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Thread: "учиться" или "учить" - исправьте

  1. #1
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    "учиться" или "учить" - исправьте

    "учиться" или "учить"

    А. С. Пушкин учился в лицее 6 лет.
    Вова учит исторические даты.
    Таня учит песню, но так её и не выучила.
    Учить греческие слова очень трудно.
    (in EN it would be "learning words"..but in german it would be "Griechische Vokabeln lassen SICH SCHWER ERLERNEN"...)

    В каком классе ты учишься?

    Вика уже шестой год учится играть на пианино.
    Борис Петрович учится в институте 5 лет.
    Чайковский учился музыке в СПб.
    Нам надо учить уроки каждый день.
    no pain, no gain

  2. #2
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    I didn't find mistakes.
    My English isn't so good, зато с русским все в порядке ))
    I'll be very thankful, if you correct my mistakes.

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    спасибо огромное за быстрый ответ!

    just to make sure:

    учить = learn something new, like words etc. // teach + dative
    учиться = (self)study, especially at university, school etc.
    изучать = to study a subject at school, like Russian
    заниматься (чем) = to be concerned with, to study for an exam

    right?
    no pain, no gain

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    Re: "учиться" или "учить" - исправьте

    Quote Originally Posted by krobatshov
    Учить греческие слова очень трудно.
    (in EN it would be "learning words"..but in german it would be "Griechische Vokabeln lassen SICH SCHWER ERLERNEN"...)
    По-русски можно сказать так же, как и по-немецки:
    Греческие слова очень трудно учатся/выучиваются.
    Но это звучит несколько неуклюже.

  5. #5
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    All is correct.
    In addition:

    "заниматься чем-либо" is literally "to be occupied with"
    На досуге я занимаюсь изучением немецкого языка, рисованием и велотуризмом.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Indra
    "заниматься" is literally "to be occupied with"
    На досуге я занимаюсь изучением немецкого языка, рисованием и велотуризмом.
    so what is it like in everyday use? How do Russian pupils/students say that they have to learn for a test?

    At school we have to use this form when translating GER-RUS, but
    in my opinion it sounds too correctly to say "мне надо заниматся литературой"

    I think that they'll rather use another word
    no pain, no gain

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    so what is it like in everyday use? How do Russian pupils/students say that they have to learn for a test?
    krobatshov, will you translate this:

    - Привет! Чем занимаешься?
    - Не отвлекай меня, я занимаюсь!
    - Чем занимаешься?
    - Готовлюсь к контрольной по геометрии.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Indra
    so what is it like in everyday use? How do Russian pupils/students say that they have to learn for a test?
    krobatshov, will you translate this:

    - Привет! Чем занимаешься?
    - Не отвлекай меня, я занимаюсь!
    - Чем занимаешься?
    - Готовлюсь к контрольной по геометрии.

    GER:
    - Hallo! Womit besch
    no pain, no gain

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    Quote Originally Posted by krobatshov
    so what is it like in everyday use? How do Russian pupils/students say that they have to learn for a test?
    At school we have to use this form when translating GER-RUS, but
    in my opinion it sounds too correctly to say "мне надо заниматся литературой"
    I think that they'll rather use another word
    Я занят сегодня вечером, мне нужно готовиться к тесту.
    Я буду серьёзно готовиться к этому экзамену.
    Ты успел вчера подготовиться к тесту?
    Я уверен, что вы хорошо подготовились к этому важному экзамену.
    Я буду весь вечер заниматься, у меня экзамен завтра.
    "...Важно, чтобы форум оставался местом, объединяющим людей, для которых интересны русский язык и культура. ..." - MasterАdmin (из переписки)



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    ok, I think I've already found out the fine differences!

    just wanted to make sure..
    no pain, no gain

  11. #11
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    - Не отвлекай меня, я занимаюсь!

    - Lenk mich nicht ab, ich bin besch

  12. #12
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    [quote=Indra]- Не отвлекай меня, я занимаюсь!

    - Lenk mich nicht ab, ich bin besch
    no pain, no gain

  13. #13
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    Just don't mix up
    "я занят" (I'm busy) and "я занимаюсь" (I'm concerned with smth)

    You are very good in Russian, you know this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Indra
    Just don't mix up
    "я занят" (I'm busy) and "я занимаюсь" (I'm concerned with smth)

    You are very good in Russian, you know this?
    are you joking or what? :P
    no pain, no gain

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by krobatshov
    are you joking or what? :P
    Я серьёзна, как стадо слонов.

    I'm so bored trying to find a German pal on various penpal sites. It's always, hello, I started learning alphabet this Monday. I know a proverb, I was said, it is Chinese, "Начинающих - что шерстинок у коровы, достигших - что рогов у единорога" - they all throw it in the towel after a couple of months.

    BTW, I've come across an interesting observation recently. It was in an article about American-Russian cultural differences, the link posted by Lampada. It was said there that the antonym to "smile" is "being serious" in Russia and "being angry" in America. What's there in Germany about this?

    Sorry for offtopic

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indra
    Quote Originally Posted by krobatshov
    are you joking or what? :P
    Я серьёзна, как стадо слонов.

    I'm so bored trying to find a German pal on various penpal sites. It's always, hello, I started learning alphabet this Monday. I know a proverb, I was said, it is Chinese, "Начинающих - что шерстинок у коровы, достигших - что рогов у единорога" - they all throw it in the towel after a couple of months.

    BTW, I've come across an interesting observation recently. It was in an article about American-Russian cultural differences, the link posted by Lampada. It was said there that the antonym to "smile" is "being serious" in Russia and "being angry" in America. What's there in Germany about this?

    Sorry for offtopic
    Learning the russian alphabet was not a problem at all for me. I tought it myself, using the internet within a short time...just before school began. Can definitely write more than proverbs in Russian

    My Russian teacher says that Russians actually love people who know proverbs - as long as they also know when to use them

    To get back to your question what the opposite/antonym of SMILE was:
    it is CRYING

    In some cases it might also be "being angry" - comparable to Russian
    no pain, no gain

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