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Thread: E pluribus unum

  1. #1
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    E pluribus unum

    Two questions:
    1) Имя и название. I see "name" translated into both words. Имя for persons, Universities and other institutions; and название for streets, but I don't know if it is a mere coincidence. Are there any rules abt. use of these two words or it is only matter of tradition, etc.?

    2) Capitals and Вы. Which of these sentences are incorrect ?
    Я сдам Вам, Иван Иванович, книгу.
    Я сдам Вам книгу, Иван Иванович и Анна Николаевна.
    Я сдам вам книгу, Ваня и Аня .
    А, это Вы, Иван Иванович!
    А, это Вы, Иван Иванович и Анна Николаевна !
    А, это вы, Ваня и Аня !


    Thanks
    En febrero, siete capas y un sombrero.

  2. #2
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    Re: E pluribus unum

    Those are incorrect:
    Я сдам Вам книгу, Иван Иванович и Анна Николаевна.
    А, это Вы, Иван Иванович и Анна Николаевна !

    You should use "Вы" as a polite form of adress to a single person. Talking to two or more persons "вы" is used (just a plural).
    But you can say "А, это Вы, Иван Иванович, и Вы, Анна Николаевна!" to emphasize you respect them equaly or equally supriswd to see any of them. Though it's weird a bit.

  3. #3
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    gRomoZeka прав, но очень часто на эту разницу вообще не обращают внимания, и пишут "вы" во всех случаях с маленькой буквы.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    и пишут "вы" во всех случаях с маленькой буквы.
    ну это целиком на совести пишущего, в деловой переписке это как правило "Вы". (не зависимо от числа)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alware
    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    и пишут "вы" во всех случаях с маленькой буквы.
    ну это целиком на совести пишущего, в деловой переписке это как правило "Вы". (не зависимо от числа)
    I beg to differ: plural is always вы, but single can be both.
    Find your inner Bart!

  6. #6
    Старший оракул
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    Имя is used only for people (but sometimes it can mean "название предмета, явления"). Название is used for everything else including "Universities and other institutions".
    Please correct my mistakes if you can, especially article usage.
    My avatar shall be the author I'm currently reading.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vadim84
    Имя is used only for people (but sometimes it can mean "название предмета, явления").
    Not only for people but also for pets or any other living being who has it's own proper name. For example a lonely old lady names her cactus Bill. Thus "Bill" is "имя" of the plant, while "cactus" is it's "название".
    (I know it's crazy, just an example ).

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай chaika's Avatar
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    >"Bill" is "имя" of the plant
    it is not кличка?

  9. #9
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
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    кличка is more of a nickname I think. 'Bill' is definitely not a nickname (unless maybe the plant's real name was Mr. Twinklefanny)
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaika
    >"Bill" is "имя" of the plant
    it is not кличка?
    You are right in a manner. Кличка = имя talking about animals (especially dogs), but I think it isn't right for a plant. "Имя" is better here.

  11. #11
    Старший оракул
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    Not only for people but also for pets or any other living being who has it's own proper name. For example a lonely old lady names her cactus Bill. Thus "Bill" is "имя" of the plant, while "cactus" is it's "название".
    (I know it's crazy, just an example Smile ).
    You are right in theory, but in practice, имя is usually used for people and кличка for pets.
    I just wasn't considering those lonely old ladies and cactuses and such things 'cause they are not very relevant
    Please correct my mistakes if you can, especially article usage.
    My avatar shall be the author I'm currently reading.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vadim84
    You are right in theory, but in practice, имя is usually used for people and кличка for pets.
    I just wasn't considering those lonely old ladies and cactuses and such things 'cause they are not very relevant
    Обычно, но не всегда. В любом случае, мне хотелось показать разницу между словами "имя" и "название".
    These are shades of gray.
    Aniway, I tried to show difference between "имя" & "название". Bill IS NOT "название" of cactus, isn't it?

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