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Thread: What do `go into`, `bit of a daze` and 'put through the ringer' mean?

  1. #1
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    What do `go into`, `bit of a daze` and 'put through the ringer' mean?

    Girl (warrant officer) says: "Hey, sorry about before. I went into a bit of a daze putting those two idiots through the rigner."

    Prehistory: two soldiers started a fight in certain place, so the Girl went there to stop them.

    I can't understand next parts (green is answered):
    1. `go into` - what does it mean in this context?
    2. `bit of a daze` ???
    3. `putting through the ringer` - what is `the ringer` and how it is related to `put through`?


    screenshot.1435082453.jpg

  2. #2
    Почётный участник vikk's Avatar
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    I am also interested to know about it
    nexen likes this.

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    3 - wringer
    nexen likes this.
    Налево пойдёшь - коня потеряешь, направо пойдёшь - сам голову сложишь.
    Прямой путь не предлагать!

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    Are you certain about that? I added screenshot with that text. Do you think it's a typo?

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    Почтенный гражданин xXHoax's Avatar
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    Sorry, no context for the quote(need a lot since it's so strange). My assumption is that it's a foreign game translated into British(maybe) English. If you've ever watched Monty Python skits, youll know that british english CAN be completely different than American. Not always. In the case of Monty Python, I can hardly understand what they're saying. Anyway, it seems like british english since "going into a daze" definitely isnt something an American would say. It means he/she: zoned out, went into a trance, daydreamed. Just generally lost focus. "went into" is used just as weird english crap, to turn the concept of "daze" into more of a verb. To be dazed is sort of another way to say it. Google just the word daze and google will give you a better explanation of the word itself. As for "putting someone through the ringer", that is some absurd, british, cop, slang. I legitimately don't know what that means. If it's not british, then the writers are just saying things weirdly for interest's sake. With context, is there anything that beeps or rings in the scenario? Like a metal detector or something? Thats all I could think "ringer" means.

    Very small chance that it's a boxing reference... There's a bell that rings at the end of a boxing match... I dont know, maybe..
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    Quote Originally Posted by xXHoax View Post
    As for "putting someone through the ringer", that is some absurd, british, cop, slang. I legitimately don't know what that means.
    Cambridge dictionaries :

    put sb through the wringer
    informal
    › to ask someone difficult or unpleasant questions, often to find out if they are doing their job in a satisfactory way:
    Outside investigators will put the company's accounting practices through the wringer.
    nexen likes this.
    Налево пойдёшь - коня потеряешь, направо пойдёшь - сам голову сложишь.
    Прямой путь не предлагать!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by xXHoax View Post
    My assumption is that it's a foreign game translated into British(maybe) English.
    Yes, it's japanese game which was translated on english.

    Quote Originally Posted by xXHoax View Post
    Anyway, it seems like british english since "going into a daze" definitely isnt something an American would say. It means he/she: zoned out, went into a trance, daydreamed.
    I think, it can be true considering her personality as playful girl which seems to be on ease about all time but she is the serious one then it comes to danger

    Quote Originally Posted by xXHoax View Post
    If it's not british, then the writers are just saying things weirdly for interest's sake.
    Said about it above.

    Quote Originally Posted by xXHoax View Post
    With context, is there anything that beeps or rings in the scenario? Like a metal detector or something? Thats all I could think "ringer" means.
    Very small chance that it's a boxing reference... There's a bell that rings at the end of a boxing match... I dont know, maybe..
    No, there were no rings or something at all.
    If it is `boxing match` than how can it be translated?
    I guess, it can be one. Not official, but... oh.. when two mans are starting fighting, crowd appears around of them shouting something like `kill him` or other. It is usually shown for prisoners, but I thinks something like this can be the case for soldiers too.

    Also, what do you think about type as Полуношник said that `ringer` is `wringer` actually?

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    Почтенный гражданин xXHoax's Avatar
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    I don't think I've ever heard the word wringer. The chances that that (<-- wow english) was both what they meant, and that there was a typo like that, are very very small. As unlikely as that is, no other answer is any more likely, so ....
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