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Thread: does "paka" always mean "bye"?

  1. #1
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    does "paka" always mean "bye"?

    i hear it in alot of contexts.

    also, does "budit" always mean "to wake" ?

    one more for your trouble. what does "sig-da" mean?

    thanks. I am learning russian one word at a time.

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    Re: does "paka" always mean "bye"?

    Quote Originally Posted by william
    i hear it in alot of contexts.

    also, does "budit" always mean "to wake" ?

    one more for your trouble. what does "sig-da" mean?

    thanks. I am learning russian one word at a time.
    Paka (пока) means "bye" not always. It can mean "while", "until", "so far", "meanwhile", "as now", etc, depending on context.

    Budit (будит) means he/she/it wakes up
    There is another word that sounds equal, but the spelling is будет (budet) and it means "will be".

    There is no "sig-da", but I think you mean vsegda ("always").
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Re: does "paka" always mean "bye"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Paka (пока) means "bye" not always. It can mean "while", "until", "so far", "meanwhile", "as now", etc, depending on context.
    Isn't 'пока' considered to be a bit rude? Or at least too informal unless you know the person well?

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    Re: does "paka" always mean "bye"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Grogs
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    Paka (пока) means "bye" not always. It can mean "while", "until", "so far", "meanwhile", "as now", etc, depending on context.
    Isn't 'пока' considered to be a bit rude? Or at least too informal unless you know the person well?
    a bit too informal - yes.
    Not so rude though. But you can't say poka to your boss. It's a fairwell for your friends, people of the same age with yours or younger than you, for your realrives and such.
    Я так думаю.

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    Re: does "paka" always mean "bye"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leof
    Not so rude though.
    Not rude at all, I'd say. Just informal.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Re: does "paka" always mean "bye"?

    Quote Originally Posted by william
    i hear it in alot of contexts.

    also, does "budit" always mean "to wake" ?

    one more for your trouble. what does "sig-da" mean?

    thanks. I am learning russian one word at a time.

    You should learn how to spell them as well.
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    До свидания dasvidánya means "Good-bye".
    Пока paká means "Bye". Nothing rude about it, probably said more than До свидания.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    До свидания dasvidánya means "Good-bye".
    Пока paká means "Bye". Nothing rude about it, probably said more than До свидания.
    It's more informal, and if you use something informal in a formal context it's considered rude.
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    It can be rude when you want to get rid of somebody...
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    It can be rude when you want to get rid of somebody...
    I meant this too.

    And not only this.
    Если незнакомому человеку сказать "пока", это можно назвать фамильярностью и не редко грубостью.
    Я так думаю.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    It can be rude when you want to get rid of somebody...
    So, both пока and привет can be used as a rude bye? What would be the best "rude" bye in an e-mail - without wanting to say прощай...
    Я вас любил так искренно, так нежно,
    Как дай вам бог любимой быть другим.

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    "Привет" and "пока" are rude when you mean you are being rude. There's no prejudice in using them when you know people very well and they're aprroximately of your age. In all toher cases, more formal style is preferable.

    "Прощай" is way too high flown... To me, this kind of farewll means that I'm no longer supposed to hear from that person who says it. You'd better make use of more everyday phrases like "до свидания" (this one is accepted by anyone, anywhere, and anytime).
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    It can be rude when you want to get rid of somebody...
    Yes, that's it. I got the idea it was rude from one of the conversations in the Princeton Russian course, and that was exactly the context. It was in the very first lecture of the course, so it wasn't explained very well.

    Спасибо всем.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    "Привет" and "пока" are rude when you mean you are being rude. There's no prejudice in using them when you know people very well and they're aprroximately of your age. In all toher cases, more formal style is preferable.

    "Прощай" is way too high flown... To me, this kind of farewll means that I'm no longer supposed to hear from that person who says it. You'd better make use of more everyday phrases like "до свидания" (this one is accepted by anyone, anywhere, and anytime).
    Well, sometimes you want to be rude. And sometimes, you don't want to hear that person again...
    Я вас любил так искренно, так нежно,
    Как дай вам бог любимой быть другим.

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    Не знаю, я б сказал, что пшолты is what you would say to be rude. Is that пшлаты to a female?! New initial consonant cluster!

    (I hope you have seen the movie Кукушка)

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    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    Is that пшлаты to a female?!
    Yes.
    But what does пшолты or пшлаты have to do with "hi" and "bye"?.. I'd say it rather means "leave me alone" (at least in the "Кукушка" context).
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leushka
    Quote Originally Posted by Rtyom
    It can be rude when you want to get rid of somebody...
    So, both пока and привет can be used as a rude bye? What would be the best "rude" bye in an e-mail - without wanting to say прощай...
    Бывай!

    in the speech it can be also sarcastic - "Ага, бывай..." or "Ну, бывай..."
    It is a common fairwell in some circles (teenagers, gangs, punks), some people use it daily and are friendly enough when say it. But usually it sounds without ceremony and harsh and easily can be taken as your wish to be rude. And it is almost "Прощай", but still a little different.
    Я так думаю.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leof
    Бывай!

    in the speech it can be also sarcastic - "Ага, бывай..." or "Ну, бывай..."
    It is a common fairwell in some circles (teenagers, gangs, punks), some people use it daily and are friendly enough when say it. But usually it sounds without ceremony and harsh and easily can be taken as your wish to be rude. And it is almost "Прощай", but still a little different.
    Thanks.

    And yes, Кукушка is a great movie. But at the time I only knew one of the three languages.
    Я вас любил так искренно, так нежно,
    Как дай вам бог любимой быть другим.

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    This reminds to me one more common farewell "давай"/"ну, давай".
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

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    I thought about it, ut for me it is not that rude.
    Я так думаю.

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