Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By alexsms

Thread: Русские фамилии (имени) евреев

  1. #1
    Завсегдатай Antonio1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Пафос - Кипр
    Posts
    1,719
    Rep Power
    9

    Русские фамилии (имени) евреев

    Много евреев живут в Россий. Может быть самый популярный Ходорковский!
    Есть способ сделать вывод из фамилии, еврей ли один россиянин.

    If you didnt' understand the question with my awful russian:
    Is there a way to conclude whether a Russian has Jews ancestors just from his surname?
    Чем больше слов, тем меньше они стоят.

  2. #2
    Почтенный гражданин diogen_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    488
    Rep Power
    9
    Is there a way to conclude whether a Russian has Jews ancestors just from his surname?
    Perhaps, first and foremost such surnames should not have Russian (Ukrainian, Belorussian, Tatar, etc) known roots. For example, Путин is derived from путь (the way).On the other hand, Фельдман sounds pretty Jewish to me. But you can easily confuse some Jewish surnames with Polish or German ones, if you are not an expert.

  3. #3
    Завсегдатай maxmixiv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Omsk, Russia
    Posts
    1,543
    Rep Power
    25
    Many Jews bear surnames Ivanov, Petrov, Sidorov these days. So no, it's impossible.
    "Невозможно передать смысл иностранной фразы, не разрушив при этом её первоначальную структуру."

  4. #4
    Moderator Lampada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    СССР -> США
    Posts
    17,633
    Rep Power
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by maxmixiv View Post
    Many Jews bear surnames Ivanov, Petrov, Sidorov these days. ...
    Really? Many? This is kind of creepy and... sad.

  5. #5
    Завсегдатай maxmixiv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Omsk, Russia
    Posts
    1,543
    Rep Power
    25
    These days... they last for centuries already. It confused me already in 1970s, in kindergarten.
    Anecdote, as usually, demonstrates better:
    После Октябрьской революции обеспокоенный бог послал в Россию
    трёх наблюдателей: Луку, Илью и Моисея. От них поступают
    телеграммы:
    "Попал в ЧК. Святой Лука."
    "Попал и я. Пророк Илья."
    "Жив-здоров. Нарком Петров."
    "Невозможно передать смысл иностранной фразы, не разрушив при этом её первоначальную структуру."

  6. #6
    Завсегдатай Throbert McGee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fairfax, VA (Фэйрфэкс, ш. Виргиния, США)
    Posts
    1,591
    Rep Power
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by Lampada View Post
    Really? Many? This is kind of creepy and... sad.
    I had to stop and think for a moment about Lampada's remark, because here in the US, I've certainly met some Jews who had "very non-Jewish" surnames. Often, they were the children (or grandchildren) of a Jewish woman whose non-Jewish husband was agnostic or atheist and didn't object to the children being raised in the Jewish faith. So, the kids inherited their mother's Jewish religion and cultural identity, but inherited their father's non-Jewish surname.

    But perhaps this scenario is much rarer in Russia -- and Jews there who are named "Ivanov" may have changed their surnames out of shame or fear of antisemitism, and not because their fathers happened to be non-Jews named "Ivanov." (Historically, this happened in America too, but not so much anymore.)
    Говорит Бегемот: "Dear citizens of MR -- please correct my Russian mistakes!"

  7. #7
    Властелин
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Russia
    Posts
    1,038
    Rep Power
    21
    To Antonio, it is possible. The names of some of the so called 'oligarchs' (this word should always be in quotes, you know, given the original Greek meaning of the roots) end with -ий (Ходороковский, Березовский, well the latter is no longer a factor), -ич (Абрамович). These people are Jewish and it's possible to guess it from their names, and well - the way they look))) Another identifier would be name with a double German root (like Einstein, or similar) as there are Jews who took German names while residing in Germany and Eastern Europe. I am not sure about Polish names, but some Russian Jews may have Polish names too (not very often though). And there are also names that don't look Russian at all, and it's easy to guess that such names are Jewish. The reason I have seen so many Jewish names here in Russia is that I work in power system engineering, and this has always been one of the traditional fields where 'Jewish technical intelligentsia' applies their knowledge.

    To Throbert, Jews were changing names in USSR due to political situation. An example, just off the top of my head, which I remember is Яков Казаков (one of the first Jews in USSR who managed to fight the system and emigrate to Israel in the 70s when it was almost impossible to do it at that time). Their family name was Казаков, a common Russian name, i don't remember why particularly this name now, but it was due to the political situation. In Israel he became an army officer with combat experience, intelligence officer and close to prime ministers and he took a Jewish name (Яков Кедми).
    Antonio1986 likes this.

  8. #8
    Завсегдатай Antonio1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Пафос - Кипр
    Posts
    1,719
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by alexsms View Post
    To Antonio, it is possible. The names of some of the so called 'oligarchs' (this word should always be in quotes, you know, given the original Greek meaning of the roots) end with -ий (Ходороковский, Березовский, well the latter is no longer a factor), -ич (Абрамович). These people are Jewish and it's possible to guess it from their names, and well - the way they look))) Another identifier would be name with a double German root (like Einstein, or similar) as there are Jews who took German names while residing in Germany and Eastern Europe. I am not sure about Polish names, but some Russian Jews may have Polish names too (not very often though). And there are also names that don't look Russian at all, and it's easy to guess that such names are Jewish. The reason I have seen so many Jewish names here in Russia is that I work in power system engineering, and this has always been one of the traditional fields where 'Jewish technical intelligentsia' applies their knowledge.

    To Throbert, Jews were changing names in USSR due to political situation. An example, just off the top of my head, which I remember is Яков Казаков (one of the first Jews in USSR who managed to fight the system and emigrate to Israel in the 70s when it was almost impossible to do it at that time). Their family name was Казаков, a common Russian name, i don't remember why particularly this name now, but it was due to the political situation. In Israel he became an army officer with combat experience, intelligence officer and close to prime ministers and he took a Jewish name (Яков Кедми).
    Excellent information alexsms and extremely helpful.
    Чем больше слов, тем меньше они стоят.

  9. #9
    Почтенный гражданин
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    423
    Rep Power
    5
    It's kinda creepy that people want to find out how to distinguish between Jewish people and other ethnic groups living in Russia, especially based on last names.
    Maybe it's just me.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 5th, 2012, 05:30 PM
  2. Что смешного в этой фамилии?
    By sperk in forum Russian Names
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: November 18th, 2009, 11:04 AM
  3. мать по имени и отчеству
    By sperk in forum Russian Names
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: April 22nd, 2009, 12:26 PM
  4. ''что в имени тебе моем''
    By Орчун in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: May 27th, 2007, 10:24 PM
  5. просто по имени...
    By sperk in forum Grammar and Vocabulary
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 16th, 2007, 08:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Russian Lessons                           

Russian Tests and Quizzes            

Russian Vocabulary