Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Куприн, я еще не умер

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14

    Куприн, я еще не умер

    Я сказал же, что буду закончить "Гранатовый Браслет", "даже если умру от скуки, читая его!!"

    Я наконец добрался до интересного пункта - Вера получила письмо с браслетом от тайнственного "Г.С.Ж."

    By the way, what time-period does this take place? It's about aristocracy, so it has to be before 1917, but they do mention having cars, and there is a reference to the Russo-Japanese war.

    Но мне было трудно понимать немного:

    Gen. Anosov is a deaf guy so he was in the opera and thought he was whispering something to his friend:
    "А ведь это чисто взял до, черт возьми! Точно орех разгрыз"
    I'm not sure what he's saying though.

    По обязанности коменданта он довольно часто, вместе со своими хрипящищи мопсами, посещал главную гауптвахту, где весьма уютно "а винтом, чаем и анекдотами отдыхали от тягот военной службы арестованные офицеры."
    In the habit of the commander, he quite often together with his "mops"(wtf is a mops?) visited the main "Hauptwacht", where very cozily "with 'screws', tea, and jokes arrested officers rested from the burden of military service."
    But later on, it says Anosov asked:
    "откуда офицеру носят обед и сколько он за него платит."
    from where he should have dinner brought to the officer and how much he'd pay for it.

    I'm confused. If the officers are arrested and in some kind of jail, how come they can have fun and drink tea and have outside food brought in? Don't they get food if they're in a jail?

    Случалось, что какой-нибудь заблудший подпоручик, присланный для долговременной отсидки из такого захолустья, где даже не имелось собственной гауптвахты, признавался, что он, по безденежью, довольствуется из солдатского хотла. Аносов немедленно распоряжался, чтобы бедняге носили обед из комендантского дома, от которого до гауптвахты было не более двухсот шагов.
    It came to pass, that some kind of lower officer, sent for a long confinement from some back-woods station that didn't even have it's own Hauptwacht, admitted, that because he didn't have money he pleased himself from soldier's "khotol." Anosov quickly ordered for dinner to be brought to the poor chap from the Commander's home, from which to the Hauptwacht was not more than 200 steps.

    I'm confused that they would send the officer by himself just to go to jail. If I were him I would just go have fun for a while then come back.

    This next story I didn't really understand at all. Vasily Lvovich is telling sioem stroy about Nikolai Nikolajevich.
    Сегодня он рассказывал о неудавшейся женитьбе Николая Николаевича на одной богатой красивой даме. В основе было только то, что муж дамы не хотел давать ей развода. Но несколько чопорного Николая он заставил ночью бежать по улице в одних шупках, с башмаками под мышкой. Где-то на углу молодого человека задержал городовой, и только после длинного и бурного объяснения Николаю удалось доказать, что он товарищ прокурора, а не ночной грабитель. Свадьба, по словам рассказчика, чуть-чуть было не состоялась, но в самую критическую минуту отчаянная банда лжесвидетелей, участвовавщих в деле, вдруг забастовала, требуя прибавки к заработной плате. Николай из скупости (он и в самом деле был скуповат) а таже будучи принципиальным противником стачек и забастовок, наотрез отказался платить лишнее, ссылаясь на определенную статью закона, подтвержденную мнением кассиационного департмента. Тогда рассерженные лжесвидетели на известный вопрос "Не знает ли кто-нибудь из присуствующих поводов, препятствующих совершению брака?" - хором ответили: "Да, знаем. Все показанное нами на суде под присягой - сплошная ложь, к которой нас принудил угрозами и насилием господин прокурор. А про мужа этой дамы мы, как осведомленные лица, можем сказать только, что это самы почтенный человек на свете, целомудренный, как Иосиф, и ангельской добротой" AHHH finally thats done

    I could understand the words, but not how the story is supposed to work:
    Today he told about the failed wedding of Nikolai Nikolajevich to a certain rich and beautiful lady. The main thing was only that the husband of the wife didn't want to give her a divorce. But he sent(who's he?) Nikolai to go run around on the streets at night in only one stocking(gasp!) with shoes below his "Myshka(whats that?)" Somewhere on the corner a policeman stopped the young fellow, and only after a long and vehement explanation did Nikolai prove that he was a friend of the Procuror, and not a night thief. The wedding, in the words of the storyteller, almost went through, but in the critical minute a band of false witnesses, participating in the matter, suddenly went on strike, demanding an increase in wages(i didn't know that "False Witness" could be a job with regular pay in pre-revolution Russia?) Nikolai, from stinginess(actually he was quite a stingy person), and also as he was the main opposer of demonstrators and strikers, refused to pay more, bla bla bla bla bla(citing some big law thing boring). Then the angered false witnesses, upon the well-known question "Is there anyone present today who knows why this wedding should not take place?" answered together "Yes, we know! Everything we said under oath in court was a lie, which the procuror made us say under threats! However the husband of this lady is the most honorable man on earth, bla bla, like Joseph, with angels goodness!"

    I'm confused. How could the wedding have taken place if the lady was still married to the man, who never gave her a divorce? What did the scandalous running around at night with only one stocking on have to do with ANYTHING?!?!? Is "False witness" actually a job, apparently you get paid to lie under oath? ??!??! AHHH!!

    There was more I didn't understand, but that's enough for now. Post is already long enough.

  2. #2
    Administrator MasterAdmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    MasterRussian.com
    Posts
    1,731
    Rep Power
    13
    Судя по другому сообщению, этот топик надо переименовать
    ~ Мастерадминов Мастерадмин Мастерадминович ~

  3. #3
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    By the way, what time-period does this take place? It's about aristocracy, so it has to be before 1917, but they do mention having cars, and there is a reference to the Russo-Japanese war.
    1904-1905 - Русско-японская война.


    Gen. Anosov is a deaf guy so he was in the opera and thought he was whispering something to his friend:
    "А ведь это чисто взял до, черт возьми! Точно орех разгрыз"
    I'm not sure what he's saying though.
    "But he clearly sang "do" [C-note], damn him! Like cracked a nut."
    По обязанности коменданта он довольно часто, вместе со своими хрипящищи мопсами, посещал главную гауптвахту, где весьма уютно "а винтом, чаем и анекдотами отдыхали от тягот военной службы арестованные офицеры."
    In the habit of the commander, he quite often together with his "mops"(wtf is a mops?) visited the main "Hauptwacht", where very cozily "with 'screws', tea, and jokes arrested officers rested from the burden of military service."
    But later on, it says Anosov asked:
    "откуда офицеру носят обед и сколько он за него платит."
    from where he should have dinner brought to the officer and how much he'd pay for it.

    I'm confused. If the officers are arrested and in some kind of jail, how come they can have fun and drink tea and have outside food brought in? Don't they get food if they're in a jail?
    "Мопс" is a "pug-dog".
    "Гауптвахта" = guardhouse for soldiers and officers.
    "Винт" = a bridge-like card game.
    The officers of course were in preferable position comparing with soldiers, because they were alowed to sent for food and tea from loсal restaurants.

    Случалось, что какой-нибудь заблудший подпоручик, присланный для долговременной отсидки из такого захолустья, где даже не имелось собственной гауптвахты, признавался, что он, по безденежью, довольствуется из солдатского хотла. Аносов немедленно распоряжался, чтобы бедняге носили обед из комендантского дома, от которого до гауптвахты было не более двухсот шагов.
    It came to pass, that some kind of lower officer, sent for a long confinement from some back-woods station that didn't even have it's own Hauptwacht, admitted, that because he didn't have money he pleased himself from soldier's "khotol." Anosov quickly ordered for dinner to be brought to the poor chap from the Commander's home, from which to the Hauptwacht was not more than 200 steps.

    I'm confused that they would send the officer by himself just to go to jail. If I were him I would just go have fun for a while then come back.
    "Котёл" = cauldron
    "есть, питаться etc. из общего котла" means "to eat the usual stuff that everybody eats".

