Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Phrase from Agata Kristi - "Nezhivaya Voda"

  1. #1
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Phrase from Agata Kristi - "Nezhivaya Voda"

    I'm struggling with the meaning of this phrase. I think it is the double negatives that are throwing me off:

    "Я все равно ничего не теряю"

  2. #2
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Moscow,50 feet above the ground
    Posts
    4,106
    Rep Power
    13
    Anyway I lose nothing
    - something like this
    Я так думаю.

  3. #3
    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    СССР -> США
    Posts
    17,627
    Rep Power
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Leof
    Anyway I lose nothing
    - something like this
    Or In any case, I am not losing anything here.
    "...Важно, чтобы форум оставался местом, объединяющим людей, для которых интересны русский язык и культура. ..." - MasterАdmin (из переписки)



  4. #4
    Новичок
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0
    Thanks. Just for clarification, what is the meaning of "все" in this sentence? To my knowledge, it usually means "all".

  5. #5
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    10
    It means 'all' as in 'all the same'... 'anyway'.
    Language Global Link - forums for language enthusiasts.

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sunnyvale, Cali
    Posts
    5,771
    Rep Power
    15
    Another variation:

    Anyway, I've got nothing to lose.

    That would be the more common version, IMHO
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    в небе
    Posts
    2,223
    Rep Power
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    Another variation:

    Anyway, I've got nothing to lose.

    That would be the more common version, IMHO :)
    I think there's a difference in Russian.
    я ничего не теряю - I maybe have something to lose but I'm not going to lose it in any case
    мне нечего терять - I don't have anything so I can't lose anything

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sunnyvale, Cali
    Posts
    5,771
    Rep Power
    15
    [quote=net surfer]
    Quote Originally Posted by "kalinka_vinnie":s0depzhy
    Another variation:

    Anyway, I've got nothing to lose.

    That would be the more common version, IMHO
    I think there's a difference in Russian.
    я ничего не теряю - I maybe have something to lose but I'm not going to lose it in any case
    мне нечего терять - I don't have anything so I can't lose anything[/quote:s0depzhy]

    There might be a difference in Russian, but you would translate the same way in Englisj

    I've got nothing to lose - could mean: I have no valuables to lose, I am poor,; or, whatever happens I will not lose what I have.
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

  9. #9
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    458
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Vostfeltion
    Thanks. Just for clarification, what is the meaning of "все" in this sentence? To my knowledge, it usually means "all".
    "Все равно" is a steady phrase which means "anyway". "Все" separately means nothing here.
    My English isn't so good, зато с русским все в порядке ))
    I'll be very thankful, if you correct my mistakes.

  10. #10
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Serving Polonium-flavoured Sake at a London Japanese Restaurant
    Posts
    2,662
    Rep Power
    12
    To expand on this question, if I'm asked what I would rather eat for dinner, chicken or beef, I think could answer "все равно" with the meaning of "it's all the same to me"/"I don't care." In what sense is this interpreted:
    a) positively: I like both chicken and beef equally
    b) negatively: I don't care -- you'/your food offends me for some reason
    c) either -- it just depends on tone?
    Заранее благодарю всех за исправление ошибок в моём русском.

  11. #11
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    My Time & Space
    Posts
    6,559
    Rep Power
    16
    In most cases you'll be understood positiveley, i.e. you don't care what to have right now, anything will go.
    «И всё, что сейчас происходит внутре — тоже является частью вселенной».

  12. #12
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,348
    Rep Power
    11
    [quote=kalinka_vinnie][quote="net surfer":lnlhz7be]
    Quote Originally Posted by "kalinka_vinnie":lnlhz7be
    Another variation:

    Anyway, I've got nothing to lose.

    That would be the more common version, IMHO
    I think there's a difference in Russian.
    я ничего не теряю - I maybe have something to lose but I'm not going to lose it in any case
    мне нечего терять - I don't have anything so I can't lose anything[/quote:lnlhz7be]

    There might be a difference in Russian, but you would translate the same way in Englisj

    I've got nothing to lose - could mean: I have no valuables to lose, I am poor,; or, whatever happens I will not lose what I have.[/quote:lnlhz7be]

    Hmm... Is it so? For me that English phrase also sounds as in part (2) only, I would definitely not interpret it as "we are safe nothing can happen". If anything it sounds like a warning about something bad that is likely to happen, but that won't hurt our situation much since it's bad already, something like that.

  13. #13
    Завсегдатай kalinka_vinnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sunnyvale, Cali
    Posts
    5,771
    Rep Power
    15
    [quote=laxxy][quote=kalinka_vinnie]
    Quote Originally Posted by "net surfer":ihnos1f6
    Quote Originally Posted by "kalinka_vinnie":ihnos1f6
    Another variation:

    Anyway, I've got nothing to lose.

    That would be the more common version, IMHO
    I think there's a difference in Russian.
    я ничего не теряю - I maybe have something to lose but I'm not going to lose it in any case
    мне нечего терять - I don't have anything so I can't lose anything
    There might be a difference in Russian, but you would translate the same way in Englisj

    I've got nothing to lose - could mean: I have no valuables to lose, I am poor,; or, whatever happens I will not lose what I have.[/quote:ihnos1f6]

    Hmm... Is it so? For me that English phrase also sounds as in part (2) only, I would definitely not interpret it as "we are safe nothing can happen". If anything it sounds like a warning about something bad that is likely to happen, but that won't hurt our situation much since it's bad already, something like that.[/quote:ihnos1f6]

    Let me explain it like this:

    -You will lose your house, your family, everything!
    - (ironic) I have nothing to lose (Мне нечего терять)

    - This new project is a win-win situation!
    - Yeah, we've got nothing to lose (мы ничего не теряем)
    Hei, rett norsken min og du er død.
    I am a notourriouse misspeller. Be easy on me.
    Пожалуйста! Исправляйте мои глупые ошибки (но оставьте умные)!
    Yo hablo español mejor que tú.
    Trusnse kal'rt eturule sikay!!! ))

  14. #14
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,348
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    - This new project is a win-win situation!
    - Yeah, we've got nothing to lose (мы ничего не теряем)
    OK, thanks. Now I've learned something new.

  15. #15
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    в небе
    Posts
    2,223
    Rep Power
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by kalinka_vinnie
    There might be a difference in Russian, but you would translate the same way in Englisj

    I've got nothing to lose - could mean: I have no valuables to lose, I am poor,; or, whatever happens I will not lose what I have.
    Oh, ok.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: March 24th, 2010, 04:03 PM
  2. "Competition-worthy economy" - does the phrase make sense?
    By translationsnmru in forum Learn English - Грамматика, переводы, словарный запас
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: November 5th, 2009, 05:38 AM
  3. How to translate phrase "How can I say"?
    By STRELOK in forum Translate This!
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: April 5th, 2008, 08:36 PM
  4. The phrase " Excuse Me" in Russian.
    By scott in forum Getting Started with Russian
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: June 10th, 2005, 04:44 AM
  5. old" help" me phrase
    By johnnydrum in forum Pronunciation, Speech & Accent
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: February 13th, 2005, 08:08 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary