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Thread: How you translate 'Moscow' in Russian letters?

  1. #21
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    Dunno, IMO K

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    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    Maybe, just maybe, they thought the ква meant корова and therefore translated it as cow?!??!??
    No, ква means "frog".

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexei
    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    Maybe, just maybe, they thought the ква meant корова and therefore translated it as cow?!??!??
    No, ква means "frog".
    So the English name should be Mosfrog.
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  4. #24
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    In Swedish it's Moskva, anyway...
    In Finnish........Moskova
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    So the English name should be Mosfrog.

    I'VE BEEN SAYING THAT FOR YEARS. The capital city of Russia is Mosfrog, and I'll be long gone in the cold dead dirt before I recognize Moscow as a city.
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  6. #26
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    Firstly, Americans tend to pronounce Moscow, like the Germans do Moss-cow. But the most common way to pronoucne the English word Moscow is Moss-ko. That's how it is in British English.

    I believe Moscow comes from Московский (the adjectival form of Moscow) or something. It has the root Moscov, and in Polish and German and other languages, v = w, like Krakow (pronounce Crack-off), therefore you get Moscow.

    The root of Moskva is Moskv, and from this the adjective Moskovskiy is formed with the help of the fill vowel o between the k and v.

    So to conclude, if you take into account that an Eastern European W = an English V, you get Moskwa (this is just as much a valid transliteration as Moskva).

    Moskowskiy ---> Moskow ---> Moscow

    So the Enlgish word didn't come from nowhere.

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  7. #27
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    I just wanna know how I must write that name. I don't will use it in a sentence. What is Goodbye in Russian letters? That's something like Do Swid

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    [quote=Meran]I just wanna know how I must write that name. I don't will use it in a sentence. What is Goodbye in Russian letters? That's something like Do Swid
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  9. #29
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    No, from The Netherlands

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rosa Anna
    OK. Could someone please explain...
    If the name of the city is москва (Mos-kva)(?) than why the ... is it written
    Mos-cow?

    ???
    I mean.... aren't all we all elsewhere saying it wrong?

    If so...why does it continue is my question.
    It could have something to do with the vocabulary of the native speaker's language. I cannot think of very many English words that do not have a vowel on both sides of a V if it is in the middle of a word. I think the "kva" sound in Moskva would be difficult for many English speakers who are not familiar with eastern European languages, and Moss-ko is an easier alternative to pronounce.

  11. #31
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    Moskva isn't at all hard for English speakers to say.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKnight

    It could have something to do with the vocabulary of the native speaker's language. I cannot think of very many English words that do not have a vowel on both sides of a V if it is in the middle of a word. I think the "kva" sound in Moskva would be difficult for many English speakers who are not familiar with eastern European languages, and Moss-ko is an easier alternative to pronounce.
    Hi GKnight,
    But we do have sk. Mosk-vah. flask. mask. sky. ski.
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    It was just a guess I figured I'd throw out there..
    I know there was a discussion back and forth about the pronounciation of Vitali Klitschko's first name during advertisements when he fought in Germany. It had something to do with the way Germans had a difficult time pronouncing his name, so they changed the pronounciation of his name for that fight. American boxing then thought the German pronounciation was correct and began saying his name incorrectly - finally he told everyone the correct way to say Vitali.

    The discussion was between saying "VIT-a-li" or "vi-TAL-i" - I don't know the reasoning for the German pronounciation.. I don't speak German.

    Regarding Moskva - perhaps something similar happened in the pronounciation from various cultures to evolve it to Moss-ko in the USA.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKnight
    It was just a guess I figured I'd throw out there..
    I know there was a discussion back and forth about the pronounciation of Vitali Klitschko's first name during advertisements when he fought in Germany. It had something to do with the way Germans had a difficult time pronouncing his name, so they changed the pronounciation of his name for that fight. American boxing then thought the German pronounciation was correct and began saying his name incorrectly - finally he told everyone the correct way to say Vitali.

    The discussion was between saying "VIT-a-li" or "vi-TAL-i" - I don't know the reasoning for the German pronounciation.. I don't speak German.

    Regarding Moskva - perhaps something similar happened in the pronounciation from various cultures to evolve it to Moss-ko in the USA.
    Florida, huh.. how's the weather? (answer, fablous (sp) of course)
    I can see where cultures and dialects find it easier to pronounce it all funny instead of learning a closer pronunciation. I mean, I didn't even know the correct "name" was other than Moss-Cow until I found this site. Then I felt cheated. I've never heard an English speaker say Moss-ko though they may. It always sounds like Cow as in livestock. America seemed so intimidated by Russian progress in technology when I was younger that I guess I just sorta figured it was... well, nevermind anyway, I thought it was used so as an insult--because it's perfectly easy to pronounce in English mosk-va. I would like to see it pronounced and understood correctly, not like that's going to happen unless Russia puts it's foot down with the UN or something. If it even bothers them enough.
    My pet piev I think.


