Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Необычные глаголы

  1. #1
    Почтенный гражданин Misha Tal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Tehran, Iran
    Posts
    154
    Rep Power
    7

    Необычные глаголы

    Watching a Russian film, a strange verb caught my attention: пойдемте!
    And immediately after that, yet another, equally strange one: ждемте!
    What's going on here?! My grammar book says nothing about this phenomenon. Dictionaries won't help either. I even doubt if I've heard it correctly.
    So please give a few examples, and the grammatical subtleties, if there are any.
    Thanks.
    "If in the end, Misha, you are destined to lose this game, there is no need for the reason to be cowardice!"

  2. #2
    Завсегдатай it-ogo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    3,049
    Rep Power
    26

    Re: Необычные глаголы

    Quote Originally Posted by Misha Tal
    Watching a Russian film, a strange verb caught my attention: пойдемте!
    And immediately after that, yet another, equally strange one: ждемте!
    What's going on here?! My grammar book says nothing about this phenomenon. Dictionaries won't help either. I even doubt if I've heard it correctly.
    So please give a few examples, and the grammatical subtleties, if there are any.
    Thanks.
    пойдемте This is a kind of imperative form of the verb "пойти" in plural, first person. It means "let us go". I don't know if it is literal or colloquial form.

    The regular imperative is second-person, so it is: пойди (single) / пойдите (plural/polite), which means "Go" or "Let you go." Now the verbs in future first person plural can be used as a first person imperative: "пойдем" can mean "Let us go"

    Then to be polite (or to emphasize the imperativeness) one can add "-те" as if it was a regular second-person imperative.

    Ждемте is the same for the verb ждать. Second person imperative is жди/ждите.

    One more example.
    WAys to say "Let us sit down":

    - Присядем?
    This is a question "Will us sit down?"

    Давай(те) приcядем.
    "Let us sit down."

    - Присядем.
    - Присядемте.
    "Let us sit down."

    Again this is not quite literal so it is better to avoid this form and use "давай(те)".
    "Россия для русских" - это неправильно. Остальные-то чем лучше?

  3. #3
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    South of Russia
    Posts
    178
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Необычные глаголы

    пойдёмте, ждёмте, присядемте - gramatically incorrect forms, even for colloquial speach. Movie director used them to show a character as an uneducated person or to create comic effect.

  4. #4
    Увлечённый спикер
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    60
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Необычные глаголы

    Quote Originally Posted by Misha Tal
    Watching a Russian film, a strange verb caught my attention: пойдемте!
    So please give a few examples, and the grammatical subtleties, if there are any.
    Thanks.
    You can also use Идёмте!
    Helping foreign learners with Russian via Skype.

  5. #5
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Russia
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Необычные глаголы

    Quote Originally Posted by LuxDefensor
    пойдёмте, ждёмте, присядемте - gramatically incorrect forms, even for colloquial speach. Movie director used them to show a character as an uneducated person or to create comic effect.
    That's wrong (except "ждёмте" is in fact incorrect, I think). See for example http://www.gramota.ru/spravka/buro/s...E4%E5%EC%F2%E5 (in Russian). It says they're completely correct except trey're gradually becoming obsolete being pushed by the forms like "давай пойдём", "давай присядем". I think: 1. they can be used without "давай" as well, and 2. "Xте" is a complete equivalent to "давайте X' ", not "давай X' " (where X' is the perfective form of X), however the latter is also possible sometimes.

    I thought before I've seen this question and the answer by gramora.ru that -те forms are used when you appeal to someone grammatically plural like someone you are "на вы" or a group of people. And the forms without -те to those who're grammatically singular.

    And it seems there's some thuth in that view. For example, it's impolite to say "Давай сядем" to a person you're "на вы", it's only for "на ты" (at least I feel it that way). But it's ok to say "присядем", while "присядемте" sounds a bit old-fashioned. "Пойдёмте" doesn't sound old-fashioned to me, the rule from the last paragraph seems to aplly to it.

    Out of the words mentioned in the gramota.ru's answer
    normal to slightly unusual: давайте, пойдёмте, идёмте, поедемте, плывёмте
    old-fashioned to slightly unusual: споёмте, умрёмте, станемте, летимте

    (Corrections are appreciated.)

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай it-ogo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    3,049
    Rep Power
    26

    Re: Необычные глаголы

    Quote Originally Posted by AKAK


    Here is the name of this form: "форма повелительного наклонения совместного действия." In English it should be "Imperative cooperative".
    "Россия для русских" - это неправильно. Остальные-то чем лучше?

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: May 24th, 2015, 06:23 PM
  2. Глаголы типа сходить
    By Zubr in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: July 8th, 2010, 09:08 AM
  3. Глаголы с частицей -ся
    By radomir in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: October 11th, 2008, 06:09 PM
  4. Глаголы движения
    By radomir in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 18th, 2008, 02:47 PM
  5. как спрягать глаголы движения????
    By basurero in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: June 26th, 2006, 02:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary