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Thread: English to Russian

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin
    What is the difference between saying:

    Я заинтересован в (I am interested in) and:

    Я интересуюсь (verb интересоваться) ? How would you conjugate this for Oн, Oнa, Oнo and so on?

    он, она, оно интересуется

    And if I wanted to say I like to do 'something' (the something being another verb, how would this be done?

    Я люблю to watch (смотреть - смотретю? there's no such word, смотретю) Я любйть смотретю тедевйзор? (Is that right? - I know how to conjugate the first verb, but not the second one after that) How would this conjugation be done generally, say if I wanted to say:

    I like to listen, to go, and so on? Do I leave the verb in the infinitive, or conjugate it as I would with I?

    Oh, and another 2 verbs I don't understand the difference:

    иэуцать - study (я иэуцаю) and заниматься -? (я занимаюсь?)

    Thanks guys.

    Also, is it appropriate I am listening to Чайковский ?
    Don't mix up й and и. They are two different letters/sounds:
    и is a vowel
    й is a consonant
    So it's not любйть, it's любить
    Not тедевйзор, but телевизор

    I like watching TV = I like to watch TV = Я люблю смотреть телевизор.
    I like = Я люблю
    to watch (infinitive) = смотреть (infinitive)

    Quite simple, isn't it?

    Don't mix up э and з:
    э is a vowel
    з is a consonant
    They sound VERY different.

    So it's not иэуцать and иэуцаю. It's изучать and изучаю.

    The difference... well, it depends on the context.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  2. #22
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    Thanks Оля!

    Yes I know I made a small mistake with the E and Z letters. Its the keyobard I am using, im not used to the letter-configuration yet and so have trouble writting, but I know with what letters they are actualyl written in.

    Oh, and sorry for the люблю, thats what I meant to writte rather than Liubit which is just the verb.

    So to its just as simple as to conjugate the first verb and have the second on in the infinitive? THanks. Is that for all verbs or are there exceptions?

    As for Television, its strange as in the Book it says its with a й and not и. Still, id rather trust a Russian hehe

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin
    Is that for all verbs or are there exceptions?
    Like what? "Я люблю смотрю"? "Я люблю пью пиво"? "Я люблю гуляю?" It's impossible. It's grammatically incorrect. It's rubbish.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  4. #24
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    [quote=Оля]
    Quote Originally Posted by "Chancellor Kremlin":39igvv30
    Is that for all verbs or are there exceptions?
    Like what? "Я люблю смотрю"? "Я люблю пью пиво"? "Я люблю гуляю?" It's impossible. It's grammatically incorrect. It's rubbish.[/quote:39igvv30]

    I don't understand. What I meant was is that all I have to do? Conjugate the first verb and then leave the second verb in the infinitive? Because if it is I understand. If not, are there any verbs which must also be conjugated or are must they all be in the infinitive?

    Thanks.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin
    are there any verbs which must also be conjugated
    Well, as I said, it's impossible and grammatically incorrect.
    So yes, you should conjugate the first verb and leave the second in the infinitive.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  6. #26
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    [quote=Оля]
    Quote Originally Posted by "Chancellor Kremlin":1s2vabsj
    are there any verbs which must also be conjugated
    Well, as I said, it's impossible and grammatically incorrect.
    So yes, you should conjugate the first verb and leave the second in the infinitive.[/quote:1s2vabsj]

    Спасибо

  7. #27
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    Oh, and the х in the Russian alphabet.

    Is it pronounced Kh as in KazaKHstan, or as J in Jelly?

    Or neither?

  8. #28
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    Of course it's not like J in Jelly.
    I also don't know how you pronounce the word "Kazakhstan" in English. The Russian x is like the German ch in "Buch" or the Spanish j in "trabajo".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Of course it's not like J in Jelly.
    I also don't know how you pronounce the word "Kazakhstan" in English. The Russian x is like the German ch in "Buch" or the Spanish j in "trabajo".
    Hmmn, I don't know how Germans pronounce Buch. But I know trabajo in spanish is pronounced trabaho, so is it a H sound? Like the H in horrible?

