Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 78

Thread: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай rockzmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Coast, United States
    Posts
    2,185
    Rep Power
    15

    Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    When I was growing up I had the great pleasure of eating some of the most scrumptious desserts (and real food) one could ever imagine. My dad’s mom (Nana, as we call her) was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1903 and her mom was a seamstress for the nobility there. With her mom’s connections, she obtained recipes from some of the great European chefs and in turn, she passed them on to my Nana. Nana would make cream puffs from scratch with real custard filling and chocolate icing, mondel brot cookies, zucchini bread … and well, just all sorts of things. I am very pleased to say that my Nana is still alive and doing fairly well at 105 (for her 101st birthday she went to Disney World for the first time and actually rode the Haunted Mansion ride!).

    At one point in her life, she wrote down many of these recipes in a little book for a charity fundraiser ("Taste a Bit of Europe: Continental Pastries for the American Sweet Tooth"). I rediscovered my photocopy of this book recently and realized that she had noted the nationality of each of the recipes and it started me thinking about a thread for this forum. What if people posted one (or more) of their favorite recipes from their native areas? And… if they were also willing, give a little history about why the dish is important to them, what memories it brings back or what traditions it might hold for that area of the world. This would be a great way to learn about other areas of the world, customs, traditions, food and let people try new foods all at the same time. You could even include a photo of the food, so we know what the final product “should” look like.

    Now, I know that the U.S. uses different measurements than the rest of the world, so I have uploaded some cooking conversion tables to help out and here's that link http://www.mediafire.com/?yzyidyz5jiy

    To get things started, I have uploaded a copy of my Nana’s cook book http://www.mediafire.com/?ow1mewmntom

    If you already are familiar with any of these dishes, please let us know!

    Also, if you try one of the recipes posted on this thread, give your feedback or "review"!
    Did you like the dish? Was it easy to make? Too hard too make? Were the directions confusing? Was the food too spicy? Was it much better than it sounded? Did you have trouble finding ingredients? Were you familiar with all of the ingredients? Would you make it again? Blah, Blah, Blah...

    Here are the recipes in her book:

    From Austria:
    • Sacher Torte
      Rumplatzchen (Rum Cookies)
      Schaumtotre (a meringue base to use for ice cream, fruit or melon balls for a low calorie dessert)
      Nuss Torte (Nut Cake)
      Continental Frosting (Semi-sweet chocolate)

    From Belgium:
    • Pain D’ Amandes (Almond Cookies)
      Bohemian Wafers
      Angelique (Delicate Cake Roll)

    From Denmark:
    • Royal Crowns (Cookies)
      Danish Puff

    From England:
    • English Savouries (Hors D’oeuvres)
      London Mushroom Muffins

    From France:
    • Mayonnaise Canapé Pastry
      Gateau Bonbons
      Parisian Breakfast Puffs

    From Germany:
    • Linzer Kranze (Wreath Cookies)

    From Holland:
    • Apfel Kuchen (Apple Cake)
      Kletskoppen (Gossip Heads, lacy cookies)

    From Italy:
    • Calcioni (Filled Holliday Cookies)

    From Ireland:
    • Dublin Fruit Cake

    From Mexico:
    • Polvoroner (Cookies)

    From Norway & Sweden:
    • Norwegian Almond Bars

    From Poland:
    • Paderewskis (Party Cookies)
      Baba Un Rhum (Rum Cake with Whipped Cream, yet her recipe does not tell you how much Jamaican rum or how to make the whip cream!)
      Mazurek (Polish Breakfast Cake)

    From Portugal:
    • Pasteis de Belem (Puff Pastry, mini egg-custard pies)

    From Spain:
    • Cuernitos (Little Horns also known as Mexican Wedding Cookies)
      Castilian Layered Rum Cookies

    From Switzerland:
    • Schweitzer Shocoladen Torte (Chocolate Cake)
    I only speak two languages, English and bad English.
    Check out the MasterRussian Music Playlist
    Click here for list of Russian films with English subtitles and links to watch them.

  2. #2
    Старший оракул CoffeeCup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Snowbearia
    Posts
    902
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    When I was growing up my father sometimes at a weekend morning made French toasts. In a typical Russian family the principal cooker is a mother, so the time when a father prepares some food becomes memorizable. These French toasts we called as "eggy bread" but only few days ago I've become aware of the widely used name "French toasts". My awareness have originated from tricky cobweb of coincidences: 2003 invasion of Iraq, French opposition to such an invasion, renaming of "French fries" to "Freedom fries" in US opposition to the French opposition and finally the Ice Hockey Championship in Switzerland! So, how these events were tied? There were funny "Power Rankings" (as of May 1) for Ice Hockey teams where the US to French opposition were recalled in terms of the "Freedom fries". Seeking for the meaning I've found that that lovely eggy bread is called as the "French toast".
    So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай rockzmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Coast, United States
    Posts
    2,185
    Rep Power
    15

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeCup
    When I was growing up my father sometimes [s:24n1bihr]at a[/s:24n1bihr] on the weekend morning made French toast[s:24n1bihr]s[/s:24n1bihr] (it is singular for some odd reason). In a typical Russian family the principal cooker is [s:24n1bihr]a[/s:24n1bihr] the mother, so the time when a father prepares some food becomes [s:24n1bihr]memorizable[/s:24n1bihr] memorable. These French toast[s:24n1bihr]s[/s:24n1bihr] we call[s:24n1bihr]ed as[/s:24n1bihr] "eggy bread"; but, only few days ago I've become aware of the widely used name "French toast[s:24n1bihr]s[/s:24n1bihr]". My awareness [s:24n1bihr]have[/s:24n1bihr] originated from tricky cobweb of coincidences: 2003 invasion of Iraq, French opposition to such an invasion, renaming of "French fries" to "Freedom fries" in US opposition to the French opposition and finally the Ice Hockey Championship in Switzerland! So, how are these events [s:24n1bihr]were[/s:24n1bihr] tied together? There were funny "Power Rankings" (as of May 1) for Ice Hockey teams where the US to French opposition were recalled in terms of the "Freedom fries". Seeking for the meaning I've found that that lovely eggy bread is called as the "French toast".
    Yes, I remember well the whole Freedom Fries thing!

    I can smell the your French Toast now; however, to get the picture clearer in my mind's eye... please answer a couple of questions for me...
    Do you remember or know what type of bread your father use and were they really thick slices or thin?
    Did he add spices such as cinnamon or nutmeg to the egg mixture?
    And once it was finished, did you top it off with powdered sugar, maple syrup or butter or all three?

    p.s. I love the phrase you used..
    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeCup
    tricky cobweb of coincidences
    I only speak two languages, English and bad English.
    Check out the MasterRussian Music Playlist
    Click here for list of Russian films with English subtitles and links to watch them.

  4. #4
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    612
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by rockzmom

    From Poland:
    • Paderewskis (Party Cookies)
      Baba Un Rhum (Rum Cake with Whipped Cream, yet her recipe does not tell you how much Jamaican rum or how to make the whip cream!)
      Mazurek (Polish Breakfast Cake)
    never in my life have I tried any of these, what is more, I haven't even heard of Paderewskis, nor Baba Un Rhum.
    Mazurek is quite popular, but only made for Easter, I think. Not a tradition in my family, though

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    Quote Originally Posted by rockzmom
    Baba Un Rhum (Rum Cake with Whipped Cream, yet her recipe does not tell you how much Jamaican rum or how to make the whip cream!)
    ...never in my life have I tried any of these, what is more, I haven't even heard of Paderewskis, nor Baba Un Rhum.
    It might be what we call "ромовая баба" at our place... If it is, we know it very well. At least in Moscow and StP you can easily find it in a confectioner's shop. It is good. I like it.

    (hmm, but I actually don't understand what means "Whipped Cream", so it could be another thing)
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  6. #6
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    612
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    hmm, come to think of it, perhaps they meant "Babka", but it's also not served with whipped cream. It is very good though also a typical Easter cake.

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Russland
    Posts
    9,882
    Rep Power
    19

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    This is how our Ромовая баба looks like:

    In Saint Petersburg:
    http://crystal-penza.ru/images/subgroups/big/128.jpg

    In Moscow:
    http://pahlava.com/media/1/pp_89.jpg

    (maybe that white stuff is "whipped cream"?)

