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Thread: how did Californiya & Alaska departed from Russia.

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    how did Californiya & Alaska departed from Russia.

    how did California & Alaska departed from Russia. I want to know the reason behind it.please.

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    The presence of Russians in California was minimal with only some few trading posts established. The most prominent and most famous of such trading posts was Fort Ross, which was also the most southern Russian trading post in North America. Russian America - or Alaska, as it is known today - on the other hand was fully integrated in the Russian Empire.

    Neither trading posts nor colony were very profitable as the cost of transport and shipping was too high due to the large distances between the Russian mainland and the oversea colony. Also, the Spanish was moving into North America from the south, establishing towns, missions and forts south of Fort Ross, diminishing the possibilites of further Russian expansion southward. This resulted in Fort Ross being abandoned in 1842.
    The colony lasted a little longer though, although it is worth noting that the Russians never fully colonized the interior, but mostly stayed close to or on the coast. While the Russians had had a monopol on fur trading - the primary industry in Russian America - non-Russian companies moved into the region during the 1830s, although outside of Russian territory, with the Hudson's Bay Company in the lead, creating competition. Eventually, these companies were also allowed to sail in Russian waters, which only increased the competition even more. By the 1860s, the British had settled firmly in British Columbia, and the Russians realized that if disputes rose between the two parties, it wouldn't be difficult for the British to capture the Russian territory. Therefore, the Russians made a quick move after the American Independence War, and sold all of the Russian territory to the Americans in 1867, which meant a definite end to Russian presence in North America.

    I have got my hands on a book called "Russians in Alaska: 1732 - 1867" by Lydia T. Black. I haven't gotten to read it yet, but the subject sure is interesting. Wikipedia has got quite a lot information on the subject as well, if you want some free information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
    The presence of Russians in California was minimal with only some few trading posts established. The most prominent and most famous of such trading posts was Fort Ross, which was also the most southern Russian trading post in North America. Russian America - or Alaska, as it is known today - on the other hand was fully integrated in the Russian Empire.

    Neither trading posts nor colony were very profitable as the cost of transport and shipping was too high due to the large distances between the Russian mainland and the oversea colony. Also, the Spanish was moving into North America from the south, establishing towns, missions and forts south of Fort Ross, diminishing the possibilites of further Russian expansion southward. This resulted in Fort Ross being abandoned in 1842.
    The colony lasted a little longer though, although it is worth noting that the Russians never fully colonized the interior, but mostly stayed close to or on the coast. While the Russians had had a monopol on fur trading - the primary industry in Russian America - non-Russian companies moved into the region during the 1830s, although outside of Russian territory, with the Hudson's Bay Company in the lead, creating competition. Eventually, these companies were also allowed to sail in Russian waters, which only increased the competition even more. By the 1860s, the British had settled firmly in British Columbia, and the Russians realized that if disputes rose between the two parties, it wouldn't be difficult for the British to capture the Russian territory. Therefore, the Russians made a quick move after the American Independence War, and sold all of the Russian territory to the Americans in 1867, which meant a definite end to Russian presence in North America.

    I have got my hands on a book called "Russians in Alaska: 1732 - 1867" by Lydia T. Black. I haven't gotten to read it yet, but the subject sure is interesting. Wikipedia has got quite a lot information on the subject as well, if you want some free information.
    I think russian emporer were unable to cover all it's ground, because there were no means of transports and all those facilities needed for strong hold on Alaska. while America was devloping nation on other hand after their independace. was their any kind of warfair.

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    There was no warfare between the Russian and the other colonial powers, but there was warfare between the Russian and some of the indigenous peoples, in particular the Tlingit. But well, that wasn't remarkable at the time being, as warfare and rivalry between Europeans and indigenous peoples was quite commonplace throughout the Americas during the colonialisation.

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    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
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    Nikolay Petrovich Rezanov is an interesting story as is Bering.1867 was shortly after the American Civil War (1861-1865). American Revolution (1775–83, also American War of Independence).

    I saw a good documentary and read about it a few years ago. Too early to remember the books' names.
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  6. #6
    Hanna
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    Russia thought Alaska wasn't worth much, and sold it when it was in a middle of a war and needed some extra cash for the state.

    Little did they know that 1) Oil would become one of the worlds most valuable natural assets, and 2) Alaska is full of oil.

    As a result, there are a fair number of Russian orthodox people in Alaska, and some native people there have Russian names.

    I read a fascinating article about a tribe of Alaska native people (eskimos) who had lived on two islands in the Bering Strait. The ones on the larger island remained Russian and those on the smaller island became Americans, even though they were all related to each other.. During the cold war, they lost all contact - the Russian eskimos became staunch believers in the ideology of the USSR and tried to convince their American relatives to join them on their island, but the American eskimos declined. Some interesting incidents happened where the eskimos met up in secret despite the cold war, but they also spied on each other and reported back to their respective countries! After the cold war they took up contact again, but only the older ones were able to communicate freely in their native language. The younger generations had become mainly Russian/English speakers. The American eskimos had also become born-again protestants, while the Russians were still orthodox but not religious.

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    Почтенный гражданин Dmitry Khomichuk's Avatar
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    In school I was taught that if Russia didn't sell Alaska, she(or it what should I use?) would simply lose it. Russia was in war and had no resources to fight for distant overseas land. British Empire tried to drop off forces in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. So having dominion east to Alaska (Canada) Britain could invade Alaska easily.

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