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Thread: Kalabalik

  1. #1
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    Kalabalik

    This is a word which in Swedish means "Disorder". Does anyone know when it was imported from Turkey?
    Листьев не обожгло, Веток не обломало
    День промыт как стекло, только этого мало

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    Re: Kalabalik

    Quote Originally Posted by Zhenya
    This is a word which in Swedish means "Disorder". Does anyone know when it was imported from Turkey?
    I don't know when it's imported from Turkey. In Turkish it simply means crowded, which implies lack of order. Also the i in this word should not have a dot. It's pronounced калабалык.

    На турецком языке:
    iİ: И
    ıI: Ы

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    Thx very interesting to know.
    Листьев не обожгло, Веток не обломало
    День промыт как стекло, только этого мало

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    The word came to Sweden in the 1710's. After the defeat at Poltava, Charles XII and a handfull of troops made their way to the town of Bender, in the Ottoman Empire, in what is modern-day Moldavia. There, they were given shelter for quite some time, while Charles tried to persuade the Ottomans to join him in his war against Russia. However, through a series of events, local Ottoman officials grew weary of the Swedes' presence in Bender, and attempted to arrest Charles and his followers. The resulting clash is known in Swedish as "Kalabaliken i Bender", or the "The Kalabalik in Bender". After this, the king made his way back to Swedish territory in northern Germany, as did some Turkish customs, cuisine, and language. Probably this importing was not a conscious effort on the Swedish part, but rather that of the many creditors and servants who accompanied their Swedish clients back to Sweden.

    So now, us Swedes say "kalabalik" and eat "k

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    Thanks for sharing swmtb, but I must ask you, how on earth do you know this? Did you look it up or do you simply know everything?
    blame Canada

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamion
    Thanks for sharing swmtb, but I must ask you, how on earth do you know this? Did you look it up or do you simply know everything?
    You're welcome. I do not know everything, however, Swedish/Baltic history is one of my interests, so I have read a great deal on the subject.

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  8. #8
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    hhhmm...funny.. in turkish the word "Kalabalık" means "crowd, crowded"
    •••♥♥♥•••
    Lonely attics

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