    "Бедняге носили обед" - it means that somebody delivered him a dinner, it was not him who went to Commander's home. It is so called impersonal construction with 3rd plural and very often it is translated with passive voice "the dinner was delivered to him".

    The same about "откуда офицеру(dative) носят (3rd plural) обед и сколько он(nominative) за него платит(3rd singular".
    This next story I didn't really understand at all. Vasily Lvovich is telling sioem stroy about Nikolai Nikolajevich.
    Сегодня он рассказывал о неудавшейся женитьбе Николая Николаевича на одной богатой красивой даме. В основе было только то, что муж дамы не хотел давать ей развода. Но несколько чопорного Николая он заставил ночью бежать по улице в одних шупках, с башмаками под мышкой. Где-то на углу молодого человека задержал городовой, и только после длинного и бурного объяснения Николаю удалось доказать, что он товарищ прокурора, а не ночной грабитель. Свадьба, по словам рассказчика, чуть-чуть было не состоялась, но в самую критическую минуту отчаянная банда лжесвидетелей, участвовавщих в деле, вдруг забастовала, требуя прибавки к заработной плате. Николай из скупости (он и в самом деле был скуповат) а таже будучи принципиальным противником стачек и забастовок, наотрез отказался платить лишнее, ссылаясь на определенную статью закона, подтвержденную мнением кассиационного департмента. Тогда рассерженные лжесвидетели на известный вопрос "Не знает ли кто-нибудь из присуствующих поводов, препятствующих совершению брака?" - хором ответили: "Да, знаем. Все показанное нами на суде под присягой - сплошная ложь, к которой нас принудил угрозами и насилием господин прокурор. А про мужа этой дамы мы, как осведомленные лица, можем сказать только, что это самы почтенный человек на свете, целомудренный, как Иосиф, и ангельской добротой" AHHH finally thats done

    I could understand the words, but not how the story is supposed to work:
    Today he told about the failed wedding of Nikolai Nikolajevich to a certain rich and beautiful lady. The main thing was only that the husband of the wife didn't want to give her a divorce. But he sent(who's he?) Nikolai to go run around on the streets at night in only one stocking(gasp!) with shoes below his "Myshka(whats that?)" Somewhere on the corner a policeman stopped the young fellow, and only after a long and vehement explanation did Nikolai prove that he was a friend of the Procuror, and not a night thief. The wedding, in the words of the storyteller, almost went through, but in the critical minute a band of false witnesses, participating in the matter, suddenly went on strike, demanding an increase in wages(i didn't know that "False Witness" could be a job with regular pay in pre-revolution Russia?) Nikolai, from stinginess(actually he was quite a stingy person), and also as he was the main opposer of demonstrators and strikers, refused to pay more, bla bla bla bla bla(citing some big law thing boring). Then the angered false witnesses, upon the well-known question "Is there anyone present today who knows why this wedding should not take place?" answered together "Yes, we know! Everything we said under oath in court was a lie, which the procuror made us say under threats! However the husband of this lady is the most honorable man on earth, bla bla, like Joseph, with angels goodness!"
    "Под мышкой" = under/in one's armpit (very common expression).
    "Прокурор" = prosecutor in a court.
    (i didn't know that "False Witness" could be a job with regular pay in pre-revolution Russia?) = hahahaha, of course not, it is an irony. For example there's no official market of narcotic drugs neither in USA nor in Russia, but there are some fixed prices.

    I'm confused. How could the wedding have taken place if the lady was still married to the man, who never gave her a divorce? What did the scandalous running around at night with only one stocking on have to do with ANYTHING?!?!? Is "False witness" actually a job, apparently you get paid to lie under oath? ??!??! AHHH!!
    They (a man and a woman) might go away to another town and visit another church or whatever. It was a very usual practice in many countries. That is why there were and still are some laws against "polygamists" in many societies where one man is alowed to have only one wife. But it sometimes happens that a man registers marriage without having divorced with the previous wife and vice versa.

  4. #4
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    hey, Propp, thanks for the help! But I still have questions:

    Although the story is pointless to the plot, I still want to understand:
    What did he have to run around on the street in one stocking for, and who sent him to do it?

