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Thread: Cry, shout, yell, scream, shriek.

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    Почтенный гражданин delog's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Cry, shout, yell, scream, shriek.

    I can't figure out a difference between the words cry, shout, yell, scream and shriek. Are there any?

    I guess that "to shriek" is sudden action for those who didn't expected that (she shrieked out a warning just in time), "to cry" as a result of pain or disappointment, "to shout" is deliberate act (to shout at somebody), "to yell" is used when somebody get a fright, "to scream" is a wilful action for getting attention. Am I right?
    English as a Second Language by Jeff McQuillan and Lucy Tse.

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    Завсегдатай Crocodile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by delog View Post
    I can't figure out a difference between the words cry, shout, yell, scream and shriek. Are there any?

    I guess that "to shriek" is sudden action for those who didn't expected that (she shrieked out a warning just in time), "to cry" as a result of pain or disappointment, "to shout" is deliberate act (to shout at somebody), "to yell" is used when somebody get a fright, "to scream" is a wilful action for getting attention. Am I right?
    I would suggest the following translation:

    to shriek = визгливо кричать, визжать
    to cry = громко звать или плакать
    to shout = прокричать
    to yell = накричать
    to scream = кричать/раскричаться

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    Почтенный гражданин bitpicker's Avatar
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    The words are not completely separate, it depends on context which to choose.

    "Shout" and "yell" both mean "to call out loud", and I would say that yelling is possibly louder and shorter than shouting. You do either in order to be heard, when a normal level of speech is not sufficient. You can also shout and yell in anger, and I would say the yeller is angrier.

    You cry out in surprise or pain, you can also cry in order to be heard, but it implies urgency or danger.

    Screaming implies more fear than crying, and it is also used when many people make a lot of noise in panic and so on.

    Shrieking is a short high-pitched outburst of terror. You rarely shriek something which can be understood, it's just a sound of utmost alarm.
    Спасибо за исправления!

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    Почтенный гражданин delog's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Thank you guys.
    Quote Originally Posted by Crocodile
    to shout = прокричать
    to yell = накричать
    According to bitpicker's explanation, I think it would be better to translate these words as:

    to shout = (на/про/_)кричать
    to yell = (на/про/_)орать

    What do you think?
    English as a Second Language by Jeff McQuillan and Lucy Tse.

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    Завсегдатай Crocodile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by delog View Post
    What do you think?
    Sounds good.

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    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
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    You often see "cried" after dialogue; in this case it doesn't express pain, rather an elevated emotional state.

    "Liz has asked us to house-sit for her this summer!" cried my wife excitedly.
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

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