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Thread: English verbs and prepositions

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    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
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    English verbs and prepositions

    Usually the preposition in combination with the verb may alter the meaning significantly.

    Offhand examples:
    to look vs to look forward
    to go vs to go on.

    Is there some resource where I could read about the usage of prepositions. Some online dictionary or something?
    Send me a PM if you need me.

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    Старший оракул
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    Once, I asked this question. Look at:this

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    I have a list of over 300 constructions with prepositions (that is verb + prep, noun + prep, adj + prep), I had to learn it all by heart for uni.
    I could scan some for you, if you'd like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    I have a list of over 300 constructions with prepositions (that is verb + prep, noun + prep, adj + prep), I had to learn it all by heart for uni.
    I could scan some for you, if you'd like that.
    I would like to get the list too... If it's not problematic for you, you may send it to my e-mail (look below)

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    ok, I"ll try to get it scanned as soon as possible.
    Sorry I'm not going to rewrite it on the comp, but it'd take ages. Some of the pages are handwritten by me, but I believe it is readable, and the others are copied from some books.
    could I get your e-mail or sth so I could send it your way?

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    Завсегдатай Ramil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    I have a list of over 300 constructions with prepositions (that is verb + prep, noun + prep, adj + prep), I had to learn it all by heart for uni.
    I could scan some for you, if you'd like that.
    Yes I'd really appreciate that.
    Send me a PM if you need me.

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    ok, here it is:
    http://rapidshare.de/files/18334874/eng.zip.html

    I zipped the scans and put it on rapidshare.de for you to download. I hope the handwritten parts are readable. Unfortunatley, the only translation I've ever put there is to my native language, but I believe you should find all of the phrasals on the dictionary.com or wherever else.

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    Re: English verbs and prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by Ramil
    Usually the preposition in combination with the verb may alter the meaning significantly.

    Offhand examples:
    to look vs to look forward
    to go vs to go on.

    Is there some resource where I could read about the usage of prepositions. Some online dictionary or something?
    I do not think that the word "forward" is a preposition.
    Какая разница, умереть богатым или бедным?

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    Re: English verbs and prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    I do not think that the word "forward" is a preposition.
    What if I said that I am forward of the helm?
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

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    Re: English verbs and prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackMage
    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    I do not think that the word "forward" is a preposition.
    What if I said that I am forward of the helm?
    In your sentence "forward" is the direct object - i.e. a noun.
    I - subject (noun)
    am - verb
    forward - direct object (noun)
    of - preposition
    the - article
    helm - prepositional object (noun)

    Maybe if you said "I am forward the helm" but this does not sound right.
    Какая разница, умереть богатым или бедным?

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    Well, I tried.
    Corrupting young minds since May 6, 2004.

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    Re: English verbs and prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackMage
    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    I do not think that the word "forward" is a preposition.
    forward - direct object (noun)
    a noun? I'd say in this context it's more like an adj
    I thought 'forward' as a noun can only occur in the meaning of, like an attacking player in sports.

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    Re: English verbs and prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kamka
    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackMage
    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    I do not think that the word "forward" is a preposition.
    forward - direct object (noun)
    a noun? I'd say in this context it's more like an adj
    I thought 'forward' as a noun can only occur in the meaning of, like an attacking player in sports.
    "a forward" can be a player of a team.
    But when forward is used as a direction, it is also a noun - example "He went forward" or "I am looking forward"
    You can also use it as a verb "He fowarded the letter to his sister."
    It can also be used as an adverb "The forward moving car ..."
    It can also be used as an adjective "The forward person ..."

    But I don't think it can be used as a preposition.
    "I am looking forward the graduation" - sounds too weird.
    Какая разница, умереть богатым или бедным?

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    Re: English verbs and prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kwatts59
    ...

    But I don't think it can be used as a preposition.
    "I am looking forward the graduation" - sounds too weird.
    It does sound weird because actually it should be "I'm looking forward to the graduation", which has a different meaning.
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    Kwatts + English grammar = Iran + Nuclear weapons

    In "I am looking forward" 'forward' is an adverb, since it tells us something about the manner of the verb.

    Forward is a direction in this case so therefore cannot be the direct object. If Look takes a direct object it will be "look at".

    You can't say - "I look John".

    "He is looking"
    "WHERE is he looking?"
    "He is looking forward"

    A noun (direct object) would answer the "WHAT is he looking it" question.

    This, of course is the literal meaning of "to look forward"

    Forward can have other functions, as mention, such as in the verb "to forward [a letter]"

    However Mr. Kwatts was right about forward not being a preposition.

    There is a proper name for these types of contstructions in English (look up, look out, fill out, fill in, play on, play out etc.), but I forgot it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    In "I am looking forward" 'forward' is an adverb, since it tells us something about the manner of the verb.

    Forward is a direction in this case so therefore cannot be the direct object. If Look takes a direct object it will be "look at".

    You can't say - "I look John".

    "He is looking"
    "WHERE is he looking?"
    "He is looking forward"

    A noun (direct object) would answer the "WHAT is he looking it" question.
    I think it depends on context
    North is a noun, northerly is an adverb

    NOUN
    I am going north.
    I am going forward.
    I am going backward.
    I am facing north
    I am facing forward.
    I am looking forward.
    I am forward of the helm

    ADVERB
    I am going in a northerly direction.
    I am going in a forward direction.
    I am looking forward to the party.
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    English grammar is so complicated in that question.
    Take your shoes off
    Take off your shoes
    Could you tell me what off is in those examples - preposition or adverb.
    (I'm looking forward to understanding that cr*p)

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    Quote Originally Posted by TATY
    There is a proper name for these types of contstructions in English (look up, look out, fill out, fill in, play on, play out etc.), but I forgot it.
    aren't those phrasal verbs???

    Chuvak, I'd go for preposition, but I'm not an authority on this one.

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    Sorry guys, I was wrong

    "forward" is an adverb
    "forth" is the noun form of "forward"

    I am going north
    I am going forth

    I am going northerly
    I am going forward

    The "-ward" extension converts it to an adverb.
    This extension can be added to other directions to convert them to adverbs - back/backward, up/upwards etc.
    Какая разница, умереть богатым или бедным?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuvak
    English grammar is so complicated in that question.
    Take your shoes off
    Take off your shoes
    Could you tell me what off is in those examples - preposition or adverb.
    (I'm looking forward to understanding that cr*p)
    I think the first is a preposition and the second is an adverb. Could be wrong.
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