    I don't know if you've ever actually read it, but maybe you can explain to me: How is it General Anosov is supposed to be Vera and Anna's grandfather if he never had children? Or is he a just an old man that they really like and call "grandpa"?

    Why is it they adress General Anosov as Вы even though they also call him Дедушка, and he has known them very intimately since childhood? I read in a different post you would certainly not call your бабушка as Вы, so why grandpa?

    When Anosov comes in, they run up to him all happy like, and then he says this:
    "Точно....архиерея!"
    I have no idea what he intends to say to the girls by mentioning "Bishop."
    He also asks Vera: "Когда крестить позовёшь?"
    If I'm not wrong is he asking Vera when is she going to be baptized? I thought in Russian Orthodoxy they get baptized as babies. She answers: "О, боюсь, что никогда..." Isn't this kind of weird? I thought it was the fashion for most aristocracy to be some kind of Christian...

    Anosov is talking about heroism and being afraid in battle, then he says this:
    Только один весь от страха раскисает, а другой себя держит в руках. И видишь: Страх-то остается всегда один и тот же, а уменье держать себя от практики все возрастает; отсюда и герои и храбрецы.
    Anosov has this way of talking that really confuses me

    Afterwards, Anosov drags on into another unrelated war-story. But for the sake of completeness, I wanted to understand what he's talking about. He is talking about going into Bucharest, then he says "жители встретили нас на городской площади с пушечную пальбою, от чего пострадало много окошек: но те, на которых поставлена была в стаканах вода, остались невредимы. А почему я это узнал? А вот почему. Пришедши на отведенную мне квартиру, я увидел на окошке стоящую низенькую клеточку, на клеточке была большого размера хрустальная бутылка с прозрачной водой, в ней плавали золотые рыбки, и между ними сидела на примосточке канарейка. Канарейка в воде! - это мне удивило, но, осмотрев, увидел, что в бутылке дно широко и вдавлено глубоко в середину, так что канарейка свободна могла влетать туда и сидеть. После сего сознался сам себе, что я очень недогадлив.
    The inhabitatnts met us in the town square with cannon-fire, from which many windows were shattetered: but those, that had glasses of water on them, remained unharmed. But how did I figure this out? Here's how. Coming to my appointed apartment, I saw on the windowsill a low "kletochka", on which there was a large cyrstal bottle with clear water, where goldfish swam, and between them on a little bridge sat a canary. A canary in the water! This amazed me, but looking close, I saw that in the bottle the bottom was wide and it pinched off deeply in the middle, so that the canary could freely fly there and sit. After this, I admitted to myself I wasn't very perceptive.

    Afterwards, he goes into the apartment and there is a lady there. He asks her "почему у них целы стекла после канонады, и она мне объяснила, что это от воды. А также объяснила и про канарейку: до чего я был несообразителен! " I don't understand how this explains anything.

    ?!?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!??!???? From what I understood, this is order of events:
    1. Russians come to Bucharest
    2. Inhabitants shoot at them with cannons, breaking a lot of windows(accidentally)
    3. Magically because of glasses of water, windows are unharmed from random cannon-fire
    4. The reason being that Anosov saw a canary in a bottle of water.
    5. Lady tells Anosov that the windows didn't get broken because of the water. Also explains something about canary.
    ?!?!?!?!? This doesn't make ANY SENSE!!! If the people are shooting cannon all over the place, and accidentally breaking some windows, I don't understand how glasses of water protected them. And what did a canary in a bottle have to do with anything?


    I think that's enough for now...

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    Кстати, только что создал сайт для моего перевода "Гранатового Браслета", вы можете его найти здесь:
    http://www.freewebs.com/pravit/translation.htm
    пока он не очень красив, но я буду его улучшить

    я решил пытаться переводить это на английском, как упражнение для себя, и тоже потому что нет такого перевода на интернете. я бы очень хотел ваш совет, исправления!

  6. #6
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    Don't be upset, Pravit, I'm making an answer to your long post. It is not quick thing...
    BTW, I've read Гранатовый браслет, thank you for this. Without you encouragement I would never think of doing it by myself.

  7. #7
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    what made you think I'm upset?
    ah, so you hadn't read it until now? i have my ukrainian friend Катя helping me as well, so I have to finish it now!
    thanks for your help!!!
    BTW, if you are interested, you can also take a look at my (attempted) english translation

  8. #8
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    ================================================== ===================================
    OKey (as Brits write), I've read Гранатовый браслет and ready to make answers.

    First of all I should warn you that there are some misprints in the electornic text from www.lib.ru (I suspect we were reading the same text). For example, детух instead of петух the first tim this fish is mentioned, "а винтом, чаем и анекдотами отдыхали от тягот военной службы арестованные офицеры" instead of за винтом..." etc.

    What did he have to run around on the street in one stocking for, and who sent him to do it?
    As you may be know from previous extract:
    ......
    У него была необыкновенная и очень своеобразная способность
    рассказывать. Он брал в основу рассказа истинный эпизод, где главным
    действующим лицом являлся кто-нибудь из присутствующих или общих знакомых,
    но так сгущал краски и при этом говорил с таким серьезным лицом и таким
    деловым тоном, что слушатели надрывались от смеха.
    ......

    It means that Vasily Lvovich liked to tell funny stories based on real facts but exaggerated a lot, so to entertain listeners. The story about Nickolay and another man's wife was also this kind of exaggeration.In his story he made Nickolay to run in the socks with boots under his armpits, but it doesn't mean that this was the truth.
    BTW "в одних носках" = "in only socks [without boots]"
    I don't know what were the details of this story, may be the wrathful husband chased him along the streets or whatever.

    I don't know if you've ever actually read it, but maybe you can explain to me: How is it General Anosov is supposed to be Vera and Anna's grandfather if he never had children? Or is he a just an old man that they really like and call "grandpa"?
    Yes, he is really just an old man and they call him "дедушка" to show they really like him. It is usual fact when you call an old man "дед", especially when he is not from "aristocratic" sphere, or hase quite an ordinary background. You know that Amosov, in spite of being general was quite unaffected and pleasant to have a talk with.

    You may also call an old woman "бабка" but it sounds rather vulgar. "Бабушка" is used quite rarely in this sence.
    "Дядя" and "тётя" on the other hand are used very often to describe middle-aged persons, especially in children's speech. Some parents encourage their children to adress adult persons like this: "Дядя Петя, тётя Наташа" etc. It's like "Ucle Tom", you know.
    You may call unpolitely any woman "тётка".

    Why is it they adress General Anosov as Вы even though they also call him Дедушка, and he has known them very intimately since childhood? I read in a different post you would certainly not call your бабушка as Вы, so why grandpa?
    Well, to show their respect to him. After all he was not their real grandfather. And they are from aristocratic origin and used to politely adressing people with "Вы".

    When Anosov comes in, they run up to him all happy like, and then he says this:
    "Точно....архиерея!"
    I have no idea what he intends to say to the girls by mentioning "Bishop."
    They were leading hims under his arms like servant are leading an archbishop.

    He also asks Vera: "Когда крестить позовёшь?"
    If I'm not wrong is he asking Vera when is she going to be baptized? I thought in Russian Orthodoxy they get baptized as babies. She answers: "О, боюсь, что никогда..." Isn't this kind of weird? I thought it was the fashion for most aristocracy to be some kind of Christian...
    He asked her when she would call him to baptize her baby.

    Anosov is talking about heroism and being afraid in battle, then he says this:
    Только один весь от страха раскисает, а другой себя держит в руках. И видишь: Страх-то остается всегда один и тот же, а уменье держать себя от практики все возрастает; отсюда и герои и храбрецы.
    Anosov has this way of talking that really confuses me
    Only one person is becoming limp with fright, but another restrains himself [держит себя в руках]. And you see: the fright is always the same, but the skill to restrain yourself is growing from practice; hence are heroes and braves.


