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Thread: Herr Bergs translation service

  1. #1
    Mihkkal
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    Herr Bergs translation service

    Если кто-нибудь, случайно, захочет иметь какое-то предложение или слово, переведенное на или из норвежского (и у которого не было ситуации, когда они отчаянно нуждаются в знании норвежца), я к вашим услугам.

    Если у вас будет интерес к грамматике, я сделаю все возможное, чтобы ответить и объяснить. Но я не очень хорошо разбираюсь в грамматиках своего языка.
    Last edited by MasterAdmin; January 5th, 2018 at 12:57 PM.

  2. #2
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    hehehee, my grandma and grandpa are from norway and their last name is "Berg" too

  3. #3
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    Norwegians use the word "Herr" too?

  4. #4
    Mihkkal
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    "Berg" is hardly uncommon, I think it's actually on the Top Ten of Norwegian surnames. The word means "mountain", "rock", "cliff" (not all that surprising for people who know German), mostly the last two words. I think that, historically, it can also mean "hill" or "mound", but I'm not sure.

    "Herr" is traditionally used in Norway, yes, but today it sounds awfully formal and therefore old-fashioned. Norwegian is a language which has more or less discarded all its honorifics and polite forms. F.ex: The Norwegian equivalent of Russian "Vy" ("De") isn't used on anyone but the King, who is still adressed and spoken to as "Deres majestet"/"Your majesty" or simply "the King"/"Kongen".

    Likewise it is uncommon to actually use Herr (mostly shortened to "Hr." when written) or the other polite forms Fru (married woman) and Froeken (unmarried woman). It sounds exteremely formal, and therefore somewhat ironic or silly.

  5. #5
    Mihkkal
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    Where in the country are your GP-s from, then, dogboy?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mihkkal
    "Berg" is hardly uncommon, I think it's actually on the Top Ten of Norwegian surnames. The word means "mountain", "rock", "cliff" (not all that surprising for people who know German), mostly the last two words. I think that, historically, it can also mean "hill" or "mound", but I'm not sure.

    "Herr" is traditionally used in Norway, yes, but today it sounds awfully formal and therefore old-fashioned. Norwegian is a language which has more or less discarded all its honorifics and polite forms. F.ex: The Norwegian equivalent of Russian "Vy" ("De") isn't used on anyone but the King, who is still adressed and spoken to as "Deres majestet"/"Your majesty" or simply "the King"/"Kongen".

    Likewise it is uncommon to actually use Herr (mostly shortened to "Hr." when written) or the other polite forms Fru (married woman) and Froeken (unmarried woman). It sounds exteremely formal, and therefore somewhat ironic or silly.
    What do they say then? Simply the last name?

  7. #7
    Mihkkal
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    Basically, yeah.

    When speaking about, say for example the Prime Minister (Imja/Fornavn: Kjell-Magne, Familija/Etternavn: Bondevik) one would say simply "Statsministeren" (the Prime Minister) or "Bondevik". Or just the fornavn, of course, but that would be informal. Maybe I would use one of the countless mock-names, though that can't really be concidered formal
    These rules also aply to journalists, fishers, industrial workers, whatever.... Being formal, you use profession or etternavn.

    When speaking to people, it's simply "Du" (Ty). "De" (Vy) sounds simply very oldfashioned. This applies to everyone, up to and including the prime minister and the richest capitalists. We have no nobles but the royal familiy, but they - the King, the Prince/ess Regent (Kronprinse/sse/n) and possibly the Queen (Dronningen) are adressed with their profession.

    I can imagine that it is theoretically possible to adress the prime-minister as "Statsministeren" or their editor/employer as "Direktoer", but to me this sounds like something only very old and conservative people would do.

    So "Herr"/"Fru"/"Froeken" is never used in spoken Norwegian, except to amuse or to be ironical. (Or, possibly, by very old people).

    When you're writing formally about people, you use their etternavn or their full name. Pinning that extra "Hr." on sounds really strange to me.

  8. #8
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    blame Canada

  9. #9
    Mihkkal
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    Scandinavian is basically one language, though with four different football teams
    The differences are more or less dialectal, so yep I understand you. I don't know if Swedes understand Norwegian as well as Norwegians understand Swedish, though.... A friend of mine lives in Stockholm, and she says she often has to use English to be understood (but then again she speaks North Norwegian).

    Do you understand Norsk?

    Vinne over de norske alpinistene? Da st

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    Do you understand Norsk?
    Ja, det g
    blame Canada

  11. #11
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    Det l

  12. #12
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    Hm, I guess that depends on who is telling the story. Here in Sweden you are cosidered to be the singing people, whereas the danes talk like porridge filled frogs (no offense ). Of course this just shows our prejudices.
    blame Canada

  13. #13
    Dov
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    Now I know about addressing people in Norwegian, pretty cool!
    Just one question though what is the difference between “Du” and “Deg”?
    ...and sorry about the post being so long since the last post, I just stumble across it when I was surfing the web and was wondering what the answer was...

  14. #14
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
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    The difference between "du" and "deg" is like in English "he" and "him", i.e. to do with the nominative case versus the accusative

    I love you
    Jeg elsker deg

    You love me
    Du elsker meg

    Du is nominative
    Deg is accusative
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

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    I'd better be learning that by heart.
    Jeg elsker deg, jeg elsker deg, jeg elsker deg, jeg elsker deg...

    Takk, kalinka_vinnie!
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  16. #16
    Dov
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    Thank you, Спасибо og takk for hjelpen!

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