Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: offensive words

  1. #1
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    612
    Rep Power
    11

    offensive words

    I hope it's ok of me to ask such question concerning the usage of offensive words that I have come across. The matter that makes me wonder is just HOW offensive they're found and what's the difference in meaning. The Longman dictionary, although I do love him dearly, gives the very same explanation for each and every one of them "used to describe a man who is considered stupid, or not nice. offensive. do not use this word blah blah blah"
    Then I turn on the telly, and it seems it's not THAT offensive after all.

    jacka*s
    d*ck
    pu*z
    a*shole
    j*rk
    son of a b*tch

    these are the main ones that make me wonder, but I bet there's thousand (at least!) I missed.

    I apologize in advance if someone finds this subject offensive, but I really do believe this aspect is just as important in learning a forgein language as any other. And yet, it's not taught at schools or universities.

  2. #2
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Invalid City!
    Posts
    1,352
    Rep Power
    12
    It depends.

    If you describe somone as such, you may not offend the person to whom you are talking.

    However, if the person about whom you were talking heard you, or if you addressed them directly with one of those terms, you'd receive a well-deserved slap.

  3. #3
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    612
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by scotcher
    It depends.

    If you describe somone as such, you may not offend the person to whom you are talking.

    However, if the person about whom you were talking heard you, or if you addressed them directly with one of those terms, you'd receive a well-deserved slap.
    ouch.
    are all of these equally offensive? I know television is not the best source of knowledge, but since I haven't had a chance to go to an English speaking country, I do, in a way, depend on it when it comes to some cultural learnings. I've noticed "j*rk" and "jacka*s" are frequently used directly towards someone who doesn't seem very offended (most common example "You can be such a j*rk at times, Johnny/Peter/Jimmy" )

    and also... is "p*tz" pretty much the same in meaning as "wuss"? Perhaps more offensive though?

  4. #4
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,216
    Rep Power
    13
    They're all of about the same I'd say except for "jerk" which is less offensive, but it depends more on the tone of voice and situation.

    People often call each other by these names in a joking manner or a way not intended to cause offense, but if said maliciously then it could piss someone off quite a bit. It depends on context.

  5. #5
    DDT
    DDT is offline
    Завсегдатай DDT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    I have given up the Gambling, the Wine and the Cows!.. I'm back now! ....nope Im gone again!
    Posts
    3,364
    Rep Power
    14
    Oh swear words and bad language and мать .....my favorite!!

    These are obviously American so I will tell you how they are looked at here.

    Jerk, jackass and Putz.
    These words are not considered any more offensive than Дурак. They are commonly heard on family time television in USA. They are not "swear words". But do not call your boss these words unless you are friends.

    Dick.
    Is in a class of it's own. It is not really a swear word. It is actually a man's name, a short version of Richard. But it can also be a rather beguine word for penis. You can say it in semi polite company.

    Son of a bitch
    Not particularly offensive. I think that you will hear this on television after family time is over. There was a time when you would never hear bitch on tv but these days things are different.
    Bitch is simply the correct name for a female dog therefore it is quite OK to use this word in that fashion. Son of a bitch is the same as saying that someone's mother is a dog. You be the judge of who you want to say this to.
    Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to talk, think and act for myself. - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

  6. #6
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    612
    Rep Power
    11
    thank you all very much

  7. #7
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Нью-Йорк
    Posts
    140
    Rep Power
    8
    I know I'm very late to this conversation, but I love this forum so much! And it's helped me so much over the past couple of years. So...