    Afterwards, Anosov drags on into another unrelated war-story. But for the sake of completeness, I wanted to understand what he's talking about. He is talking about going into Bucharest, then he says "жители встретили нас на городской площади с пушечную пальбою, от чего пострадало много окошек: но те, на которых поставлена была в стаканах вода, остались невредимы. А почему я это узнал? А вот почему. Пришедши на отведенную мне квартиру, я увидел на окошке стоящую низенькую клеточку, на клеточке была большого размера хрустальная бутылка с прозрачной водой, в ней плавали золотые рыбки, и между ними сидела на примосточке канарейка. Канарейка в воде! - это мне удивило, но, осмотрев, увидел, что в бутылке дно широко и вдавлено глубоко в середину, так что канарейка свободна могла влетать туда и сидеть. После сего сознался сам себе, что я очень недогадлив.
    The inhabitatnts met us in the town square with cannon-fire, from which many windows were shattetered: but those, that had glasses of water on them, remained unharmed. But how did I figure this out? Here's how. Coming to my appointed apartment, I saw on the windowsill a low "kletochka", on which there was a large cyrstal bottle with clear water, where goldfish swam, and between them on a little bridge sat a canary. A canary in the water! This amazed me, but looking close, I saw that in the bottle the bottom was wide and it pinched off deeply in the middle, so that the canary could freely fly there and sit. After this, I admitted to myself I wasn't very perceptive.
    Клеточка = little cage [клетка]
    это меняудивило

    Afterwards, he goes into the apartment and there is a lady there. He asks her "почему у них целы стекла после канонады, и она мне объяснила, что это от воды. А также объяснила и про канарейку: до чего я был несообразителен! " I don't understand how this explains anything.
    I also don't understand what the water in bottles has to do with cannon-fire. Usually people are supposed to stick paper strips on the windows to protect them from sound waves like in WW2. But may be there are some physical laws (window glasses vibrate less and don't crak from sound waves?), experts in physics please explain!


    The bottom of the "bottle" (I think it was rather a huge vessel) was arched and there was space inside enough for a canary to fly from cage into this glass vault. If you look from the side there is an impression that the canary sits inside the bottle.

    2. Inhabitants shoot at them with cannons, breaking a lot of windows(accidentally)
    They didn't shoot at Russians with cannons, they were happily welcoming them with cannon-fires (after all Russians liberated many local nations from wicked Osman turks).

  9. #9
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    Propp, прошлой ночью я прочитал Гранатовый Браслет, мне очень-очень понравился! Какая трагедия, но какая красота! Ведь как Аносов сказал: Любовь должна быть трагедией.
    Но к сожалению, я не думаю что большинство американцев бы понимало. Они бы назвал Желткова "сталкер, маниак", они не понимают его любовь! Я читал другую поэму Куприна, и еще раз видел эту тему: Свадьба, но нет никакой любви, и красивая молодая девушка унижает, и муж виноват.

    Что ты советуешь мне теперь читать? Я хочу читать еще рассказы классиков.

    Я сейчас стараюсь переводить этот рассказ, поэтому если не трудно, может быть ты можешь мне помогать здесь:
    Сколько раз я в жизни наблюдал:
    как только стукнет даме под пятьдесят, а в особенности если она вдова или старая девка, то так и тянет ее около чужой любви покрутиться. Либо шпионит, злорадствует и сплетничает, либо лезет устраивать чужое счастье, либо разводит словесный гуммиарабик насчет возвышенной любви.

    Почему Желтков иногда подписывает "Г.С.Ж." или иногда "П.П.Ж."?

    Николай Николаевич всегда себя зовёт "товарищ прокурора", как будто это настоящая работа, быть другом прокурора. И один раз, заметь, что Куприн его звал "Прокурор" а не "Товарищ прокурора":
    - Нет, виноват, теперь уж я вас перебью... - почти закричал прокурор.

    Однажды он обмолвился, что служит в каком-то казенном учреждении маленьким чиновником, - о телеграфе он не упоминал ни слова.
    Ну как они узнали, что он телеграфист? Говорит в первом письме:
    По роду оружия я бедный телеграфист, но чувства мои
    достойны милорда Георга.
    (Кстати, кто "Милорд Георг"?)

    А я должен сказать, что последние главы были мне очень-очень ясно, я почти бежал сквозь их, в сравнению, мне всегда надо было смотреть в словаре в первых главах.

  10. #10
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    Можешь Чехова почитать. Он более известный классик, чем Куприн.
    Или уж сразу Пушкина. Пушкин, мне кажется, пишет довольно понятно и на очень хорошем русском языке ( )
    А ещё лучше почитать "Двенадцать стульев" Ильфа и Петрова. Эта книга более современная (дело происходит в конце 1920-х годов) и очень популярная до сих пор.

    Почему Желтков иногда подписывает "Г.С.Ж." или иногда "П.П.Ж."?
    П.П.Ж. его называл Василий Львович в своём вымышленном рассказе. Наверное, для него так было забавнее.

    Ну как они узнали, что он телеграфист? Говорит в первом письме:
    Это опять же Василий Львович выдумал. "Телеграфист" как образное название любого мелкого чиновника.


    Сколько раз я в жизни наблюдал:
    как только стукнет даме под пятьдесят, а в особенности если она вдова или старая девка, то так и тянет ее около чужой любви покрутиться. Либо шпионит, злорадствует и сплетничает, либо лезет устраивать чужое счастье, либо разводит словесный гуммиарабик насчет возвышенной любви
    ~~
    So many times in my life I observed:
    As soon a lady is fifty, especially if she is a widow or an old maid, she is soon getting attracted to another people's love. Either she spying, gloating and gossiping, or meddles in another's affairs to establish their happiness, or chattering endlessly (making verbal "gum-arabic") about high love.

    Николай Николаевич всегда себя зовёт "товарищ прокурора", как будто это настоящая работа, быть другом прокурора.
    Не знаю, наверное он был помощником прокурора.



    Мне не совсем кажется, что любовь должна быть трагедией и заканчиваться самоубийством одного из любящих. Рассказ довольно хороший но в конце, по моему мнению, он немного скатывается до уровня банальной романтической мелодрамы. "Ах любовь-морковь!!"

  11. #11
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    Можно почитать Хармса. Особенно его простенькие короткие рассказы. Они забавные, только очень абсурдные. Это такая литература абсурда (опять же 1920-1930 гг.). Они так же популярны до сих пор.

    ЧТО ТЕПЕРЬ ПРОДАЮТ
    В МАГАЗИНАХ
    Коратыгин пришел к Тикакееву и не застал
    его дома.
    А Тикакеев в это время был в магазине и
    покупал там сахар, мясо и огурцы.
    Коратыгин потолкался возле дверей Тика-
    кеева и собрался уже писать записку, вдруг
    смотрит, идет сам Тикакеев и несет в руках
    клеенчатую кошелку.
    Коратыгин увидел Тикакеева и кричит ему:
    - А я вас уже целый час жду!
    - Неправда, - говорит Тикакеев, - я все-
    го двадцать пять минут, как из дома.
    - Ну, уж этого я не знаю, - сказал Кора-
    тыгин, - а только я тут уже целый час.
    - Не врите! - сказал Тикакеев. - Стыдно
    врать.
    - Милостивейший государь! - сказал Кора-
    тыгин. - Потрудитесь выбирать выражения.
    - Я считаю... - начал было Тикакеев, но
    его перебил Коратыгин.
    - Если вы считаете.. - сказал он, но тут
    Коратыгина перебил Тикакеев и сказал:
    - Сам-то ты хорош!
    Эти слова так взбесили Коратыгина, что
    он зажал пальцем одну ноздрю, а другой смор-
    кнулся в Тикакеева.
    Тогда Тикакеев выхватил из кошелки самый
    большой огурец и ударил им Коратыгина по го-
    лове.
    Коратыгин схватился руками за голову,
    упал и умер.
    Вот какие большие огурцы продаются те-
    перь в магазинах!