    Oh, and What is the difference between saying:

    Я заинтересован в (I am interested in) and:

    Я интересуюсь (verb интересоваться) ?

    Does it depend on the context? Can you give me some examples?

    Thanks.

  10. #30
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    H is rather hard, usually Russian H goes like KH.

    Я заинтересован accentuates your eagerness and your state of being interested in something. It sounds formal usually. Я интересуюсь is your habitual or present interest in something. You may use it in plethora of situations...

    Я заинтересован в подписании мирного договора.
    I am interested in signing the peace treaty.

    Я заинтересован в нём, как в партнёре по бизнесу.
    I am intersted in him as a business partner.

    Я заинтересован записать всё, что вы скажете.
    I am interested in writing down every word you say.

    Я интересуюсь подписыванием мирных договоров.
    My interest is signing peace treaties.

    Я интересуюсь партнёрами по бизнесу.
    I look for business partners (for a long time).

    Я интересуюсь вашими словами.
    I am interested in what you say.

    I hope I covered some meanings.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  11. #31
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    But I know trabajo in spanish is pronounced trabaho, so is it a H sound? Like the H in horrible?
    Well, the j in "trabajo" sounds much harder then the English h...

    Я интересуюсь историей Древнего Китая.
    (you can't say "я заинтересован в истории Дрейнего Китая" which would mean you have some private or bussines interest in the Ancient China's history )


    P.S. On this page:
    http://www.internetpolyglot.com/french/ ... 4302101290
    you can listen to the verbs пахнуть, сохранять and уходить which contain the х sound. I hope that hepls.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  12. #32
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    Zdrastvoitye everyone

    Please can someone help me very urgently with a translation into Russian; I want to have a t-shirt printed with the words "I am high" on the front, and "Gymnastics is my drug" on the back, can anyone help me with that? I've been told that "I am high" is "ya pat keyfam", is that right and is it acceptable to use? And how do I say "gymnastics is my drug"?

    I will be eternally gratefull for anyone who can help me out, thank you!

    Lv TheSouthAfricanRussian

  13. #33
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    Thanks Rtyom and Оля,

    That helped a lot. If I have any more questions I will ask them.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSouthAfricanRussian
    Zdrastvoitye everyone

    Please can someone help me very urgently with a translation into Russian; I want to have a t-shirt printed with the words "I am high" on the front, and "Gymnastics is my drug" on the back, can anyone help me with that? I've been told that "I am high" is "ya pat keyfam", is that right and is it acceptable to use? And how do I say "gymnastics is my drug"?

    I will be eternally gratefull for anyone who can help me out, thank you!

    Lv TheSouthAfricanRussian
    I am high = я под кайфом (ya pod kaifom)
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin

    As for Television, its strange as in the Book it says its with a й and not и. Still, id rather trust a Russian hehe
    No, your book has и with an acute accent over it to mark that the vowel is stressed, it wasn't a й. Й will never appear between two consonants (as it is a consonant itself).
    Ingenting kan stoppa mig
    In Post-Soviet Russia internet porn downloads YOU!

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin

    As for Television, its strange as in the Book it says its with a й and not и. Still, id rather trust a Russian hehe
    No, your book has и with an acute accent over it to mark that the vowel is stressed, it wasn't a й. Й will never appear between two consonants (as it is a consonant itself).
    Yes, you are right, it was an accute accent.

    Anyway, more questions:

    What is the difference in the verb изуцамь (study) and the verb заниматься (I think that is how you spell it - don't know what it means) ?

    And I have two books which disagree on the meanings of Station (as in Train Station). One says станция and the other вокзал. Im assuming it is станция as Railway Station reads железнодорожная станция. So what does вокзал mean?

    Would Bus Station read автобус станция?

    Oh, and another thing: To go by transport (ежать). If I wanted to specify what type of transport, would I say: я еду у такси ( I go (by transport) by taxi?) or я еду так___ (an ending denominating 'by means of'?)


    Lastly, is this how you spell my name, Yuri - Юрий?

    спасибо!