    Let's start off by saying, depending on who your friends are, you can jokingly call someone any of these words.

    jacka*s

    Also means donkey (the animal). I wouldn't call someone that unless you are good friends and are joking around. Used quite commonly, especially on TV. Actually, it's used a lot in the movies SHREK.

    d*ck

    Also a man's penis.

    pu*z

    Putz is not a bad word at all, to me. I wouldn't call someone a putz seriously. But any Yiddish-like word (anything that ends in tz, for example) is going to get more laughs than anything. It's just a funny sounding word.

    a*shole

    Also a part of anatomy. I would say that, in serious context, it's the strongest of all these words. But, again, you can use it jokingly with a friend.

    j*rk

    Pretty similar to dick in its usage (though it has nothing to do with the male anatomy).

    son of a b*tch

    This is also used as an excalmation. If someone almost runs you over with a bike you can shout out YOU SON OF A BITCH! or just SON OF A BITCH! Sometimes it is written SONNUVABITCH.


    I feel safe saying that the most vulgar and dangerous words to use in English are slang terms for female genitalia. I can think of two extreme words that send people into a frenzy - both four-letter words with hard consonant sounds.

  8. #8
    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA пляж
    Posts
    648
    Rep Power
    10
    Son of a bitch... сукин сын
    Can't be that bad, it's in the dictionary. Watch the movie "Patton",

    Translator: The general would like to know if you will drink a toast with him.
    Patton: Thank the general and tell him I have no desire to drink with him or any other Russian son of a bitch.
    Translator: [Nervous] I can't tell him that!
    Patton: Tell him, every word.
    Translator: [In Russian] He says he will not drink with you or any Russian son of a bitch.
    Russian general: [In Russian] Tell him he is a son of a bitch, too. Now!
    Translator: [Very nervous] He says he thinks you are a son of a bitch, too.
    Patton: [Laughing] All right. All right, tell him I'll drink to that; one son of a bitch to another.
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  9. #9
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Satellite of Love
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: offensive words

    Quote Originally Posted by kamka

    jacka*s
    d*ck
    pu*z
    a*shole
    j*rk
    son of a b*tch
    Some words are considered to be profanity, and others are not.

    For example, "jackass" and "jerk" are not profanity, in fact, they are barely offensive even if you tried really hard.

    "Putz" is yiddish for the male genital organ, but it is not well-known and therefore is not offensive unless you know yiddish. The same goes for "shmuck".

    The others are profanity, but are not especially shocking except in formal or polite situations.

    I just thought I'd add this:

    "Bloody" is not profanity in the United States, but is in Great Britain, although I'm not sure that it is considered offensive anymore. Probably about the same as "damned". Pretty mild, in other words.

    Another is "crap" which means "excrement". In the States, it's considered a mild alternative to the 'S'-word, but, in Britain, I believe that it sounds a bit more offensive.

    Britain also has a number of "bad words" that are not widely used in the States, and probably vice versa. There are any number of websites that list these, and other uniquely British words.
    "Сейчас без языка нельзя... из тебя шапку сделают..."
    Cogito Ergo Doleo

  10. #10
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    286
    Rep Power
    9

    Re: offensive words

    Quote Originally Posted by Matroskin Kot
    Another is "cr@p" which means "excrement". In the States, it's considered a mild alternative to the 'S'-word, but, in Britain, I believe that it sounds a bit more offensive.
    Really??? Uh-oh. Then I probably shouldn't have used it in Wales. I thought it would be less offensive than "s**t" and pretty much OK to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    I feel safe saying that the most vulgar and dangerous words to use in English are slang terms for female genitalia. I can think of two extreme words that send people into a frenzy - both four-letter words with hard consonant sounds.
    OK, I know "c**t", but what is the second one?

  11. #11
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Нью-Йорк
    Posts
    140
    Rep Power
    8
    Well, the example is PYGMALION, by Shaw. "Walk? Not bloody likely!"

    kt_81: the other word is t-w-a-t.

    Which, in slight pronunciation only, means "roof" in French. (That's very slight, by the way!)

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    5,076
    Rep Power
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    kt_81: the other word is t-w-a-t.
    So you mean it's VERY offensive? 0_0

    I've read more than one book where 30% of what the characters said to each other was 'twat', 'tosser', 'poofter', etc. I kinda thought all these 'terms' were rather mild.

