Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: What does Sergeew mean??

  1. #1
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    10

    What does Sergeew mean??

    hi I would like it very much if some could tell me what Sergeew means.
    I belive that the russian spelling is Serghiew.... I am not sure but I will find out the proper spelling later
    Thank you

  2. #2
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Posts
    1,437
    Rep Power
    12
    Сергеев (Sergeyev) - this is a last name that derived from the first name Сергей.
    "Happy new year, happy new year
    May we all have a vision now and then
    Of a world where every neighbour is a friend"

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sunnyvale, Cali
    Posts
    5,771
    Rep Power
    15
    I think last names that comes from first names means that at one point, you ancestors were serfs to some guy called Sergey, and when the goverment required that everybody had first names and last names (they usually only had first names), they chose the name of their master... or at least so I have been taught.
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

  4. #4
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    479
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    I think last names that comes from first names means that at one point, you ancestors were serfs to some guy called Sergey, and when the goverment required that everybody had first names and last names (they usually only had first names), they chose the name of their master... or at least so I have been taught.
    Oh, I believe it was just a development of the patronymic. In old times, common people prononse patronymics different way: instead of "Sergeevich" or "Ivanovich" they said "Sergeev" and "Ivanov". As you can see, it sounds exactly like this kind of family names.

    You can read this in some historic novels. For example, person introduces himself as "Ivan Petrov Ivanov". In our time his name would be "Ivan Petrovich Ivanov". So the name "Sergeev" tell as, that this family descends from some ancient Sergei.

    In the other hand, there are a lot of common folks descend from peasant, who have aristocratic names. In this case, they did, actually, took their names from their masters.
    Find your inner Bart!

  5. #5
    Увлечённый спикер
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Siberia
    Posts
    46
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    I think last names that comes from first names means that at one point, you ancestors were serfs to some guy called Sergey, and when the goverment required that everybody had first names and last names (they usually only had first names), they chose the name of their master... or at least so I have been taught.
    Last names derived from Christian names are said to have been given to baptized Mari.

    Yeah, Иванов, Петров, Сидоров too.
    The above may contain Siberian words, idioms, usages, and ideas. Take care.

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Чапелхилловка, NC USA
    Posts
    1,987
    Rep Power
    16
    Иванов and Сергеев are short-form adjectives. So a guy named Иванов would be Johnson (i.e, John's +son) if born a bit further West.

    ср. Иванов день.
    http://mirslovarei.com/content_etn/Ivanov-Den-195.html

  7. #7
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    5
    Rep Power
    10
    Thank you alot for your help

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary