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Thread: usually when local Russian school start to teach English?

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    usually when local Russian school start to teach English?

    I wonder is Russian compulsory to take English class at local Russian school in Russia. If yes, what year it start? If not, what is the most important foreign language in Russia?

    In Japan, it is hard to look for tiolet or washroom (no sign in English and no that easy to communicate in English), will this happen in Russia?
    from hk looking for language exchange. fluent in Mandarin, Cantonese, English and want to learn Russia. feel free to contact me through yahoo messenger. wish to learn more about Russia technology and recycle industrial.

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    Re: usually when local Russian school start to teach English

    Quote Originally Posted by msleelee
    I wonder is Russian compulsory to take English class at local Russian school in Russia. If yes, what year it start? If not, what is the most important foreign language in Russia?

    In Japan, it is hard to look for tiolet or washroom (no sign in English and no that easy to communicate in English), will this happen in Russia?
    It depends on the school. Some prefer to teach their children two languages from the time he learns to speak his native language. Of course, this is still a rare thing. Usually kids start learning foreign languages at the age of 8-10. Some schools offer 2 languages (i.e. English and German, or English and French), but English is considered the most important one (or the most widely spoken one). German is the second most popular language after English and then comes French.

    As for your second question - I don't think it's very difficult to locate a toilet in Russia (even by smell in some places ) and there is not such a big difference between 'туалет' and 'toilet' after all. And there are always English duplicates of any russian sign in places where foreigners are most likely to appear. And there is of course graphical signs that represent the most important messages like a door with an arrow that means 'Exit' and a figures of a man and a woman on the door of a toilet, a red cross near an emergency kit and a lightning and a scull on the electricity control panel.
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    but I guess where is not so many "public" toilets here, at least in my 1.5 million city you can count it by fingers of hand. So I guess it's better to use Mc'donalds or KFC
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    No, English is not compulsory in Russian schools; they have to teach at least one foreign language, but quite often it isn't English.

    I had my English classes start in the 2nd grade (age 8), but it was an optional course for our class until the 5th grade... The other students in the same school had their English classes start in 1st or 5th grade, depending on their specialization (my class had specialization in mathematics, another class in English so they started the classes in the very first week, and so on.) Our school didn't teach any other foreign languages, but the other school nearby teached just German and no English. Currently there are schools that teach new cool and trendy languages such as Japanese, but it isn't common.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ST
    but I guess where is not so many "public" toilets here, at least in my 1.5 million city you can count it by fingers of hand. So I guess it's better to use Mc'donalds or KFC
    thanks for your very useful information.
    from hk looking for language exchange. fluent in Mandarin, Cantonese, English and want to learn Russia. feel free to contact me through yahoo messenger. wish to learn more about Russia technology and recycle industrial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tyomitch
    No, English is not compulsory in Russian schools; they have to teach at least one foreign language, but quite often it isn't English.

    I had my English classes start in the 2nd grade (age , but it was an optional course for our class until the 5th grade... The other students in the same school had their English classes start in 1st or 5th grade, depending on their specialization (my class had specialization in mathematics, another class in English so they started the classes in the very first week, and so on.) Our school didn't teach any other foreign languages, but the other school nearby teached just German and no English. Currently there are schools that teach new cool and trendy languages such as Japanese, but it isn't common.
    wow Russian school has specification even in early schooling before 10 years old. no wonder Russia is dense with scientists.
    from hk looking for language exchange. fluent in Mandarin, Cantonese, English and want to learn Russia. feel free to contact me through yahoo messenger. wish to learn more about Russia technology and recycle industrial.

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    Re: usually when local Russian school start to teach English

    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    And there is of course graphical signs that represent the most important messages like a door with an arrow that means 'Exit' and a figures of a man and a woman on the door of a toilet, a red cross near an emergency kit and a lightning and a scull on the electricity control panel.
    That is true, but keep in mind that we like to play practical jokes on foreigners, so we may sometimes remove the skull and lightning bolt sign from the door of a transformer booth and put up a WC sign instead.
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    In most schools I know kids begin studying foreign language on their first or fifth year at school, depending on the school specialisation.
    In our city only three languages are taught at schools: English (predominant), French and German.

    Similary, if two foreign languages are taught, kids study their first one from the first grade (6-7 y/o), and the second one from the fifth grade (11-12 y/o).

    Language courses are compulsory, of course, as almost all school courses, and parents usually choose school for their kid keeping in mind the language they want the kid to know.

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