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    Moss-cow sounds stupid to British people. So does Cra-cow (for Krakow).
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  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rosa Anna
    Florida, huh.. how's the weather? (answer, fablous (sp) of course)
    I can see where cultures and dialects find it easier to pronounce it all funny instead of learning a closer pronunciation. I mean, I didn't even know the correct "name" was other than Moss-Cow until I found this site. Then I felt cheated. I've never heard an English speaker say Moss-ko though they may. It always sounds like Cow as in livestock. America seemed so intimidated by Russian progress in technology when I was younger that I guess I just sorta figured it was... well, nevermind anyway, I thought it was used so as an insult--because it's perfectly easy to pronounce in English mosk-va. I would like to see it pronounced and understood correctly, not like that's going to happen unless Russia puts it's foot down with the UN or something. If it even bothers them enough.
    My pet piev I think.


    Have a great day!
    I agree - why not call places what they are instead of making up other names for them? It bothers me too. Weather is currently sunny with temperature: 85F/29C, and I'm tired of it. I miss snow skiing. Well, I miss snow period! Having two "seasons" - sunny or raining - is not so wonderful. Christmas just isn't right when you can go to the beach instead of gather next to the fireplace. The grass is always greener on the other side..

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    Another of my commentaries on the English language :)

    Quote Originally Posted by GKnight
    Quote Originally Posted by Rosa Anna
    OK. Could someone please explain...
    If the name of the city is москва (Mos-kva)(?) than why the ... is it written
    Mos-cow?

    ???
    I mean.... aren't all we all elsewhere saying it wrong?

    If so...why does it continue is my question.
    It could have something to do with the vocabulary of the native speaker's language. I cannot think of very many English words that do not have a vowel on both sides of a V if it is in the middle of a word. I think the "kva" sound in Moskva would be difficult for many English speakers who are not familiar with eastern European languages, and Moss-ko is an easier alternative to pronounce.
    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    Moskva isn't at all hard for English speakers to say.
    It's not that English-speakers can't say the -kv- sound, just that it's very unusual, so at some point in history, the pronunciation of Maskva was changed in our language to suit our ways of pronunciation.

    True, there aren't many words in the English language that have a -v- next to a consonant sound, but there are a few.
    Envoy, envy, invaluable, svelte, convey, kvetch, dovecote (remember that I said "consonant sounds": давкоут) and valve - there's a good start.

    The English language just generally doesn't allow the same combinations of consonant sounds as Russian does, e.g. -vm-, -vn-, -vl-, -vr-, -vs- etc.

    Bear in mind that the same thing happens when Russian-speakers try to pronounce English words. The -th- consonant sound and vowel combinations like the /aue/ in "sour", the /au/ in "round", the /aie/ in "fire" can often be mispronounced.

    I'm sure that most people on this board would agree that when you are learning a foreign language, the pronunciation seems weird and uncomfortable, but you adapt in order to speak the new language. When one word is imported to a different language (as would be the case with a place name of a major city like Moscow) then that one word will be mispronounced to fit in more comfortably with the rest of the language.
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  18. #38
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    Interesting, but who was the wanker who first started to pronounce it Moss-Cow?

    It was always Moscow until more recently (2 or 3 decades). It wouldn't surprise me if it was some television news anchor. They have a habit of butchering foreign names.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DDT
    Interesting, but who was the wanker who first started to pronounce it Moss-Cow?

    It was always Moscow until more recently (2 or 3 decades). It wouldn't surprise me if it was some television news anchor. They have a habit of butchering foreign names.
    saying "Moss-cow" instead of "Moss-ko" is such an American thing to do.
    It's like when I hear American's pronounce names like Makowsky (Ma-cow-skee). It's fucking Ma-koff-skee.

    I watched the Russian film Ya shagayu po Moskve dubbed into English (by American actors) and they were all saying Moss-cow, except one guy who said Moss-ko.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKnight
    I agree - why not call places what they are instead of making up other names for them? It bothers me too. Weather is currently sunny with temperature: 85F/29C, and I'm tired of it. I miss snow skiing. Well, I miss snow period! Having two "seasons" - sunny or raining - is not so wonderful. Christmas just isn't right when you can go to the beach instead of gather next to the fireplace. The grass is always greener on the other side..
    May I say, not the grass is greener, rather than the snow is whiter - at the moment Sorry, if it is all incorrect, I meant to say, у нас не столько трава зеленее, сколько снег белее, в данный момент(because there's no grass yet, only snow)

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