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Thread: short or long form adj.

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
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    short or long form adj.

    Why is the long form used in the second sentence?
    thanks

    Петр слишком умён, чтобы допустить такую ошибку.

    Петр, слишком умный, чтобы допустить такую ошибку, добился наконец своего.
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  2. #2
    Завсегдатай it-ogo's Avatar
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    Re: short or long form adj.

    Well, in most cases the short form of adj. is used as a predicate. In the first sentence adjective is a predicate while in the second one it is a part of attributive phrase. It's a formalistic nightmare! Better read and speak more and get an intuitive feeling - I believe it is much more easy then to learn all these horrible rules and exceptions.

    4. Г р а м м а т и ч е с к о е (синтаксическое) различие между обеими формами заключается в том, что краткая форма обладает способностью синтаксического управления, а полная в значении сказуемого такой способностью не обладает, например: он способен к музыке, мы готовы к отъезду, ребенок склонен к простуде, она была больна гриппом (употребление полной формы в этих примерах невозможно). Полная же форма обладает такой способностью, если употребляется в функции определения, например: ребенок, способный к музыке; дочь, больная гриппом и т. п.
    (http://www.spelling.spb.ru/rosenthal/alpha/r159.htm)
    "Россия для русских" - это неправильно. Остальные-то чем лучше?

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай sperk's Avatar
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    Re: short or long form adj.

    Quote Originally Posted by it-ogo
    Better read and speak more and get an intuitive feeling - I believe it is much more easy then to learn all these horrible rules and exceptions.
    sounds like good advice, thanks!
    Кому - нары, кому - Канары.

  4. #4
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    Re: short or long form adj.

    Quote Originally Posted by sperk
    Why is the long form used in the second sentence?
    thanks

    Петр слишком умён, чтобы допустить такую ошибку.

    Петр, слишком умный, чтобы допустить такую ошибку, добился наконец своего.
    In this concrete case, the meanings of the sentences are a bit different.
    The first one means "Pyotr is too clever...". The subject is "Pyotr", the predicate is "is". Very simple.
    The second one means "Pyotr, who is too clever, gained...". The subject is "Pyotr", the predicate is "gained", and there is the "who is too clever" part which is a specification for Pyotr's character. In Russian, this specification is always marked out with commas. The short form is never used in this case, at least if there is no "который" in the construction.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

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