    Thanks for the warning. After your post I begin to suspect that at least half of my vocabulary cosists of improper words and I have to learn English again.

  13. #13
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    286
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    kt_81: the other word is t-w-a-t.
    So you mean it's VERY offensive? 0_0
    . I had no idea either.

  14. #14
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    My Time & Space
    Posts
    6,559
    Rep Power
    16
    T... What?!
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  15. #15
    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA пляж
    Posts
    648
    Rep Power
    10
    All depends who you may be talking with....
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...mBBC%20Article deals with swearing at work
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  16. #16
    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA пляж
    Posts
    648
    Rep Power
    10
    All depends who you may be talking with. [url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/norfolk/7047536.stmBBC Article[/url]
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  17. #17
    Почтенный гражданин capecoddah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA пляж
    Posts
    648
    Rep Power
    10
    All depends who you may be talking with. BBC Article that talks about swearing at work relieving stress. I say спасибо сука to my boss to the amusement of the maids. She thinks it means "Thank you boss"...

    Don't swear in front of customers (Holy Cow! Gee Whiz! Son of a gun!) or the person that writes your paycheck (unless he/she is cool). Be nice to overly religious and sensitive types too. I still haven't learned MY favorite phrase to descibe customers at the motel in Russian "What a F@(king moron".

    But that's just me.
    I'm easily amused late at night...

  18. #18
    Почётный участник
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Нью-Йорк
    Posts
    140
    Rep Power
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    kt_81: the other word is t-w-a-t.
    So you mean it's VERY offensive? 0_0

    I've read more than one book where 30% of what the characters said to each other was 'twat', 'tosser', 'poofter', etc. I kinda thought all these 'terms' were rather mild.

    Thanks for the warning. After your post I begin to suspect that at least half of my vocabulary cosists of improper words and I have to learn English again.
    Sounds like an English book you were reading? Maybe it is more offensive here in the States. I actually love that word - I think it sounds hilarious.

    But tosser and poofter have very little meaning in the states.

    I am still waiting for "Well, golly!" to make a come back!

  19. #19
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30
    Rep Power
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    Well, the example is PYGMALION, by Shaw. "Walk? Not bloody likely!"

    kt_81: the other word is t-w-a-t.

    Which, in slight pronunciation only, means "roof" in French. (That's very slight, by the way!)
    Actually, t-w-a-t isn't that offensive. The C word on the other hand...oh yeah! LOL. Then there's the P word, which is often as bad as the C. Except if you're using it to refer to a cat. Like pussy cat.

    Did I say that?

  20. #20
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30
    Rep Power
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    Quote Originally Posted by gRomoZeka
    Quote Originally Posted by ZelyeUrsuli
    kt_81: the other word is t-w-a-t.
    So you mean it's VERY offensive? 0_0

    I've read more than one book where 30% of what the characters said to each other was 'twat', 'tosser', 'poofter', etc. I kinda thought all these 'terms' were rather mild.

    Thanks for the warning. After your post I begin to suspect that at least half of my vocabulary cosists of improper words and I have to learn English again.
    Sounds like an English book you were reading? Maybe it is more offensive here in the States. I actually love that word - I think it sounds hilarious.

    But tosser and poofter have very little meaning in the states.

    I am still waiting for "Well, golly!" to make a come back!
    ROFLMAOx2

    How do I give you points for this? Because that's a +4 if ever I saw one.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Fun with words
    By BabaYaga in forum Fun Stuff
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: October 3rd, 2007, 07:21 AM
  2. Those little words...
    By Delichon in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: March 11th, 2007, 12:59 AM
  3. 2 Words
    By Darobat in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 4th, 2005, 03:27 PM
  4. A few words
    By kwatts59 in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: June 27th, 2005, 10:24 PM
  5. Any Russian words spelled like English words???
    By rusdave in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: March 30th, 2005, 05:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary