Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: How do they address a policeman in your country? Обращение к милиционеру (полиц.)?

  1. #1
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Russia
    Posts
    1,038
    Rep Power
    20

    How do they address a policeman in your country? Обращение к милиционеру (полиц.)?

    I would like to hear about this. How exactly a person in the street could address a policeman. I am not sure we have such formal address now, i think in Russia something like "извините" (exuse me) would be ok, or maybe "товарищ милиционер".

    Как в вашей стране обращаются к милиционеру (полицейскому) на улице?

  2. #2
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    США
    Posts
    2,284
    Rep Power
    13
    in the US it's officer: excuse me officer, why do you have to give me a ticket as@hole.
    DrZero likes this.
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  3. #3
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Russia
    Posts
    1,038
    Rep Power
    20
    yes, that's funny)))) i thought it's officer in US, if i am not mistaken in France it's also officer (maybe we'll hear from somebody French)

  4. #4
    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Other Universe
    Posts
    8,501
    Rep Power
    26
    If you can see his rank (on shoulder straps): товарищ сержант/лейтенант/капитан/майор.
    If you don't see them (or can't distinguish): товарищ милиционер (some use господин милиционер, but I can't bring myself to say that to them). Some use the standard Извините...
    A funny thing is that we would have police instead of militia in a few months and even the Interiof minister still doesn't know what would be the proper form of address.
    Send me a PM if you need me.

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    США
    Posts
    2,284
    Rep Power
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by alexsms View Post
    yes, that's funny)))) i thought it's officer in US, if i am not mistaken in France it's also officer (maybe we'll hear from somebody French)
    Monsieur gendarme?
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  6. #6
    Hanna
    Guest
    I plan to stay well clear of the police when I visit Russia, but nevertheless, this is good to know. If you are already in trouble, I guess it's a good idea not to make it worse by accidentally sounding "rude".

    Btw, didn't you say that "товарищ" is outdated? Or is this the exception? Saying "Officer" to policemen is American usage. It's not normal in Britain. An American friend of mine did it here in the UK a while back and the policeman loved it.... Usually people are not that respectful. No particular form of address is needed (and I think it's the same in France; only "Monsieur", same as you would use with anyone.)

    Since we are talking about this topic.... can anyone give some tips on things that are illegal in Russia but may be completely "normal" in other countries... I mean things that you could get into trouble for in Russia, but wouldn't think twice about in other parts of the world. As an example; "jaywalking" in the US (=crossing the street when the Red man is showing - apparently serious offense there, they even have a special word for it...) or dropping a cigarette on the ground in Singapore ($10000 fine).

    If there is anything like that in Russia it would be good to know about it beforehand.

  7. #7
    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    СССР -> США
    Posts
    17,627
    Rep Power
    31
    Интересно, популярно ли сейчас у милиционеров обращение гражданин/гражданка?

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Other Universe
    Posts
    8,501
    Rep Power
    26
    Nothing like that. If you don't sell drugs or waving your AK-47 out in the open, if you don't attack other people and not running around naked, there's really nothing to be afraid of (from the police). Sometimes loud voices (or shouting, etc) can attract some attention, but nothing serious would come out of it (especially, if you're obviously - a foreigner).
    Oh, don't try to participate in some civil protest actions - you can end up in a police station.

    No matter what happens - just don't panic when police approaches you. They're mostly civil and polite. They will ask you for some documents and walk away. You might have heard some horror stories about militia but if you haven't done anything - there's little to worry about. Even if they detain you - you'll be released in several hours (in the worst case, provided you're a law abiding tourist).
    If they try to extort a bribe - haggle (arguing or refusing will cost you several more hours of wasted time - they'll release you anyway, so if you have spare time just ask to inform the ambassador or your country ))). Tell them you don't have much, you're a poor person and you've been saving for this trip during the last decade. You can even shed a tear or two... (no, really). Avoid aggravating them. Be calm and polite (even if they don't).
    Send me a PM if you need me.

  9. #9
    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Other Universe
    Posts
    8,501
    Rep Power
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Lampada View Post
    Интересно, популярно ли сейчас у милиционеров обращение гражданин/гражданка?
    Популярно - это уставное обращение, канцелярское. Они, по-моему, обязаны так обращаться.
    Send me a PM if you need me.

  10. #10
    Hanna
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil View Post
    Nothing like that. If you don't sell drugs or waving your AK-47 out in the open, if you don't attack other people and not running around naked, there's really nothing to be afraid of (from the police). Sometimes loud voices (or shouting, etc) can attract some attention, but nothing serious would come out of it (especially, if you're obviously - a foreigner).
    Oh, don't try to participate in some civil protest actions - you can end up in a police station.

    No matter what happens - just don't panic when police approaches you. They're mostly civil and polite. They will ask you for some documents and walk away. You might have heard some horror stories about militia but if you haven't done anything - there's little to worry about. Even if they detain you - you'll be released in several hours (in the worst case, provided you're a law abiding tourist).
    If they try to extort a bribe - haggle (arguing or refusing will cost you several more hours of wasted time - they'll release you anyway, so if you have spare time just ask to inform the ambassador or your country ))). Tell them you don't have much, you're a poor person and you've been saving for this trip during the last decade. You can even shed a tear or two... (no, really). Avoid aggravating them. Be calm and polite (even if they don't).
    Good tips! Thanks! Generally I'll try to stay well out of their way.
    All sounds reasonable and in line with what people have been saying here.

    After 10 years in England I am not used to showing documentation!

    I understand that it's common in Russia to get asked for it. Is that right? Is there any particular situations where Russia is extra (unexpectedly strict about ID? What would I have to show them - my passport only, or ID card? Do I have to carry it on me when I walk around in town?

    (I only have my Swedish ID and passport - English people strongly believe that ID documentation of any kind is true evil.... I have practically never needed to show any ID for as long as I've lived here. In the rest of the EU, they never ask ID from people with British credit cards/passports - so I literally never get asked for ID anywhere... Almost forgotten what it feels like.)

    Otherwise Russia seems quite relaxed - not hassling people unnecessarily or making a big stink out of minor laws. Good!

  11. #11
    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Other Universe
    Posts
    8,501
    Rep Power
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Hanna View Post
    I understand that it's common in Russia to get asked for it. Is that right? Is there any particular situations where Russia is extra (unexpectedly strict about ID? What would I have to show them - my passport only, or ID card? Do I have to carry it on me when I walk around in town?
    I don't even remember when I had to show my documents to anyone but traffic police. If you drive a car you can be stopped for document's check - that's normal and that's expected. But if you don't look suspicious I doubt you'll ever have to show your documents.

    If you're a foreigner it is expected to show your passport with an open visa.
    Send me a PM if you need me.

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай mishau_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ордынская Московия
    Posts
    2,451
    Rep Power
    12
    К работнику ГАИ теперь нужно будет обращаться Патрульный Инспектор Дорожного Регулирования или сокращенно (даже боюсь писать). Интересная также аббревиатура у Железнодорожного Отделения Полиции.
    English Edition

    В обычных странах церковь отделена от государства, а в России - от Бога.

  13. #13
    Почтенный гражданин Demonic_Duck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    304
    Rep Power
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Hanna View Post
    Saying "Officer" to policemen is American usage. It's not normal in Britain. An American friend of mine did it here in the UK a while back and the policeman loved it.... Usually people are not that respectful. No particular form of address is needed (and I think it's the same in France; only "Monsieur", same as you would use with anyone.)
    This is true, there's no specific way to address a policeman in England, just use normal polite speech... some people can't even manage this, although of course being blatantly disrespectful might land you on the wrong side of the law even if you were on the right side to start with! I remember one time when I accidentally swore in front of a policewoman... although actually she might have just been a Community Support Officer. CSOs are basically civilians dressed up to look a bit like police officers. They don't have any real powers, but I suppose the advantage is they're cheaper than actually hiring more police.

    For more information, watch this:
    Демоническая Утка
    Носитель английского языка, учу русский язык.
    Пожалуйста, исправьте мои сообщения!

  14. #14
    Почтенный гражданин Dmitry Khomichuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Belarus, Hero-Fortress
    Posts
    308
    Rep Power
    11
    Are policemen only officers?
    For example, in Belarus street patrols (they are going by foot) have no officers. Only road patrols have or consist of officers.

    Using of "Гражданин/товарищ милиционер/сержант/капитан, etc." is obsolete and "канцелярщина" (how to say it in English?). Usually if you are asking something at the street you should use something like "Здравствуйте/Извините, не могли бы Вы сказать ..." (the same way as with other people ). And when militiaman starts the conversation he introduces himself, something like "Здравствуйте, я - лейтенант милиции, Иванов Иван Иванович, ваш участковый", and then you can use no name or "Иван Иванович", when you speak with him.