    ЧЕТЫРЕ ИЛЛЮСТРАЦИИ ТОГО, КАК
    НОВАЯ ИДЕЯ ОГОРАШИВАЕТ ЧЕЛОВЕКА,
    К НЕЙ НЕ ПОДГОТОВЛЕННОГО
    I
    ПИСАТЕЛЬ: Я писатель!
    ЧИТАТЕЛЬ: А по-моему, ты говно!
    (Писатель стоит несколько минут, потря-
    сенный этой новой идеей и падает замерт-
    во. Его выносят.)
    II

    ХУДОЖНИК: Я художник!
    РАБОЧИЙ: А по-моему,ты говно!
    (Художник тут же побледнел, как полотно,
    И как тростиночка закачался
    И неожиданно скончался.
    Его выносят.)

    III
    КОМПОЗИТОР: Я композитор!
    ВАНЯ РУБЛЕВ: А по-моему, ты говно!
    (Композитор, тяжело дыша, так и осел.
    Его неожиданно выносят.)
    IV_
    ХИМИК: Я химик!
    ФИЗИК: А по-моему, ты говно!
    (Химик не сказал больше ни слова и тяже-
    ло рухнул на пол.)


    http://www.lib.ru/HARMS/harms.txt

  12. #12
    Завсегдатай Scorpio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Posts
    1,505
    Rep Power
    13
    Если вернуться к Куприну, то одна из его лучших вещей, по моему скромному мнению - это "Звезда Соломона". Предупреждаю - это целая повесть, и довольно длинная! Но все равно советую попробовать ее почитать...
    Кр. -- сестр. тал.

  13. #13
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Volgograd
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    11

    Перед рождением нового месяца

    перед рождением нового месяца(по-русски так не говорят) = в новолуние или (что более подходить = в начале месяца = в первых числах месяца
    Измотав проивника беспорядочным бегством, окончательно деморализуем его безоговорочной капитуляцией.

  14. #14
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    гммм...но говорит "В середине августа, перед рождением нового месяца"...

  15. #15
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    Наверное, это образное авторское описание.

  16. #16
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    А по-моему, ты говно!

    Damn, it didn't work.

    i'm so bored..i will write a poem about Propp...its really bad though

    Герой знаменитый
    В русском форуме славится
    Как филолог очень хитрый
    Своя слава оставится

    Спасал он в комьпютере
    Беспомощный глупый новичок
    Как Чапаев придет на лошади
    Он носит с собой подарок

    Этот подарок, друзья,специальный
    Так как в руках не держаешь
    Этот подарок - почти волшебный
    Подарок - знание, ты знаешь!

    Так если тебе нужно учитель
    Ты понимать русский не мог
    Да здравствует твой спаситель
    Пропп, герой-филолог!

  17. #17
    Старший оракул
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Гражданин мира
    Posts
    914
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Pravit
    Как Чапаев придет на лошади


    А по-моему, ты говно!

    Quite a useful phrase, do you think so?

    i'm so bored..
    Ничего, для общего развития пригодится.
    (for common intellectual development)

  18. #18
    Подающий надежды оратор
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rostov-on-Don
    Posts
    30
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Pravit
    Что ты советуешь мне теперь читать?
    Вы можете попробовать почитать Шаламова. Думаю, узнаете много нового о России.

    тут можно почитать о авторе на английском
    http://s98.middlebury.edu/RU152A/STUDEN ... /main.html

    тут собственно сами рассказы на русском
    http://www.lib.ru/PROZA/SHALAMOW/kolym.txt

  19. #19
    Завсегдатай
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    с. Хреновое Воронежской обл.
    Posts
    2,481
    Rep Power
    14
    Спасибо большое Устас. А я думал, что "Куприн, я еще не умер" уже давно умер

Similar Threads

  1. Умер Вячеслав Невинный
    By Lampada in forum Culture and History
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 2nd, 2009, 05:08 PM
  2. Replies: 17
    Last Post: December 24th, 2008, 01:23 PM
  3. Умер Мстислав Ростропович
    By Leof in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: April 28th, 2007, 05:24 PM
  4. умер
    By Johnroman in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 7th, 2005, 03:47 AM
  5. умер?
    By labridge31 in forum Говорим по-русски
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: June 27th, 2003, 04:10 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary