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  1. #1
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    С... ДО...

    I knew that the prepositions c (from, since) and до (until) take genitive.

    However, I found that these periods are correct, and I don’t understand.

    С одиннадцати (часов) до часа.
    С часу до пяти (часов).

    Thanks for the help.
    Quant'

  2. #2
    Властелин
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    С часу до пяти (часов).
    Isn't it colloquial?
    "С часа до пяти часов" would be correct. ?
    -- Да? Коту Ваське, бл##?
    -- Нет, Я кот Васька :-/

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vincent Tailors
    "С часа до пяти часов" would be correct. ?
    ...no Vincent, I don't think so.
    My girl too said that С часу до пяти is the correct form, but she doesn't know explain me why...
    Quant'

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vincent Tailors
    С часу до пяти (часов).
    Isn't it colloquial?
    "С часа до пяти часов" would be correct. ?
    "С часу" говорят очень часто. "С часа" тоже в принципе правильно, но о времени так говорят намного реже.
    In Russian, all nationalities and their corresponding languages start with a lower-case letter.

  5. #5
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    One of "hidden cases" of the Russain grammar

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Оля
    "С часу" говорят очень часто. "С часа" тоже в принципе правильно, но о времени так говорят намного реже.
    Mmmh, it is now more...unclear to me. You are saying that, in this case, it's not correct to use a gramatically correct form?

    Quote Originally Posted by Indra
    "hidden cases" of the Russain grammar
    What's the meaning of "Hidden cases"?
    Quant'

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by samurai
    What's the meaning of "Hidden cases"?
    Echo of ancient language

  8. #8
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Russian_grammar
    Missing cases for the nouns in Russian Language
    The table with six cases is oversimplified, although it is exactly what is used in beginner level Russian text books. Different academic sources list between 9 and 15 cases for Russian language, although the actual count is debatable.

    Here are all the missing cases I could find:

    1. Locative (в лесу, в снегу, в кровИ, в слезАх) this case is strictly different from Prepositional (о лесе, о снеге, о крОви, о слЁзах) for some 200-300 words, most of these words are very common monosyllabic nouns.

    2. Partitive aka Genitive II (сахару, чаю, воды) This is called "количественно-отделительный" in ref. 2. Used to denote an amount which isn't a number (a spoon of sugar, a bucket of water, some tea)

    3. Counting I (шагА, рядА, часА, шарА) - used for amounts two, three, four, twenty-two, twenty-three, etc. Similar to Genitive Singular (шАга, рЯда, чАса, шАра) except for the accented syllable in several common words.

    4. Counting II (чулков, сапогов, человек, вольт, грамм, гусаров, байт) - This case is called "счётный" in ref 1 and 2. This is NOT identical to Genitive Plural which it is often confused with (чулок, сапог, человеков, вольтов, граммов, гусар, байтов)

    5. Illative (в солдаты, в люди, в зятья) - This case is called "включительный" in ref 1 and 2

    6. Awaiting case: (жду мать, жду письма, жду результата) - This debatable case is called "ждательный") in ref 1 and 2, it appears after the verb "wait for" and is usually simular to Genitive and Accusative.

    7. Abessive (не читал газеты) this debatable case is called "лишительный" in ref 2.

    8. Vocative Church Slavonic (боже, господи, владыко, отче) This is the only nontrivial case mentioned in the article.

    9. Vocative Old (деда, доча, сынка) (archaic, but still in use in the country)

    10. Vocative New (дядь, мам, Лен, тёть, солнц, ребят, девчат, батянь) (recent development in colloquial Russian. This case applies to all personified nouns ending with -a or -ya) ref 3

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indra
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Russian_grammar
    Missing cases for the nouns... ...all personified nouns ending with -a or -ya) ref 3
    Очень-очень интересно! Большое спасибо!
    Quant'

  10. #10
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    So the bottom line is that in the original asker's example, both the words after "c" are in the genitive. одиннадцати and часу.

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