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Thread: Uzbek

  1. #1
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    Uzbek

    Hello people I am new here (been lurking around for a couple months) I like this site alot very helpful .

    My question is can anyone translate this text for me I can slowly work out russian text , but I have to resources to translate Uzbek thanks .

    Privetik! Kak delishki? chyo propal?
    Pogodka ceychas klassnaya, ne pravda li?
    Chem zanimaeshsya? Ya dumayu u tebya mnogo raboti INCOGNITO!
    Nu vrode i vsyo pishi esli budet vremya i nestesnyaysya zadavay voprosi.
    POKA!

    thanks again for any help!!

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    It's Russian.

    Hi! How you doing? Why did you disappear?
    The weather is awesome, isn't it?
    What are you doing? I think you have a lot of work INCOGNITO!
    I guess that's all for now, write me if you have time and feel free to ask your questions. See ya.

    PS: There's a special section to ask for translation.

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    thanks for the translation , forgot about the other section .

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    A lot of people in Uzbekistan prefer to speak Russian, not Uzbek. A lot among of them do not speak Uzbek at all. Me myself, for examle.
    DO NOT READ MY SIGNATURE!

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    yes my friend here in america is from Uzbekistan she can't understand russian very well , but her sister in Uzbekistan can. I guess because she worked in moscow for a couple summers , and for the reason you have stated .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    yes my friend here in america is from Uzbekistan she can't understand russian very well , but her sister in Uzbekistan can. I guess because she worked in moscow for a couple summers , and for the reason you have stated .
    Well, if she is not from major cities, she may not speak Russian well, aspecially if she is young, after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.
    DO NOT READ MY SIGNATURE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.
    Even if the new govt doesnt like the old soviet style ways, which they say they don't but all the new govts seem to be pretty much evil dictating regims anyways. But, it doesn't make much sense to me why they would go from russian back to uzbek, or kazak, or kyrgiz. Why switch from a language that is spoken so widely and could be used in business deal with many countries and trading, back to the spear chucking 1,000 dialect speaking language you spoke 100 years ago.

    With russian, people from estonia could talk to people in east ajalalalabadastan, But now that everyone is going back to their own crappy language for some big nationalistic USSR style campaign to get people motivated to live in that country. They'll all be cut off from the rest of europe and eastern asia cuz they'll just speak the kush kush cave dialect of tajik that only people within 25km radius understand.

    But thats probly what the govt wants, keep people stupid and within the boarders. But if ur gunna control ur citizens so much, why not just go back to USSR. Stupid hippocrites and their all but forgotten languages.
    Вот это да, я так люблю себя. И сегодня я люблю себя, ещё больше чем вчера, а завтра я буду любить себя to ещё больше чем сегодня. Тем что происходит,я вполне доволен!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogboy182
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.
    Even if the new govt doesnt like the old soviet style ways, which they say they don't but all the new govts seem to be pretty much evil dictating regims anyways. But, it doesn't make much sense to me why they would go from russian back to uzbek, or kazak, or kyrgiz. Why switch from a language that is spoken so widely and could be used in business deal with many countries and trading, back to the spear chucking 1,000 dialect speaking language you spoke 100 years ago.

    With russian, people from estonia could talk to people in east ajalalalabadastan, But now that everyone is going back to their own cra@@y language for some big nationalistic USSR style campaign to get people motivated to live in that country. They'll all be cut off from the rest of europe and eastern asia cuz they'll just speak the kush kush cave dialect of tajik that only people within 25km radius understand.

    But thats probly what the govt wants, keep people stupid and within the boarders. But if ur gunna control ur citizens so much, why not just go back to USSR. Stupid hippocrites and their all but forgotten languages.
    Best post ever.

    Furthermore, petty nationalism does nothing to protect languages. People will learn the language(s) that are most useful to them.
    A case in point: Ukrainian has lost more ground to Russian since 1991 than in the previous 300+ years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogboy182
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.
    Even if the new govt doesnt like the old soviet style ways, which they say they don't but all the new govts seem to be pretty much evil dictating regims anyways. But, it doesn't make much sense to me why they would go from russian back to uzbek, or kazak, or kyrgiz. Why switch from a language that is spoken so widely and could be used in business deal with many countries and trading, back to the spear chucking 1,000 dialect speaking language you spoke 100 years ago.
    They're not going 'back' to anything, they are speaking the language they always spoke anyway in addition to Russian. The only difference is that now their own language is the official one. There's nothing to stop them learning a second language, such as Russian, for practical purposes, but it's a choice now rather than a duty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    yes my friend here in america is from Uzbekistan she can't understand russian very well , but her sister in Uzbekistan can. I guess because she worked in moscow for a couple summers , and for the reason you have stated .
    Well, if she is not from major cities, she may not speak Russian well, aspecially if she is young, after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.

    They are both from Tashkent and my friend in the states is 29 . I think she doesn' t speak russian just to spite the ol soviets , .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogboy182
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.
    Even if the new govt doesnt like the old soviet style ways, which they say they don't but all the new govts seem to be pretty much evil dictating regims anyways. But, it doesn't make much sense to me why they would go from russian back to uzbek, or kazak, or kyrgiz. Why switch from a language that is spoken so widely and could be used in business deal with many countries and trading, back to the spear chucking 1,000 dialect speaking language you spoke 100 years ago.

    With russian, people from estonia could talk to people in east ajalalalabadastan, But now that everyone is going back to their own cra@@y language for some big nationalistic USSR style campaign to get people motivated to live in that country. They'll all be cut off from the rest of europe and eastern asia cuz they'll just speak the kush kush cave dialect of tajik that only people within 25km radius understand.

