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Thread: Swearing in Russia, and Ukraine, and everywhere else...

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    Swearing in Russia, and Ukraine, and everywhere else...

    OK, I read this in the Kyiv Post : The “C” word: it’s a word that, even in the West, where everyday language (especially in the movies) is often laced with profanity, is just too much. Hearing that degrading term for the female anatomy doesn’t just make people flinch; it makes the people who hear it used think lower of those who use it.

    In English, the “C” word is way over the line, in the same way that swearing of any kind is in Ukraine.
    So it now has me asking, "Do the people in Russia, Ukraine, etc. swear openly in public. When I am at work, I often hear many swear words, all day long. Granted I work with men, but on TV I do hear swearing all the time, and I see the level of morality lowering all the time. What is this situation like there?? I'm interested to know...
    Не балуй!

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    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
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    Well some street swearing is muttered all the time, I am sure. Is the "C" word in Russian the same as the english "B" word?
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
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    The "C" word being referred to is a derogitory word for women, and it's not B*tch, it's C*nt. I think I'm asking more if Russians have a higher moral standard, or is it pretty common world wide that there is a lot of swearing going on???
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    DDT
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    You need to understand that the 'C" word as you put it, is only considered to be overly offensive in America. It is no worse than any other swear word anywhere else. In Australia is quite commonly used and even amongst women themselves. So I suggest you do some self analisis on what makes Americans tick!
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

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    Re: Swearing in Russia, and Ukraine, and everywhere else...

    Quote Originally Posted by Haksaw
    So it now has me asking, "Do the people in Russia, Ukraine, etc. swear openly in public. When I am at work, I often hear many swear words, all day long. Granted I work with men, but on TV I do hear swearing all the time, and I see the level of morality lowering all the time. What is this situation like there?? I'm interested to know...
    When I was growing up it was considered a very bad tone to use swear words in front of a woman and you could hear very little swearing in public places. It was always going on between men however. What we have now is completely different. It is pretty much everywhere... As one of my friends put it (when I came to visit Russia after about 2 years of absense and was somewhat surprised to hear how some of the people I knew spoke), "мы матом больше не ругаемся, мы на нем разговариваем!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haksaw
    The "C" word being referred to is a derogitory word for women, and it's not B*tch, it's C*nt. I think I'm asking more if Russians have a higher moral standard, or is it pretty common world wide that there is a lot of swearing going on???
    Don't worry, Russians don't have a higher moral standard. They don't use the C word, but they do use the direct translation. And calling someone a b*tch would be derogatory alright. Fortunately for the nation, one can always respond to verbal insults with physical violence. You don't want to insult the wrong person and get punched (shot) in the face. So there are personal standards but they are more related to how pumped up (or wimpy) you are.
    I've got a TV, and I'm not afraid to use it

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    To be fair, the c word is brilliant. *Especially* when Scots blokes say it after the word doss. Quality Quality sound!
    Tes yeux brillent si fort
    Comme moi quand je suis plein
    Bouff

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    Подающий надежды оратор
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    but on TV I do hear swearing all the time
    Fortunately, swearing on TV is rear in russia (but i haven't seen a TV for a year, maybe the things have changed now...)

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    JB
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    I love watching American shows on MTV in Russia. My favorite is "Pimp My Ride". The English can be heard under the Russian voice over. While the guys from the hood are exclaiming "whoa M@#^@r F@#$#@...." the Russian voice is saying "chort, chort, chort...."
    Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore.

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    I never even knew there was a c word until I went to Australia when I was 13 back in 1996...

    Since then I've been using it religiously...it's an awesome word.
    http://quickandsimplerussian.blog-city.com/
    I'm engaged to the most wonderful girl in the world, my Lana!!!

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    I never even knew there was a c word until I went to Australia when I was 13 back in 1996...

    Since then I've been using it religiously...it's an awesome word.
    http://quickandsimplerussian.blog-city.com/
    I'm engaged to the most wonderful girl in the world, my Lana!!!

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    Yes Aussies have so many tasty ways to use this misunderstood morsel of vernacular.

    Such as: C---- of a day!

    Which, in propper English translates aproximately to:

    "Particularly nasty weather we are having here don't you think, old boy?"
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

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    Is "Kurwa" used in Russian/Ukraine?

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    JJ
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    Mostly it is not used. There is more tasty word in Russian, it's bly@d' . But everybody know that word too.
    Gib immer 100% bei der Arbeit: 12% am Montag, 23% am Dienstag, 40% am Mittwoch, 20% am Donnerstag, 5% am Freitag ...

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    курва (male version - курвель) are used in Russia, but not very often. I think I average about 200 - 250 kurwas/kurwels a month, not more. Not a very popular word.
    Show yourself - destroy our fears - release your mask

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    Howdy! I was wondering if there are any Poms ....oops! I mean Englishmen here who could tell me exactly what a "Ruddy Bastard" is? I mean I know what a "bastard" is but what is the "ruddy" part supposed to add to it? Just curious that's all.......nothing much else going on here.
    Signed,
    a Wild Colonial Boy.
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

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    Почтенный гражданин Spiderkat's Avatar
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    Maybe this can help.
    British English informal, used to emphasize what you are saying, especially when you are annoyed with someone or something [= bloody, damn]:
    And here's a bit more about its origin.
    O.E. rudig, probably from rudu "redness," related to read "red" (see red). As a British slang euphemism for bloody (q.v.), first recorded 1914.
    De gustibus et coloribus non disputandum.

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    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
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    I thought of this post because Richard Pryor died today. For the few of you that may not know who he was, he was a comedian that taught white Americans how to say "mother-****er". I showed his stand-up act to my friend from Moscow. She is a level 4 English speaker, but she had to watch it a few times because he spoke so fast. She thought it was the funniest 'M-F' thing she had ever seen. I asked her about swearing in Russia... She said men are more likely to swear in public, but women swear amongst friends. <knitting-circle " it's knit, pearl, knit, pearl you silly (fill in blank)"> Social strata has a bit to do with it as well. Factory workers swear alot as do high-end stock traders. Academics swear very little. Sports fans seem to swear alot too. My Belarusian friend was introduced to baseball by me. She loves the game, I sent her home with a Whiffle-ball set and a profound hatred for the Yankees. (I live in the Red Sox Nation) She would call out to opposing team players, wave and send kisses while she spouted epitaphs that can't be repeated.
    I swear at work to my maids, they love me for it. I'm "one of the guys" to them even though I'm a boss. I hug the head of housekeeping and say "sooka moi" (моя сука), she's a mean old lady that isn't well liked. I have picked up some other 'choice' phrases from the maids (мои девушки). I learned 'sooka' watching Patton with a Belarusian friend, the "I won't drink with a Russian son of a bitch" "From one son of a bitch to another" scene. THAT'S A DIRECT QUOTE !
    I have taught a few of the maids the difference between BEACH and BEACHE, one is the sand next to the ocean, the other is head of housekeeping. At the end of the season, I have a party on the BEACH(пляж) for my girls (мои девушки) and the BEACHE(сука) won't be allowed.
    I'm easily amused late at night...

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