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Thread: Help with Russian?

  1. #1
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    Help with Russian?

    I found out that in German, if someone says something like "Good luck(Viel Gluck)" and you want to say "Thanks, you too", that you use the dative, so you would say "Danke, dir auch"

    In Russian, is there something like this?

    So if someone said to me "Good luck(Удачи)" or "Have a nice day(Хорошего дня)" would I say:

    "Спасибо, ты тоже"
    or
    "Спасибо, тебе тоже"

    or am I doing something wrong? Any help is appreciated

    Thanks

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    Почтенный гражданин xXHoax's Avatar
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    Yeah, Russian follows the same logic as German, where the case system maintains throughout and across sentences and speakers. Meaning the reply is going to need the same case as the well-wish.
    The reply will match the necessary cases of a prior sentence, even if it omitted them.

    Удачи (тебе)!--
    -- И тебе (удачи)!

    Whereas if the first person used the nominative, the reply would be nominative as well,

    Будь ты аккуратно!--
    -- Ты тоже (будь аккуратно)!

    When it comes to phrases of well wishing and "impersonal statements", it's common to lack a nominative-subject. If there is a verb in the sentence, then there is a subject in the nominative (perhaps hidden) somewhere; however if a sentence doesnt have a specific verb then a nominative noun isn't quite necessary.
    "хорошего дня ты" - ты has no logical, or syntactic link in this sentence so it makes little to no sense.
    iCake likes this.
    "В тёмные времена хорошо видно светлых людей."
    - A quote, that only exists in Russian. Erich Maria Remarque

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    Ah ok, I understand now.

    So if someone said "Удачи" and I wanted to say "You too", I understand it's "И тебе". Would "тебе тоже" also make sense, or when speaking Russian is "и тебе" more common?

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    Властелин iCake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ashleigh View Post
    Ah ok, I understand now.

    So if someone said "Удачи" and I wanted to say "You too", I understand it's "И тебе". Would "тебе тоже" also make sense, or when speaking Russian is "и тебе" more common?
    There's hardly any difference between those responses. You can even say "и тебе тоже", no problem there

    Quote Originally Posted by xXHoax View Post

    Будь ты аккуратно!--
    -- Ты тоже (будь аккуратно)!
    What's this? You explained the concept very well there, but this one kind of stands out. No one would say it like that. I suppose you wanted to say: "be careful?". If so, then it should be "Береги себя!" or "Будь осторожен" depending on the context. The former is more suited for a very caring way of saying "goodbye", the latter is what you'd say to someone who's going to do something dangerous.

    Аккуратный took a stange turn in Russian, it's more about being neat (as in handwriting) or about someone who usually does things in a "neat, clean" way (like аккуратный хозяин), sometimes about a thing that's kept in such way. (аккуратная комната).

    But I can guess why аккуратный can be sometimes translated as careful. Example: someone just stepped on your toes, literally. A very possible response to that can be "аккуратнее!", like be more mindful of yourself or very well be careful! Also, remember that scene from "The Fifth Element" where Bruce Willis lights up his last match to bring fire to the last elemental stone? I suppose in English the people around him would yel something like "Easy! Easy!". In Russian that can be "Аккуратнее! Аккуратнее! or Аккуратно! Аккуратно!"
    I do not claim that my opinion is absolutely true.
    If you've spotted any mistake in my English, please, correct it. I want to be aware of any mistakes to efficiently eliminate them before they become a habit.

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    Почтенный гражданин xXHoax's Avatar
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    Oh yeah absolutely, sorry. I had to come up with a command and I couldn't think of anything. I had heard "Аккуратно!" on its own and I ran with it, but now that you point it out "Будь осторожен" sounds way better. Oops!
    "В тёмные времена хорошо видно светлых людей."
    - A quote, that only exists in Russian. Erich Maria Remarque

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    Властелин maxmixiv's Avatar
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    One could also be asked to be "внимательнее" (i.e. pay attention to traffic lights and other kinds of jeopardy)

    Back to the topic.
    There is the most popular phrase (recently performed by our prime minister):
    «Просто денег нет. Всего вам доброго, хорошего настроения и здоровья!»
    "Невозможно передать смысл иностранной фразы, не разрушив при этом её первоначальную структуру."

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    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxmixiv View Post
    ...
    Back to the topic.
    There is the most popular phrase (recently performed by our prime minister):
    «Просто денег нет. Всего вам доброго, хорошего настроения и здоровья!»

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