    And when he doesn't introduce, even he is in uniform, you should consider that he is not a militiaman.
    For example, real story. If you see any person in uniform trying to catch you or something similar without introduction and showing documents you can resist. So, the real story: My friend, he is a boxer, was walking through the street and suddenly he heard "Catch him !", two persons were running towards him. And one of them tried to catch him. Just tried... Than other introduced, and asked to forgive his mate, because they are catching prisoner and his mate hurried. (If my friend sued than militiaman could lose his work).

    My intuition says to me, that I made terrible amount of mistakes. So, please, correct them.

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mowcow, Russia
    Posts
    1,957
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Khomitchuk View Post
    Are policemen only officers?
    "Officer" is not the same as "офицер". In the USA, the word "officer" is often used as a synonym of "policeman."

  16. #16
    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA пляж
    Posts
    648
    Rep Power
    10
    "Officer" for the most part in the USA. Unless it's a Sheriff's Deputy, some get upset when they are called "Officer". Texas Rangers want to be called "Ranger". Massachusetts State Police want to be called "Trooper" (and don't you forget it!). "Sir" and "Yes Sir" will keep you from "falling down" if you get into trouble.

    Here's an article from The Moscow Times:

    Good Cop, Bad Cop 03 March 2011
    By Michele A. Berdy
    Полицейский: police officer
    Пришла весна и народ гуляет! (Spring is here, and folks are having fun!) Or: Ещё не пришла весна и народ с ума сходит! (Spring still isn’t here and folks are going nuts!) In any case, ребрендинг (rebranding) of милиция (militia) into полиция (police) has been народное творчество (public creativity) of the best kind. Reading the news is like a night at a comedy club.
    It all started with an article on how the public should address the newly named cops. A language expert admitted that he didn’t have any idea. Theoretically, we should politely call a cop господин полицейский (Mr. Policeman), but he said: Статус нашей бывшей милиции, а теперь полиции как-то очень плохо вяжется со статусом слова “господин” (The status of our former militia and now police for some reason really doesn’t fit the status implied by the word “mister”).
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  17. #17
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22
    Dmitry Khomitchuk is right. There's no need to use overly formal (and somewhat ridiculous) forms of address like "Comrade militioner". It's common to address Russian policemen the same as any other passerby, so if you need help or want to ask a question it's perfectly fine to approach them with polite "Вы". For example "Извините, вы не подскажете как пройти к ...?" If you know their names or ranks you may use them, but it's not obligatory.

  18. #18
    Завсегдатай mishau_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ордынская Московия
    Posts
    2,451
    Rep Power
    12
    Мне кажется "Товарищ полицейский" звучало бы классно.
    English Edition

    В обычных странах церковь отделена от государства, а в России - от Бога.

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай Basil77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Moscow reg.
    Posts
    2,549
    Rep Power
    16
    Глава правительства Владимир Путин, общаясь с журналистами, очень удивился вопросу о необычных аббревиатурах в новой российской полиции.
    Автор вопроса сообщила премьеру о том, что в блогосфере возникли весьма неблагозвучные сокращения, которые якобы появятся в органах внутренних дел: полицейский инспектор защиты детства и юношества (ПИЗДЮн), полицейский инспектор дорожного регулирования (ПИДР), государственная единая инспекция (ГЕИ).
    В ответ премьер назвал подобные переименования "необычными", но подчеркнул, что дело не в названии, а в результатах работы.
    По его словам, реформа МВД предполагает структурные изменения, тогда как многие подразделения остаются в прежнем виде. Результаты изменений, по мнению В.Путина, оценит общество.
    Добавим, что вышеупомянутые аббревиатуры несколько недель гуляли по блогосфере и являлись шуточной реакцией острословов на реформу милиции. Однако в шутку поверили очень многие. Как сообщают СМИ, даже глава ГУВД Москвы В.Колокольцев вынужден был объяснять своим подчиненным, что ПИДРов в полиции не будет.


    В.Путин удивился вопросу о ПИДРах в полиции :: Политика :: Top.rbc.ru
    Please, correct my mistakes, except for the cases I misspell something on purpose!

  20. #20
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    16

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. E-Mail address not accepted
    By bitpicker in forum Tech Support and Site Comments
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May 23rd, 2009, 06:44 AM
  2. Isn't Europe a country?
    By Triton in forum Fun Stuff
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: February 24th, 2008, 11:13 AM
  3. Mailing/postal address international
    By capecoddah in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: March 25th, 2006, 03:18 AM
  4. translation for an address?
    By ChrisC30 in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: August 21st, 2005, 09:33 PM
  5. The Gettysburg Address, please help
    By The_lamb in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: June 20th, 2005, 11:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary