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Thread: The word "sacrifice"

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай Antonio1986's Avatar
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    The word "sacrifice"

    Privet.
    Google translate when I enter the word "sacrifice" translates to жертва.
    But in the context of the expression: "Sucess requires many sacrificies" I think is not the correct word.
    This question was inspired by Martin Luther King's speech: "Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle".

  2. #2
    Почтенный гражданин pushvv's Avatar
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    It is correct.

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай Antonio1986's Avatar
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    Privet pushvv.
    So you are telling me that: "успех требует многих жертв" is correct?

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    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
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    Чтобы добиться успеха в каком-то деле, приходится иногда пожертвовать сном, временем, удовольствиями.

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    Властелин iCake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antonio1986 View Post
    Privet pushvv.
    So you are telling me that: "успех требует многих жертв" is correct?
    That's alright. It's definitely not used in the sense of victim there. Also there is a famous phrase like that:

    Красота требует жертв
    I do not claim that my opinion is absolutely true.
    If you've spotted any mistake in my English, please, correct it. I want to be aware of any mistakes to efficiently eliminate them before they become a habit.

  6. #6
    Старший оракул
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antonio1986 View Post
    Privet pushvv.
    So you are telling me that: "успех требует многих жертв" is correct?
    Although your version is not wrong

    The word "жертва" in Russian can mean both "victim" and "sacrifice".

    The logic is the following:

    When someone suffers of something, then he/she is "жертва" (victim).
    When you suffer by abandoning some benefits in order to achieve something else, the thing you abandon is your "жертва" (sacrifice).
    Antonio1986 likes this.

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай Throbert McGee's Avatar
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    Antonio -- Although you probably won't use it very often, the word жрец -- "a priest in ancient paganism" -- comes from the same root as the verb (по)жертвовать, "to sacrifice." So, the жертва was the animal (or person!) tied up on the altar, and the жрец was THIS guy:



    P.S. However, священник is the correct word for "priest" in the modern sense, whether you mean Russian Orthodox, Catholic, Buddhist, etc.

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай Antonio1986's Avatar
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    Thanks Throbert.
    This is what I called an "illustrative" etymology.

  9. #9
    Старший оракул
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    Quote Originally Posted by Throbert McGee View Post
    the word жрец -- "a priest in ancient paganism" -- comes from the same root as the verb (по)жертвовать, "to sacrifice."
    Brilliant! I've never known "жрец" and "жертва" are etymologically related.
    But I checked wiktionary жрец — Викисловарь - you are right!

    Moreover, among others, this Indo-European root is also related to Latin grātēs мн. «благодарность» (gratefulness).

    It is logical since the Slavic "ж" sound often corresponds to the Indo-European "g" sound. Even in the modern English, "g" has two pronunciations: the "hard" one (as in "go") and the "soft" one (as in "gentle") (not in the Russian sense of hardness/softness). The "soft" English "g" is transcribed as "дж" in Russian, and the "soft" French "g" (as the second "g" in "garage") is pretty much like Russian "ж". So, "ж-р-т" and "g-r-t" roots do correspond.

    If the Latin grātēs is related to the Russian "жертва" - it means English "gratis, grateful, gratitude, gratuity" etc.) are also all cognates to "жрец, жертва, жертвовать".
    iCake likes this.

  10. #10
    Властелин
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    To Throbert, just FYI and to learn another interesting expression: there is an expression in Russian - жрица любви - euphemism for a 'prostitute'.

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