    But thats probly what the govt wants, keep people stupid and within the boarders. But if ur gunna control ur citizens so much, why not just go back to USSR. Stupid hippocrites and their all but forgotten languages.
    I totally agree with you, only add, that Karimov regime is even worse then Soviet. And just recent may 13th bloodbath where they murdered hundreds of people made me really sad and unhappy with that government.

    Language - that was my pain. I did not speak Uzbek at all. My citizenship rights were limited because of that. Why India and other countries kept English as their state language? Why them are so stupid in post-soviet republics, I mean government. All science books was in Russian, all profesionals spoke russian. They even made up weird words for science terms which were not Russian, and uzbeks themself do not understand what that mean. *sigh*
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    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    yes my friend here in america is from Uzbekistan she can't understand russian very well , but her sister in Uzbekistan can. I guess because she worked in moscow for a couple summers , and for the reason you have stated .
    Well, if she is not from major cities, she may not speak Russian well, aspecially if she is young, after collapse of USSR government started really favoriting Uzbek, depressing Russian.

    They are both from Tashkent and my friend in the states is 29 . I think she doesn' t speak russian just to spite the ol soviets , .
    How long she's been to US? I cannot believe that she is from Tashkent and cannot speak Russian. Unless she is from Old City and her family is very traditional islamic uzbek family, but even though she would speak some Russian. My guess she just pretends she does not know Russian.
    DO NOT READ MY SIGNATURE!

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    Scotcher

    How long was the soviet union around, 70 years? something like that. How long before the soviet union had russian settlers and frontiersmen been traveling into central asia? At least 100 years. There is no logical explanation to switch back to the outdated and practically useless regional langauges. Its just like with american indians. If Alaska and Texas became their own countries, how much sense would it make if the Indians said "We want to get rid of english and make "whatever language' the state language even tho we havn't spoken it for 140 years".

    There's just no good reason. The only reason they are doing it is why i said before, they just want to further isolate themselves from their surrounding countries and try to repress their russain/ soviet past, and make their countries feel more 'individual'.

    There's nothing wrong with speaking the native langauge of your country, many american indians speak both english and whatever languahe their tribe spoke 200 years ago, but it wouldnt make a lot of sense to make the tribal language the state language now would it?

    If anything the former soviet countries should be grateful to russia, instead of changing all the names and tearing down statues of lenin. Without Soviet money, soviet workers and soveit help, those countries would be just like Afghanistan. Poor(er), living in huts, chasing goats, and singing songs of allah's fruitfull bounty. They should be gratefull russia felt like it was worth it wasting their time to bring them into the 21st century. If i was putin i would demand reperations.
    Вот это да, я так люблю себя. И сегодня я люблю себя, ещё больше чем вчера, а завтра я буду любить себя to ещё больше чем сегодня. Тем что происходит,я вполне доволен!

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    Dogboy182, I do not totally agree with you. Uzbek language is spoken by majority of the population there. Probably 90%. Out of them 90% speak Russian as well, but their primary language in most cases is Uzbek. That is the difference with native americans, who are just a few percent in population of US. It is better to compare to India, where hindi and English 2 state languages. I would be happy if both Uzbek and Russian would kept as state languages, I think that would be fair enough, as there is that 10% who do not speak Uzbek and most economically active population speaks Russian.

    Unfortunately they have choosen different way
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    If Uzbekistan wants to reemerge from the Third World someday, it will revert to Russian as its language of commerce and technology. The best alternative to that would be English, then French, then Chinese, then, I guess, Anatolian Turkish.

    Is Uzbek still using two alphabets ? What a joke.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioner
    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    How long she's been to US? I cannot believe that she is from Tashkent and cannot speak Russian. Unless she is from Old City and her family is very traditional islamic uzbek family, but even though she would speak some Russian. My guess she just pretends she does not know Russian.

    She has been in the states for around 6-7 years now , she is Korean so that probably has something to do with it (I think she is like 3rd generation Korean living in Uzbekistan) I know she understands a little Russian , the restraint I worked at with her had some Russian hockey players come in and she said she could only understand a little of what they were saying . Her younger sister in Uzbekistan understands Russian well and their mother speaks like six languages . I don't know how she got by in a soviet state without speaking Russian , or speaking Russian well anyway . Probably got by on her charm :P

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    Doesn't hebrew have 3 alphabets.
    Вот это да, я так люблю себя. И сегодня я люблю себя, ещё больше чем вчера, а завтра я буду любить себя to ещё больше чем сегодня. Тем что происходит,я вполне доволен!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical
    She has been in the states for around 6-7 years now , she is Korean so that probably has something to do with it (I think she is like 3rd generation Korean living in Uzbekistan) I know she understands a little Russian , the restraint I worked at with her had some Russian hockey players come in and she said she could only understand a little of what they were saying . Her younger sister in Uzbekistan understands Russian well and their mother speaks like six languages . I don't know how she got by in a soviet state without speaking Russian , or speaking Russian well anyway . Probably got by on her charm :P
    wow, really something special. I had a Korean girlfriend, back in Uzbekistan. I had a feeling that all koreans there speak better Russian then Uzbek. I never met a single korean who spoke poor Russian, and I met a lot of them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff
    If Uzbekistan wants to reemerge from the Third World someday, it will revert to Russian as its language of commerce and technology. The best alternative to that would be English, then French, then Chinese, then, I guess, Anatolian Turkish.

    Is Uzbek still using two alphabets ? What a joke.
    I think they are gradually switching to latin alphabet. It takes time for older people to adapt, but in general process is quite smooth.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff
    If Uzbekistan wants to reemerge from the Third World someday, it will revert to Russian as its language of commerce and technology. The best alternative to that would be English, then French, then Chinese, then, I guess, Anatolian Turkish.

    Is Uzbek still using two alphabets ? What a joke.
    The best alternative for them, you sick nationalist, is not to consult with you and keep their own native language.
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