    The St. Petersburg one tastes much better than the one of Moscow.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  8. #8
    Почтенный гражданин Winifred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    236
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Оля says:
    (maybe that white stuff is "whipped cream"?)
    Looks more like icing: глазурь

    whipped cream = взбитые сливкиг

    To make whipped cream: Beat chilled cream until it forms stiff peaks (if it begins to turn yellow, stop,or you will have butter!) . Stir in sugar to taste, gently. Whipped cream! You can add vanilla or other flavoring, if you like.


    Correct my Russian, please! Пожалуйста, исправьте мои ошибки!

    Помогите мирy oдним щелчком ! Help the world with one click!
    http://www.thehungersite.com/clickTo...s_home_sitenav

  9. #9
    Завсегдатай rockzmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Coast, United States
    Posts
    2,185
    Rep Power
    15

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Nana wrote in the cookbook
    This recipe was conceived by King Stanislas Lezcynsku of Poland in the 18th Century. When his daughter, Maria married Louis XV, King of France, she introduced her father’s culinary invetntion to the French and named it after her husband’s favorite hero, Ali Baba.
    I also found this online
    Available at any time is one of the most luscious desserts in Paris, baba au rhum, made with rum-soaked sponge cake, or its even richer cousin, un Ali Baba, which also incorporates cream-based rum-and-raisin filling http://www.frommers.com/destinations...062022435.html
    Olya,
    That looks more like a white icing. This is more like it. The top and middle are whipped topping or whipped cream.


    And Alex (or other music fans), if you are reading this... did you ever listen or get your hands on this album? My parents had it!!


    Whipped Cream is heavenly and here is the the BEST recipe I have EVER found to make it. It is an Amish recipe from the cookbook, Cooking from the Quilt Country, by Marcia Adams:

    Whipped Cream Topping
    Makes 1 ½ cups or enough to liberally cover 1 pie

    The addition of corn syrup to the cream helps to stabilize it and the cream does not go flat, but stays nice and perky for a couple of days, though most pies don’t last that long. Sometimes, cooks complain that their cream doesn’t whip. An older cream (check the date on the container) whips better than newer cream, and the bowl and beater should be well chilled before using.

    1 cup very cold heavy whipping cream
    ¼ cup confectioners’ sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1 teaspoon light corn syrup
    Speak of salt

    In a cold mixer bowl, combine all the ingredients and whip until the cream is stiff and forms well-defined peaks. Don’t walk away and leave this while it is beating, though, for the mixture can turn into butter in a matter of seconds.
    I only speak two languages, English and bad English.
    Check out the MasterRussian Music Playlist
    Click here for list of Russian films with English subtitles and links to watch them.

  10. #10
    Почтенный гражданин Winifred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    236
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Looks like we're on the same wavelength, rockzmom! I like the size of your pics, though! I remember Herb Alpert, "The Look of Love," The Girl from Ipanema," etc! But, then, I'm o-l-d!

    My mother used to fix piroshki (пирожки), meat or apple or sauerkraut pies, and galoupsie (I cannot find the Russian equivalent: галупцы?? Someone please help! Google images of галупцы are NOT correct!), cabbage rolls stuffed with meat, onions and raisins and simmered in a tomato sauce. She always told me she had to make the recipes up, as her mother didn't teach her to cook (one of the many mysteries of my mother's life....).

    rocksmom, with your Southern heritage, you'll enjoy this: My Dad told me that when they first got married (Mom was a war bride from WWII), neither of them could cook. They decided to make Southern fried chicken one night and couldn't believe how long it took to keep flipping the chicken over and over in the frying pan, it just wouldn't finish cooking. Neither of them thought of cutting the bird up into pieces....!

    By the time my brother and I came along, Mom was an excellent cook, I couldn't even imagine her not knowing how!
    Correct my Russian, please! Пожалуйста, исправьте мои ошибки!

    Помогите мирy oдним щелчком ! Help the world with one click!
    http://www.thehungersite.com/clickTo...s_home_sitenav

  11. #11
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by Winifred
    Google images of галупцы are NOT correct
    That's probably because it's spelled голубцы.

    I love 'em. I had an Armenian friend whose mother used to make us vegetarian golubtsi stuffed with kind of a mushroom and rice pilaf. Очень вкусно! Just don't forget to top them with sour cream.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай rockzmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Coast, United States
    Posts
    2,185
    Rep Power
    15

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by Winifred
    I remember Herb Alpert, "The Look of Love," The Girl from Ipanema," etc! But, then, I'm o-l-d!
    he he...we are probably about the same age. Those are great songs!


    Quote Originally Posted by Winifred
    My mother used to fix...cabbage rolls stuffed with meat, onions and raisins and simmered in a tomato sauce. She always told me she had to make the recipes up, as her mother didn't teach her to cook (one of the many mysteries of my mother's life....).
    Nana also made stuffed cabbage rolls just as you described! I never cared for them. She would make them for my mom though. Nana lives with my dad in Wellington. I have asked him to try and get the recipes for the cream puffs and mondel brot. I will add the stuffed cabbage rolls to the list!


    Winifred...your story about the fried chicken reminds me of another one about roasting a turkey where the family used to cut off the tail end of the bird before cooking it. This went on for generations and everyone thought this was how to cook a turkey. Until one day someone said "ah, no, you don't cook it that way." So, they asked the grandmother why she did it that way only to discover that it was because her mom did it that way because she did not have a roasting pan big enough for the large turkey and that was the only way to make it fit!
    I only speak two languages, English and bad English.
    Check out the MasterRussian Music Playlist
    Click here for list of Russian films with English subtitles and links to watch them.

  13. #13
    Старший оракул CoffeeCup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Snowbearia
    Posts
    902
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by rockzmom
    Do you remember or know what type of bread your father use and were they really thick slices or thin?
    Did he add spices such as cinnamon or nutmeg to the egg mixture?
    And once it was finished, did you top it off with powdered sugar, maple syrup or butter or all three?
    Actually he used any type of bread. The slices thickness was about a half inch. Spices were not added. Once it was finished it was not possible to top it off, because we liked it so much and were not able to wait more, so the French toast immediately disappeared in our stomaches.
    So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

  14. #14
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    99
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Great idea, Rockzmom! I love to bake. I have to say, I never heard of Bohemian Wafers or Angelique before. Couldn't find any pictures either, so if you would happen to have any, I'd love to see them.

    I would suggest changing the name of the Dutch apple cake to appelkoek, appelcake of appeltaart however. Apfel Kuchen is German.

    I'll be sharing my recipe for waffles shortly. I don't know if it's a typically Belgian recipe but they're very tasty anyway .

  15. #15
    Почтенный гражданин Winifred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    236
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Quote Originally Posted by Winifred
    Google images of галупцы are NOT correct
    That's probably because it's spelled голубцы.

    I love 'em. I had an Armenian friend whose mother used to make us vegetarian golubtsi stuffed with kind of a mushroom and rice pilaf. Очень вкусно! Just don't forget to top them with sour cream.
    Thank you for the word! My husband and I are vegetarian (I call myself a "tribal" vegetarian, because like tribes of old, I'll eat meat - well, turkey or chicken - on holidays ), so I'm going to try out the mushroom/pilaf version! Sounds great!

    rockzmom wrote:

    he he...we are probably about the same age. Those are great songs!
    Guess we will both have to type fast to stave off arthritis
    Correct my Russian, please! Пожалуйста, исправьте мои ошибки!

    Помогите мирy oдним щелчком ! Help the world with one click!
    http://www.thehungersite.com/clickTo...s_home_sitenav

  16. #16
    Завсегдатай rockzmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Coast, United States
    Posts
    2,185
    Rep Power
    15

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    Great idea, Rockzmom! I love to bake. .
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    I would suggest changing the name of the Dutch apple cake to appelkoek, appelcake of appeltaart however. Apfel Kuchen is German.
    Hmmm, you had me go hunting in the only book my Nana wrote in that I have here in the house. I knew that Nana spoke German (an a few other languages) but it is odd that she listed the name of her cat as "kotik" (cat in Polish, she noted for me).

    Anyway, I am just trying to determine if maybe the person who gave the recipe to my Nana's mother would have spoken in German because that was the only language this person knew or is it possible that this person came from a small area of Holland/Netherlands that actually spoke German? Could that be possible, devochka? What do you think???

    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    I'll be sharing my recipe for waffles shortly. I don't know if it's a typically Belgian recipe but they're very tasty anyway .
    Can't wait! You will be posting scratch and sniff photos right

    Oh, and Olya... Nana wrote in her book to me that her best friend growing up was.. OLGA!!!
    I only speak two languages, English and bad English.
    Check out the MasterRussian Music Playlist
    Click here for list of Russian films with English subtitles and links to watch them.

  17. #17
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    99
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    There are only two languages spoken in the Netherlands, Dutch and Fries (Fries is only an official language in the province of Friesland). Today, there isn't a part of the Netherlands where German is being spoken. And to my knowlegde there has never been. (I think the construction of those last sentences is way of, but it's understandable, right?)

    So I would guess the person who gave the recipe only spoke German or maybe if he/she spoke German with your grandmother, he/she just gave the German name and didn't think of giving the name in its original language.

    What are scratch and sniff photos?

  18. #18
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    Today, there isn't a part of the Netherlands where German is being spoken. And to my knowledge there has never been.
    1940-1944?

    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай rockzmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Coast, United States
    Posts
    2,185
    Rep Power
    15

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    There are only two languages spoken in the Netherlands, Dutch and Fries (Fries is only an official language in the province of Friesland). Today, there isn't a part of the Netherlands where German is being spoken. And to my knowlegde there has never been. (I think the construction of those last sentences is way of, but it's understandable, right?)

    So I would guess the person who gave the recipe only spoke German or maybe if he/she spoke German with your grandmother, he/she just gave the German name and didn't think of giving the name in its original language.

    devochka. Thanks, you taught me something today! I had never heard of Fries or Friesland!
    Your thoughts about the name of the apple cake are a good possibility. I also found this on Wiki and maybe it might help explain as well. Also remember we are talking about pre 1900 here as Nana was born in 1903.

    High German
    Main article: High German languages
    High German is divided into Central German and Upper German. Central German dialects include Ripuarian, Moselle Franconian, Rhine Franconian, Central Hessian, East Hessian, Lower Hessian, Thuringian, Silesian, High Franconian, Lorraine Franconian, Mittelalemannisch, North Upper Saxon, High Prussian, South Markish and Upper Saxon. It is spoken in the southeastern Netherlands, eastern Belgium, Luxembourg, parts of France, and in Germany approximately between the River Main and the southern edge of the Lowlands. Modern Standard German is mostly based on Central German, but it should be noted that the common (but not linguistically correct) German term for modern Standard German is Hochdeutsch, that is, High German
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_language
    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    What are scratch and sniff photos?
    Ah.. it was sort of a joke since it won't work here on the internet... but a scratch and sniff photo is one that has the smell of whatever it is that you are looking at. They use it a lot here with say, air fresheners so you will know the fragrance of it before you buy it. They do it with other things as well. You use your fingernail to scratch a little patch on the container and then you can sniff it to smell the fragrance. So I was teasing you about sending a photo that we could smell your wonderful waffles!
    I only speak two languages, English and bad English.
    Check out the MasterRussian Music Playlist
    Click here for list of Russian films with English subtitles and links to watch them.

  20. #20
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    99
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Cooking -International Recipe Exchange- Come on Take a look!

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Quote Originally Posted by devochka
    Today, there isn't a part of the Netherlands where German is being spoken. And to my knowledge there has never been.
    1940-1944?


    Well, yes, but it was never adopted by the Dutch as their official language.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 9
    Last Post: May 19th, 2010, 01:16 PM
  2. Translating a Recipe
    By DanielleDW in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: March 14th, 2010, 02:34 PM
  3. Gun-free zones are recipe for disaster
    By Haksaw in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: April 22nd, 2007, 07:25 PM
  4. Please help translate this recipe.
    By abrett in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: March 5th, 2004, 09:49 PM
  5. International Women's Day.
    By Wintermute in forum Politics
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: May 31st, 2003, 06:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary