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  1. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
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    6,239

    More or less. "Floats your boat" is a bit...

    More or less. "Floats your boat" is a bit lighter, more like a joke. But yeah, they are the same kind of thing.
  2. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
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    20
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    6,239

    Not quite. This expression is often an insult....

    Not quite.

    This expression is often an insult. It can mean that you don't agree with what the other person is doing or saying, and that you think that they are doing that or thinking that thing...
  3. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
    Replies
    20
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    6,239

    Matroskin's comments are all correct. In...

    I'll try to bear that in mind, thanks for the comment :D

    ok, I think these are going to be the last ones (hopefully):
    Can you give out an exclamation, or you let it out?
    And is it correct to...
  4. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
    Replies
    20
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    6,239

    That's fine. I normally hear "Try as I might . ....

    That's fine. I normally hear "Try as I might . . ." You might want to check a grammar resource on may vs might if you want to be very formal about it.

    You just need a period at the end :) That's...
  5. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
    Replies
    20
    Views
    6,239

    They both refer to listening. Make out is almost...

    They both refer to listening. Make out is almost always used with a negative to mean you didn't hear something well, as in your example, or "I couldn't quite make out what you said/were saying." That...
  6. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
    Replies
    20
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    6,239

    That's exactly right.

    That's exactly right.
  7. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
    Replies
    20
    Views
    6,239

    Usually "say", at least in American English. I've...

    Usually "say", at least in American English. I've heard "read", but very rarely.
  8. Thread: a few questions

    by paulb
    Replies
    20
    Views
    6,239

    Re: a few questions

    "Point of" and "point in" are the same, but they are sometimes used in different contexts. Here's a few I can think of right now:

    There's no point in crying about it.
    What's the point in trying?...
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