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin
    What is the difference in the verb изучать (study) and the verb заниматься (I think that is how you spell it - don't know what it means) ?
    Well, "я занимаюсь" literally means "I occupy myself", "I'm occupied (with)...". But the meaning could be different depending on the context.

    Изучать means to study smth seriously. I.e. "Я изучаю историю", "она изучает иностранные языки" (the latter doesn't actually mean that she studies them at school, but rather that she studies them quite seriously, that there are many languages that are her interest; that she studies linguistics maybe).

    Actually, you can also say "Она занимается иностранными языками", with the same meaning. But if you say "Она занимается английским", that could mean that she studies it seriously, or that she's at home right now preparing herself for an exam ("Она занимается иностранными языками" doesn't have that meaning because you can't study several languages at the same moment ).

    "Сегодня вечером мне надо заниматься" (you can't say "Сегодня вечером мне надо изучать").
    By the way, "изучать" always requires an addition (изучать язык, изучать биологию, etc), but "заниматься" doesn't.

    And I have two books which disagree on the meanings of Station (as in Train Station). One says станция and the other вокзал. Im assuming it is станция as Railway Station reads железнодорожная станция. So what does вокзал mean?
    Вокзал is a big railway station in a large city (ok, or in a town). Станция is a (very) small station.

    Would Bus Station read автобус станция?
    Nope.
    Автобусная остановка.

    Oh, and another thing: To go by transport (ехать). If I wanted to specify what type of transport, would I say: я еду на такси ( I go (by transport) by taxi?) or я еду так___ (an ending denominating 'by means of'?)
    Sorry, I didn't understand what the "я еду так___ " part means.*

    Lastly, is this how you spell my name, Yuri - Юрий?
    Yes, the Russian name is Юрий. Is it your name?

    *Ah! I got it! No, you can't say Я еду такс + ending in the instrumental case because the word такси is indeclinable. But you can say "я еду автобусом", "я еду поездом".
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  18. #38
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    Ahh I see, thanks for all your answers, they are really helpful.

    Sorry for all my various spelling mistakes, I am still not tuned to this new keyboard and sometimes I confuse similar looking (to foreigners at least) letters.

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Автобусная остановка
    Why does it change? What does остановка mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Yes, the Russian name is Юрий. Is it your name?
    Yes it is. My parents decided to name me after Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space. Iuri was quite a popular name in Brazil those days anyway, so the spelling variant did no harm

    Btw, sorry if this thread is now off topic, it can be moved if necessary.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chancellor Kremlin

    Oh, and another thing: To go by transport (ежать). If I wanted to specify what type of transport, would I say: я еду у такси ( I go (by transport) by taxi?) or я еду так___ (an ending denominating 'by means of'?)
    The answer is rather complex. When you specify a type of transport you usually say "на такси" (as Оля has said). If you mean you are in a car which is a taxi you say "в такси".

    На чём ты приехал? На такси.
    Ты сейчас где? В такси / Еду на такси.

    With most types of transport you can also use instrumental case: "еду автобусом/поездом", but it doesn't applicable to taxi. "Такси" doesn't decline and "еду такси" would be incomprehensible.
    Налево пойдёшь - коня потеряешь, направо пойдёшь - сам голову сложишь.
    Прямой путь не предлагать!

  20. #40
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    [quote=Полуношник]
    Quote Originally Posted by "Chancellor Kremlin":11dn7zlc

    Oh, and another thing: To go by transport (ежать). If I wanted to specify what type of transport, would I say: я еду у такси ( I go (by transport) by taxi?) or я еду так___ (an ending denominating 'by means of'?)
    The answer is rather complex. When you specify a type of transport you usually say "на такси" (as Оля has said). If you mean you are in a car which is a taxi you say "в такси".

    На чём ты приехал? На такси.
    Ты сейчас где? В такси / Еду на такси.

    With most types of transport you can also use instrumental case: "еду автобусом/поездом", but it doesn't applicable to taxi. "Такси" doesn't decline and "еду такси" would be incomprehensible.[/quote:11dn7zlc]

    Thanks. I had forgotten Taxi is a 'foreign word' and so undeclinable.

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