukrainian these are the usual forms, whereas in Russian they have reduced are more poetic.

    Like Я говорю українською мовою -
    українською мовою is the Instrumental of українська мова

    In Russian the -ою in the endings of adjectives and nouns have reduced to -ой.
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  20. #20
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nove Zamky, Slovakia
    Posts
    131
    Rep Power
    9
    There is another problem in SLovakia, but I am not sure if anybody cares about it....

    In our language we say: Anna Kournikovova... I think in Russian it is: Anna Kournikova

    ...
    Я ЕСТЬ потому что мы ЕСТЬ. Чтобы были МЫ -- ЕСТЬ Я.
    ПРОЛЕТАРИИ ВСЕХ СТРАН, СОЕДИНЯЙТЕСЬ!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. A few names
    By Gorky in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: December 10th, 2006, 08:13 PM
  2. About the three different names...
    By Wren in forum Russian Names
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: March 18th, 2006, 07:10 PM
  3. Some names....
    By basurero in forum Russian Names
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: January 4th, 2006, 09:37 AM
  4. names
    By kwatts59 in forum Russian Names
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: July 30th, 2005, 06:14 AM
  5. Names
    By Knave in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: February 3rd, 2004, 06:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary